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Full text of "University of New Haven Graduate School Bulletin, 1981-82"

AC 30 

1981/82 

Grad 



L E T I N OF THE 

RSITY OF NEW HNEN 

Graduate School 




8 1 



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University 
of New Haven 

Graduate School 
1981 -82 Bulletin 



University of New Haven 
300 Orange Avenue 
West Haven, Conn. 06516 
(203) 934-6321 



This bulletin supersedes all previous bulletins, catalogs and 
brochures published by the Graduate School and describes 
academic programs to be offered during 1981-1982. Graduate 
students admitted to the university in the fall of 1981 and 
thereafter are bound by the regulations published in this bulletin. 

The University of New Haven is committed to affirmative 
action and to a policy which provides for equal opportunity in 
employment, advancement, admission, educational opportunity 
and administration of financial aid to all persons on the basis of 
individual merit. This policy is administered without regard to 
race, color, national origin, age, sex, religion or disabilities not 
related to performance. It is the policy of the University of New 
Haven not to discriminate on the basis of sex in its admission, 
educational programs, activities or employment policies as 
required by Title IX of the 1972 Education Amendments. 

Inquiries regarding affirmative action, equal opportunity 
and Title IX may be directed to the director of equal oppor- 
tunity. 

The male generic terms appearing throughout this book refer 
to both males and females and are used for grammatical simplic- 
ity and semantic convenience. 

The university reserves the right, at any time, to make 
whatever changes may be deemed necessary in admission 
requirements, fees, charges, tuition, regulations and academic 
programs prior to the start of any class, term, semester, trimester 
or session. 



The Bulletin of the University of New Haven is published eight times per 
year in February, April, May (2), July (2) and November (2) by the University of 
New Haven, 300 Orange Avenue, West Haven, Connecticut 06516. Second class 
postage paid at New Haven, Connecticut, publication number USPS 423-410. 
Postmaster: please send form 3579 to Office of Public Relations, University of 
New Haven, P.O. Box 1306, New Haven, CT 06505. 



Academic Programs 



Accounting 


25 


Business Administration 


27 


Hospitality Administration 


34 


Business Administration/ Industrial 


36 


Engineering dual degree 




Community Psychology 


38 


Computer and Information Science 


41 


Criminal Justice 


43 


Electrical Engineering 


47 


Environmental Engineering 


49 


Environmental Sciences 


51 


Executive M.B.A. 


52 


Forensic Science 


54 


Gerontology 


51 


Humanities 


59 


Industrial Engineering 


60 


Industrial Relations 


62 


Legal Studies 


64 


Logistics 


65 


Mechanical Engineering 


67 


Occupational Safety and 


69 


Health Management 




Operations Research 


71 


Organizational/ Industrial Psychology 


73 


Public Administration 


77 


Senior Professional Certificates 


79 


Taxation 


86 



See inside back cover for application form. 



Contents 




Calendar 


V 


General Information 


1 


Admission 


2 


Academic Policies 


6 


Tuition and Fees 


12 


Financial Support 


15 


Student Services 


19 


Academic Programs 


25 


Course Descriptions 


91 


Board, Administration and Faculty 


151 


Index 


169 


Campus Map 


174 


Transcript Request Form 


back cover 


Application 


back cover 



Calendar 
1981-1982 

Graduate School 

1981-1982 

Summer Term: Monday, July 13-Thursday, August 27 

Fall term deadline for receipt of completed 

applications for admission and all supporting materials * August 1 

Fall Term: Wednesday, September 9-Thursday, December 17 

Last day to register Friday, August 28 

Last day to add a class Friday, September 18 

Fall holiday Monday-Tuesday, September 28-29 

Wednesday-Thursday, October 7-8 
Last day to file petition for 

January graduation Thursday, October 15 

Holiday (Thanksgiving) Wednesday-Saturday, November 25-28 

Commencement Sunday, January 17 

Winter Term: Saturday, January 2-Thursday, April 1 

Last day to register Friday, December 18 

Last day to add a class Thursday, January 14 

Holiday (President's Day) Monday, February 15 

(Monday classes will meet Friday, February 19) 
Last day to file petition for 

June graduation Monday, March 1 
Spring term deadline for receipt of completed applications 

for admission and all supporting materials * Monday, March 1 

Commencement Sunday, June 6 

Spring Term: Monday, April 5-Saturday, July 3 

Last day to register Friday, March 26 

Last day to add a class Thursday, April 15 

Holiday (Memorial Day) Monday, May 31 

(Monday classes will meet Friday, June 4, 
usual time) 

* Prospective students completing their applications after this date may register for one term as nonmatriculated 
students. This registration of those whose applications are in process does not guarantee acceptance. 
International students are not eligible for in process registration because of immigration requirements and should 
submit completed applications and all supporting materials well in advance of these deadlines. 




Student participation con- 
tributes to the success of any 
graduate course. 



General Information 



The Graduate School of the University of New Haven offers 
master's degrees in 23 program areas at seven locations 
throughout Connecticut. 

The main campus in West Haven offers all academic pro- 
grams, and off-campus centers at Waterbury, Danbury, Trum- 
bull, Middletown, Madison and Groton-New London offer 
courses leading to master's degrees in business administration, 
computer and information science and other programs. 

The enrollment and programming needs of off-campus 
students at the Groton-New London center are coordinated by 
Dr. Robert DeMichiell, director for UNH in southeastern Con- 
necticut (449-8518). Elaine Lewis is administrative coordinator 
for other off -campus centers (743-7883). 

Most Graduate School courses are scheduled during the late 
afternoon, early evenings and on Saturdays to meet the needs of 
part-time, employed students. 

Full-time enrollment also is possible in the following pro- 
grams: business administration, public administration, account- 
ing, taxation, criminal justice, environmental science, industrial 
engineering, industrial relations, computer and information 
science, forensic science, operations research, community 
psychology, organizational/industrial psychology, mechanical 
engineering and the dual M.B. A. /industrial engineering degree. 

The University of New Haven is fully accredited by the New 
England Association of Schools and Colleges. It is also a member 
of the Council of Graduate Schools, the Northeastern Associa- 
tion of Graduate School, the Academy of Criminal Justice 
Sciences, and the National Association of Schools of Public 
Affairs and Administration. 



Admission 

Director: John O'Brien, M.B.A., University of New Haven. 

General requirements 

Applicants to the University of New Haven Graduate School 
are required to have an undergraduate degree from an accredited 
institution. Certain programs have additional requirements for 
admission to specific curricula, details of which are included in 
the program listings later in the bulletin. 

Admission decisions are based primarily on an applicant's 
undergraduate record. Prospective students who are currently 
completing their undergraduate study should submit an official 
transcript complete to the date of application. In most cases, an 
admission decision will be made on the basis of the partial 
transcript, contingent upon completion of the baccalaureate 
degree. Registration will not be permitted until a final, official 
transcript is submitted to the Graduate School admissions office. 

In support of an application, students may submit their 
scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), both the 
Aptitude Test and the Advanced Test, the Graduate Management 
Admission Test (GMAT) or the Miller Analogies Test. Students 
may be required to take one or more of these tests. 

Procedure 

An applicant for admission to the Graduate School must 
submit a formal application, two letters of recommendation, 
complete official transcripts of all previous college work and the 
nonrefundable application fee. 

Students may be admitted for any term. Should a student be 
unable to enter the Graduate School during the term for which 
admission is granted, the acceptance will remain open for one 
calendar year. After one year, a new application for admission 
will be required. 



Admission categories 

Applicants and students in the Graduate School are assigned 
to one of three categories: fully matriculated, provisional or 
special. 



Fully matriculated 

Students accepted for entrance into a regular degree pro- 
gram are fully matriculated students. 

Provisional 

Applicants whose undergraduate average falls below the 
standard set for full matriculation may be accepted provision- 
ally. Students accepted provisionally should seek out the advice 
of their coordinator or adviser so that their graduate work can 
be closely supervised. 

Students must complete the work stipulated in their provi- 
sional acceptance before they will be evaluated for admission as 
fully matriculated graduate students. 

Special 

Special student status is reserved for students who do not 
wish to matriculate in a program. Registration is limited to 12 
credit hours of graduate work. Should the student desire to con- 
tinue graduate work, he or she must be accepted into a specific 
graduate program. Special students are responsible for seeing to 
it that prerequisite requirements for the courses they wish to take 
are met. 

Students who wish to matriculate in a degree program, but 
complete their applications after the stated deadline, should 
register as in process students to take advantage of advisement in 
their fields of study. These students should not apply for special 
student status. 

Auditors 

An auditor is allowed to attend class and is expected to par- 
ticipate in class discussions and complete the required 
assignments. An auditor receives no grade or credit toward any 
degree. Auditor status does not imply admission to any of the 
graduate degree programs. Both registered students and 
nonstudents are eligible to audit University of New Haven 
Graduate School courses. 



Admission of international students 

Qualified international students are welcome as students in 
the Graduate School of the University of New Haven. 

The major criterion for the admission of international 
students is the same as that used for citizens of the United States: 
Does the undergraduate preparation of the student qualify him 
or her for graduate study in a degree program at the University 
of New Haven? Since institutions and systems of higher educa- 
tion vary from country to country, the international applicant 
may expect that he or she will be asked to provide substantia- 
tion, not only of the courses taken and grades received, but also 
of the academic reputation of the undergraduate school within 
the educational system of the particular country. All transcripts 
must be provided in English. 

In addition, the Graduate School requires that the applicant 
submit evidence of English proficiency. The Test of English as a 
Foreign Language (TOEFL) examination is recommended, but if 
undergraduate work has been completed in English or if arrange- 
ments for the TOEFL are difficult, the GRE or GMAT exam- 
inations may be substituted for the TOEFL. The Graduate School 
may also require that evidence of English proficiency be ascer- 
tained by an overseas interview, any charge for which must be 
borne by the prospective student. 

Every international applicant will be evaluated carefully 
regarding undergraduate subject matter mastery and English pro- 
ficiency. A student whose examination score falls below accept- 
able standards for English proficiency (which in the case of the 
TOEFL examination is 500-550) or whose undergraduate work 
does not provide necessary preparation for the particular pro- 
gram of study chosen in the Graduate School, may be admitted 
subject to the requirement that the course of study at the Univer- 
sity of New Haven include intensive work in English and 
undergraduate courses, for which no graduate credit will be 
given. 

International applicants for degree programs which require a 
thesis will be evaluated for English language writing skills. Fur- 
ther courses in writing skill development may be required. 

International students will need to provide a signed financial 
resource statement prior to the issuance of an 1-20, since the 
university must certify that it has checked the international stu- 
dent's finances. The University of New Haven does not offer 
financial assistance to international students. 

One year's tuition, meaning the tuition for three, three- 
credit courses for each of three terms, is required in advance 
before a form 1-20 will be issued. This tuition will be refunded 
according to usual refund policies if the 1-20 is returned to the 
Graduate School Admission Office. 



International students are required to have medical insur- 
ance, and may elect to purchase the university's student policy if 
they wish. 

Since the review of applications from international students 
takes much longer than those from citizens of the United States, 
it is important that applications and all supporting materials be 
received by the Graduate School well before the stated deadline 
in the academic calendar. 

U.S. immigration regulations require that students holding a 
student visa maintain adequate progress. Adequate progress 
means full-time study, which is generally interpreted to mean 
taking at least three courses each term. Prospective international 
students should, therefore, note that not all graduate programs 
are designed to permit full-time study. A complete listing of such 
programs is provided elsewhere in this bulletin. 

Upon acceptance students are invited to contact the director 
of housing for assistance in locating living accommodations. 

Graduate students studying under an F-1 visa are allowed 24 
months to complete a degree program. All F-1 visa students must 
register for a minimum of 9 credit hours per term. Once visa 
students have completed their degree program the International 
Student Office will not issue an 1-538 for extension of temporary 
stay, except for periods of practical training approved by the 
Graduate School and the U.S. Office of Immigration. 



Registration 

Registration deadlines are listed in the graduate calendar and 
in the class schedules that are published each term. Returning 
students and new students who have been admitted to programs 
will receive registration materials and can register by mail. Some 
departments have other procedures and will notify the students 
involved directly. 

Prospective students who complete their applications after 
the stated deadline may register as in-process students. They will 
not receive registration materials in the mail but may register in 
person at the main campus or at an off-campus center. Proof 
that the in-process student has an undergraduate degree will be 
required at the time of registration, and, whenever possible, 
unofficial transcripts of previous course work should be provided 
to facilitate advisement. In-process status remains in effect for a 
maximum of one term, and in-process students may register for 
no more than six credits' work without the approval of the coor- 
dinator of the program for which they are applying. 



It is the responsibility of in-process students to see to it that 
all materials in support of their application are received by the 
university in time for a matriculation decision before the next 
term. In-process students will not be permitted to register a sec- 
ond time until a matriculation decision has been made. Accept- 
ance as an in-process student does not guarantee admission to 
the Graduate School. 

Any student who fails to register for two consecutive terms 
will no longer receive registration materials. It will be the 
responsibility of the student to notify Graduate Records of the 
desire to continue graduate study. 

No add slips will be accepted after the first week of class. A 
student may withdraw from a course any time prior to the last 
scheduled class meeting. Course additions or withdrawals may 
be handled in person or by mail. 

The university reserves the right to change class schedules or 
instructors at any time. It further reserves the right to cancel any 
course, and, in such cases, will refund full tuition to the 
students. 

Students with an outstanding balance will not be permitted 
to register. Current students who register after the registration 
deadline will be assessed a late registration fee. 



Academic Policies 



Academic counseling 

Students may request academic counseling at any time. 
Appointments should be scheduled through department chairmen 
or program coordinators. Off-campus advisement evenings are 
held periodically. 

It is the student's responsibility to select courses in accord- 
ance with prerequisites, the adviser's recommendations, the 
departmental plan of study (if required) and the requirements for 
the degree. 

A student is not required to file a formal plan of study with 
the Graduate School. It is the student's responsibility to meet the 
stated requirements for the degree. 



Awarding of degrees 

The University of New Haven awards degrees twice a year, 
at commencements in January and in June. 

A quality point ratio of 3.0 is required for graduation. 
Students completing the requirements for a degree at the end of 
the fall term will receive the degree in January. Students com- 
pleting the requirements for a degree at the end of the winter 
term will receive the degree at the June commencement. Students 
completing the requirements for a degree at the end of the spring 
term will receive the degree the following January. Students com- 
pleting the requirements for a degree in July will receive a formal 
statement that they have completed all requirements for the 
degree and will formally be awarded their diploma in January. 

Candidates for January Commencement must file a petition 
with Graduate Records no later than October 14, and for June 
Commencement no later than March 1. Forms for this purpose 
are available in the Graduate School Office and in the Office of 
the Registrar. Payment of the graduation fee must accompany 
the petition. 

Should a candidate not fulfill all the requirements for 
graduation before the deadline after having filed the petition to 
graduate and paid the fee, the student will have to petition again 
at a later date. At that time, only the refiling fee will be charged. 

All financial obligations to the university must be met prior 
to graduation. 



Grading system 

The Graduate School uses the following grading system: 
A — Superior performance 
B — Good performance 
C — Passing performance 
F — Failure 

P — Pass -carries credit hours toward the degree 
S — Satisfactory performance in a noncredit course 
W — Withdrawal from a course 
I — Incomplete-given on rare occasions. A grade of I that is 

not changed within one calendar year automatically reverts 

to a W. 
T — Used for thesis /seminar project students who have not 

completed work during the term in which they originally 

registered for the course. Students must complete their 

work within the maximum allowable time for graduate 

work. 



Grade reports 



Reports of the final grade in each subject will be mailed to 
the student soon after the close of each term. 



Academic standards 

The academic standing of each student is determined on the 
basis of the quality point ratio earned each term. 

To determine a quality point, each letter grade earned dur- 
ing a term is assigned a quality point value: 

A — Four quality points 
B — Three quality points 
C — Two quality points 
F — Zero quality points 
P — Zero quality points 
S — Zero quality points 
U — Zero quality points 
W — Zero quality points 
I — Zero quality points 
T — Zero quality points 

The quality point ratio is obtained by multiplying the qual- 
ity point value of each grade by the number of semester hours 
assigned to each course in the bulletin, then dividing the total 
quality points carried by the total semester hours attempted. 

A cumulative quality point ratio is obtained by calculating 
the quality point ratio for all courses attempted at the University 
of New Haven. 



Repetition of woric 

A student may repeat a course, with the new grade 
superseding the old grade in the computation of the quality point 
ratio. The original grade remains on the transcript. 



Probation and appeals 

Any graduate student whose cumulative quality point ratio 
(QPR) is below 3.0, a B average, will be considered to be on 
academic probation, and may be required to obtain permission 
from the program coordinator before registering for additional 



course work. A student whose cumulative QPR is below 2.7 
after completion of 24 credits will be required to withdraw from 
the Graduate School. 

Appeals concerning directed withdrawal from the Graduate 
School under these circumstances should be directed to the dean 
of the Graduate School, who will in turn refer the appeal to the 
department chairman and /or the responsible administrative unit. 



Transfer credit 

Transfer credit may be given for graduate courses taken at 
other accredited institutions subject to the following conditions: 

a. the courses were at the graduate level; 

b. each grade was B or better; and 

c. the courses did not fulfill requirements for any other degree 
already earned by the student. 

Graduate students at the university must secure written 
approval before taking courses at another institution if they plan 
to transfer that credit into their UNH program. Course Coor- 
dination forms are available in the Graduate School office for 
this purpose. 



Waiver of courses 

Some programs permit waivers of core courses on the basis 
of undergraduate courses taken at accredited institutions. 
Waivers of elective courses are not permitted, nor are waivers 
based upon experience. In such cases, substitution of a more 
advanced course may be allowed. 

For a course to be waived, a student must first secure the 
written approval of the department chairman or a faculty mem- 
ber acting for the department chairman in the department in 
which the waiver is requested. Only fully matriculated students 
may seek waivers. 



Tliesis 

A number of preliminary steps are required before registra- 
tion for thesis will be accepted by the graduate registrar. The 
student completes the form. Proposal for Theses, ,in which the 
proposed subject, the methodology and the hypothesis are 
described. The student secures the approval signature of a fac- 
ulty member who will serve as adviser. The student must also 



secure the approval of the proposed thesis and the thesis adviser 
by the program coordinator and the dean of the Graduate 
School. Only after the graduate registrar has received the signed 
proposal form will the student be permitted to register for thesis. 

A thesis will carry no fewer than six academic credits taken 
over no fewer than two academic terms. A preliminary draft 
must be presented to the adviser at least 45 days prior to com- 
mencement. Upon approval by the adviser and program coordi- 
nator, two final, unbound copies are presented to the Graduate 
School at least three weeks before commencement. After the 
dean of the Graduate School approves the thesis, credit is 
awarded and the thesis is deposited in the university library for 
binding and becomes part of the permanent collection. Addi- 
tional copies may be required by the adviser or the program 
coordinator. 

For guidance in the preparation of theses, graduate students 
should consult A Manual for the Preparation of Graduate Theses 
and Technical Projects, copies of which are available in the 
Graduate School Office. Questions not resolved by the instruc- 
tions should be settled in consultation with the adviser and by 
reference to a standard style manual. The Graduate School par- 
ticipates in the University Microfilm Masters Program, and out- 
standing theses will be awarded this recognition upon the recom- 
mendation of the adviser, the program coordinator, or both. 



Research projects, seminar projects, 
and independent study 

Some departments and academic programs require the com- 
pletion of research projects, seminar projects, or independent 
study rather than theses. In these cases, as with a thesis, students 
must have the written approval of their advisers and department 
chairmen prior to enrolling. This is accomplished by completing 
the form. Proposal for Research Projects, Seminar Projects or 
Independent Studies, and securing required approvals. 

Students preparing a research project, seminar project, or 
independent study should follow the guidelines presented in the 
Manual for the Preparation of Graduate Theses and Seminar 
Projects, copies of which are available in the office of the 
Graduate School. 



10 



Time limit for completion 
of degree requirements 

Students must complete all the requirements for their degree 
within five years of the date of their initial matriculation in the 
program. Any extension of the time limit can be granted only by 
the dean of the Graduate School after consultation with the 
appropriate program coordinator. 



Residency requirements 

Degree programs have a 30-graduate-credit residency 
requirement, with the exception of the M.B.A./M.S.I.E. dual 
degree program which has a 60-graduate-credit residency require- 
ment. Credits toward the residency requirements may be earned 
at the main campus or at the off-campus centers. Students taking 
classes off -campus are reminded that the Graduate School 
strongly encourages, and scheduling limitations frequently 
require, that you plan on taking at least three courses at the 
Main Campus. 



Graduate school ethics 

It is Graduate School policy that all students are expected to 
complete all course requirements on their own initiative and 
endeavor, with no collaboration unless specifically authorized by 
an instructor. In addition, material used by students but 
authored by another individual, publisher, company, govern- 
ment or organization shall be identified as such by appropriate 
footnotes or references. Violations of this policy, either in fact or 
in spirit, will normally be handled by the faculty member 
involved though they may be grounds for dismissal from the 
Graduate School. Students wishing to appeal the decision of a 
faculty member should contact the Graduate School office. 

It is the responsibility of the student to meet all classes and 
take all exams on schedule. Faculty have the right to require a 
standard of attendance, even if it conflicts with professional and 
job-related responsibilities of students. Students whose jobs 
require that they be absent from class must realize that it is their 
responsibility to determine whether such absence is permitted by 
the faculty member involved, and to meet their professor's 
requirements for making up missed work, if the professor allows 
missed time to be made up. 



u 



Professors may assess a make-up examination fee when a 
student is permitted to take an end-of-term examination at a time 
other than the scheduled time except for conflicts caused by the 
examination schedule. 

A make-up test fee is assessed when a student is permitted 
to make up an announced test during the term. Both these fees 
are paid at the Business Office. 



Tuition and fees 



The following are the University of New Haven tuition, fees 
and charges which were in effect for the 1980-81 school year. 
The university reserves the right, at any time, to make whatever 
changes may be deemed necessary in admission requirements, 
fees, charges, tuition, regulations and academic programs prior 
to the start of any class, term semester, term or session. 

Tuition* 

Tuition, per credit hour $105 

Executive MBA program 7,500 

Noncredit course fee, per course 198 

Auditor, per course 198 

Nonrefundable Fees 

Application fee $15 

Auditor application fee 15 

Graduate Student Council fee, per term 2 

Graduation fee 35 

Graduation refiling fee 15 

Laboratory fee 28 

Computer use fee 28 

Late payment fee 10 

Late registration fee, current students 15 

Registration fee, per term 5 

Senior professional certificate fee 

(payable upon completion of program) 10 

Transcript fee, first copy free 

Additional copies 2 

Fee for dropping a course 5 

Make-up examination fee 5 

Make-up test fee 3 

*Tuition will be higher for 1981-82. 



12 



Payment 

Tuition for graduate courses is due at registration. However, 
the university permits graduate students to pay tuition on an 
installment basis, paying one half with the registration form and 
the balance before the first day of the term. All students who 
have not completed tuition payments by the first day of the term 
will be assessed the late payment fee. 

Students are responsible for payment of tuition to the uni- 
versity, even though they may be eligible for their employer's 
tuition reimbursement plan. Students are responsible for making 
their own arrangements with their employers for reimbursement. 

The university withholds the giving of grades, the award of 
diplomas, the issuance of transcripts and the granting of honor- 
able dismissal to any student whose account is in arrears. 

The university accepts Master Charge and VISA for pay- 
ment of tuition. 



Withdrawal 

To be eligible for a refund of tuition, students must formally 
notify the registrar of their intention to withdraw by completing 
the university withdrawal form and submitting it to the registrar 
by mail or in person. The date of the postmark on mailed with- 
drawal form, or the date of submission on those brought in 
person, determines the amount of the refund, if any, due the 
student. 



Refunds 

The refund policy for graduate students who withdraw from 
any course or from any program is as follows: 80% refund of 
tuition upon formal withdrawal prior to the second regularly 
scheduled class meeting, 60% refund of tuition upon formal 
withdrawal prior to the third regularly scheduled class meeting, 
40% refund of tuition upon formal withdrawal prior to the 
fourth regularly scheduled class meeting, 20% refund of tuition 
upon formal withdrawal prior to the fifth regularly scheduled 
class meeting. No refund will be made after the fifth regularly 
scheduled class meeting. 



13 



Living costs 

Estimated costs for attending the University of New Haven 
Graduate School for the 1980-81 academic year are as follows: 

Single Student e Credits 9 Credits 12 Credits 

Tuition and Fees $ 637. $ 952. $ 1,267. 

Books and Materials 60. 90. 120. 

Base Living Costs 1,850. 1,850. 1,850. 

Cost Per Trimester 
Cost Per Year (10 months) 

iVIarried — No Children 



$2,547. 


$ 2,892. 


$ 3,237. 


$7,641. 


$ 8,676. 


$ 9,711. 


1 
$ 637. 


$ 952. 


$ 1,267. 


60. 


90. 


120. 


2,548. 


2,548. 


2,548. 



Tuition and Fees 

Books and Materials 

Base Living Costs 

Cost Per Trimester $3,245. $ 3,590. $ 3,935. 

Cost Per Year (10 months) $9,735. $10,770. $11,805. 

Budgets are adjusted for additional family members. 

Additional living costs for summer: 

Single $1,106. 

Married $1,485. 

NOTE: Living costs are based on Estimated BLS Moderate Consumption 
Budget Standards (20-35 age group) adjusted to Fall 1980. 
Source: GAPSFAS News and Notes Vol. II, No. 4, January 1979. 



14 



Financial support for 
graduate study 

Financial support is available to graduate students in the 
form of assistantships, grants-in-aid, loans and work study. 

Assistantships are competitive appointments. The full-time 
graduate assistant works 20 hours per week and receives com- 
pensation and partial tuition support. The part-time graduate 
assistant carries a varying work requirement of between 5 and 10 
hours per week for which the assistant receives compensation, 
but no tuition support. These awards are generally made in the 
spring of the preceding academic year. 

Grant-in-aid awards are based upon financial need and re- 
quire that the Graduate and Professional School Financial Aid 
Service (GAPSFAS) application be received by the financial aid 
office no later than July 1, December 1, and March 1, depending 
upon when the student is beginning graduate study. Applications 
received after these dates can be acted upon only as funds 
permit. 

The state of Connecticut and other states have established 
loan programs offering long-term loans at low interest rates. In 
Connecticut, a full-time graduate student may borrow up to a 
maximum of $5,000 each school year. Repayment starts six 
months after graduation. Federal interest benefits cover the full 
interest while in attendance and during the year following 
graduation. 

Part-time employment is also available to graduate students 
under the college work-study program. The program enables 
students with financial need to work on- or off-campus for a 
maximum of 20 hours a week. 



Application and eligibility 

A GAPSFAS application is required for all forms of support 
based upon need. GAPSFAS applications are available in the 
financial aid office and the Graduate School office. 

GAPSFAS applications are mailed by the student directly to 
GAPSFAS for processing, after which GAPSFAS will forward 
the application to the university. Generally, GAPSFAS requires 
four weeks to process applications before forwarding to the 
school. Since the university must receive the processed applica- 
tion by the deadline date, approximately four weeks before the 
start of the term for which the student is seeking aid, students 
are encouraged to file financial applications early. A list of exact 
university deadlines is available from the financial aid office. 



15 



International students are not eligible for financial assistance 
based upon need, since they must certify availability of sufficient 
funds at time of entry. Students on academic probation are not 
eligible for financial aid. 



Title XX funds 

All graduate students should be aware that they may be able 
to receive a waiver of tuition through Title XX. To receive this 
waiver, students must be full- or part-time paid employees of 
agencies receiving Title XX funding. At least 20% of students' 
professional responsibilities must involve face-to-face contact 
with clients of their agencies. In addition to completing all forms 
normally required for admission, students must complete Title 
XX forms. 

Students who believe they qualify should contact the Title 
XX Office. 



16 



17 




Class breaks are a time to 
share ideas, establish friend- 
ships. 



18 



student Services 



Alumni Association 

Membership in the Alumni Association is acquired imme- 
diately upon graduation. All degree graduates become members 
automatically. 

As a member of the Alumni Association, graduates receive 
an alumni card which enables them to use the library, gym- 
nasium facilities and the services of the Career Development 
Office. In addition, alumni can now audit approved under- 
graduate and graduate courses. Insight, an all-college publica- 
tion, is mailed to all alumni. Alumni volunteers play an impor- 
tant role in the annual giving campaign. 



Atiiletics 

Graduate students are encouraged to make use of the North 
Campus athletic complex. Facilities include three basketball 
courts, handball-paddleball court, weight room with universal 
gym, a multipurpose exercise room, steam room, fully equipped 
training room, six tennis courts, two softball fields, baseball dia- 
mond and combination football-soccer-lacrosse field. 

Graduate students are eligible to take part in the intramural 
competition in touch football, badminton, bowling, three- and 
five-player basketball, paddleball, softball, tennis, floor hockey 
and volleyball. 



Boolcstore 

The university's bookstore provides all necessary texts, new 
and used, that are required for courses at the university. It also 
carries related supplies, greeting cards, imprinted clothing, gifts, 
candy and a selection of paperbacks, newspapers and periodi- 
cals. The bookstore buys back used texts on a daily basis 
throughout the year. It also orders class rings and handles film 
processing for the campus community. 

Special arrangements are made for students taking courses at 
off -campus locations to purchase required books at or near off- 
campus centers. 



19 



Career development and 
off-campus employment office 

The Career Development Office offers individual counseling; 
special workshops on resume preparation, interviewing skills and 
job research techniques; as well as a monthly professional career 
testing service. Many employers conduct job interviews at the 
Career Development Office throughout the year, and a monthly 
schedule is printed in the alumni publication, Insight. 



Computer faculties 

The university Computer Center provides time-sharing and 
batch processing of jobs for both academic and administrative 
functions at the university. 

The center maintains two independent, yet totally compat- 
ible, processing units. One system is dedicated solely to academic 
usage. The other handles administrative functions. 

The center also supports another three computers: 1) a 
TRS-80 (LEVEL II BASIC); 2) an APPLE II micro-computer; 3) a 
NOVA 2 minicomputer with interactive graphics. 

The center's academic system provides training in many 
computer languages to over 1,000 students in related programs. 
Training in the usage, programming and debugging of programs 
on interactive terminals and microcomputers is stressed. 



Counseling 

Individual counseling is offered to students for personal 
problems, for marital and domestic problems and for study and 
career choice problems. Students can obtain assistance for educa- 
tional, vocational and general life problems. 

The center offers psychological testing including vocational 
interest, personality assessment and academic placement. 



Graduate student council 

The Graduate Student Council is a forum where graduate 
students can provide input to the administration in order to 
improve all aspects of graduate education at the university. The 
council schedules a number of extracurricular activities, and all 
graduate students are encouraged to attend. 



20 



Handicapped services 

The Office of Handicapped Services provides guidance and 
assistance to students with physical handicaps. The office also 
coordinates the university's compliance with section 504 of the 
H.E.W. Rehabilitation Act of 1973. All inquiries and problems 
concerning barrier-free access to university facilities should be 
addressed to this office. 



Housing 

The Office of Resident Services, located in the Student 
Center, will assist graduate students in finding off-campus hous- 
ing accommodations. The office is open from 8:30-4:30, Mon- 
day through Friday, for any student wishing to find housing 
accommodations. The office has listings for apartments, houses 
and private rooms. 



International students 

Students from a number of countries belong to the Univer- 
sity of New Haven student body. The Office of International 
Student Affairs provides assistance in the following areas: all 
documentation pertaining to the Immigration and Naturalization 
Service; school transfers from and to UNH; orientation programs 
for international students; referral service for agencies that assist 
internationals; and the friendship family program. 



Library 

The Marvin K. Peterson Library, named in honor of the 
former president of the university, was opened in 1974. It has a 
capacity of 300,000 bound volumes. Adjoining the Main Build- 
ing, it includes special collection rooms, a music room, archives 
and spacious reading and reference areas. Study is made conven- 
ient by modern research facilities and equipment including 
microreading stations and micro-reader-printers. 

The library contains more than 200,000 volumes, 75,000 
U.S. government documents, 8,000 record albums, numerous 
corporate annual reports, pamphlet files and microfilm. The 
library subscribes to 1,100 periodicals, and extensive back issue 
files are maintained. 

The resources of both the New Haven and West Haven pub- 
lic libraries are available to students (nonresidents must pay a 
fee). Under a reciprocal arrangement. University of New Haven 



21 



students may borrow materials from the libraries of Albertus 
Magnus College or Quinnipiac College by presenting a valid 
identity card. 



Minority student affairs 

The Office of Minority Affairs represents the need and inter- 
ests of minority students at the University of New Haven. The 
office works closely with minority students to ease the transition 
into the academic environment while enabling the student to 
maintain cultural pride and heritage. The office also promotes 
social and cultural activities which are of special interest to 
minority students. 



Publications 

Student publications include The News, the university stu- 
dent newspaper; The Chariot, the annual yearbook; The 
Noiseless Spider, a literary publication; and the Student Hand- 
hook. Students may volunteer their services on any of the stu- 
dent publications. 



Veterans affairs 

Since the university has one of the largest veteran enroll- 
ments in Connecticut, an Office of Veterans Affairs with a full- 
time staff is maintained. In addition to processing applications 
for various V.A. benefits, the campus Veterans Office provides a 
wide range of supportive services for veterans attending the 
university. Assistance is available in academic areas, and special 
help such as funding for tutorial assistance, readers for the blind 
and aid for the disabled is also available. 



WNHU radio 

WNHU, the university's student-operated FM stereo broad- 
cast facility, operates throughout the year on a frequency of SS.l 
MHz at a power of 1,700 watts. This extracurricular activity, 
open to all university students, serves southern Connecticut with 
music, news and community affairs programming. Its sports- 
casters are the voice of University of New Haven Charger 
sport teams. 



22 



23 




UNH graduate students learn 
by doing. Here, members of 
a collective bargaining class 
simulate a labor negotiating 
session. 



24 



Academic Programs 



Accounting 

Coordinator: Anne J. Rich, C.P.A., C.M.A.; Ph.D., University 
of Massachusetts 

The overall objective of the master of science in accounting 
program is to provide a framev^ork for accounting inquiry, 
devised in structure and content from the entire scope and 
process of accounting-information-based economic decision mak- 
ing. The existence of such a framework is intended to provide 
for graduate accountants and professional practitioners an 
opportunity to share in the development and assessment of issues 
of accounting interest within a decision-making context. Accord- 
ingly, the M.S. program is structured to receive its objective and 
direction from the overall objective of accounting - providing 
information useful to the process of economic decision making. 

To accomplish this objective, the M.S. program offers a 
structure of studies designed to provide: 

1. an examination of the foundations of economic decision 
making (foundation courses, 18 credits); 

2. an analysis of the role and usefulness of accounting infor- 
mation for economic decision making (core courses, 15 
credits); and 

3. an opportunity for further selected specialization from the 
generally recognized branches or divisions of accounting 
inquiry (electives, 9 credits). 

Each student, upon entering the program, will be assigned a 
faculty adviser who will assist the student throughout the pro- 
gram of study, particularly with the selection of suitable elec- 
tives. The assigned faculty adviser will also act as, or assist in 
the selection of, the student's thesis adviser. 

Admission policy 

Admission to the program is open to persons holding an 
undergraduate degree from an accredited institution, preferably, 
but not exclusively, in accounting or in business administration 
with a major in accounting. Persons holding other than the 
above degrees will be required to take a number of selected 
undergraduate courses. Admission is based primarily on an 



25 



applicant's undergraduate record; however, the promise of 
academic success is the essential factor for admission. In support 
of their applications, persons may submit their scores from the 
GMAT. An applicant may be required to take this test. 



Requirements for the degree 
Master of science in accounting 

A minimum total of 42 credits on the graduate level will be 
required to earn the master of science in accounting. In addition, 
selected undergraduate courses in accounting may be required of 
students not holding an undergraduate degree in accounting. 
Individual programs of study are determined after a conference 
with the coordinator. 

Thesis 

All students are required to write a thesis. The thesis must 
show ability to organize material in a clear and original manner 
and present well-reasoned conclusions. 

The complete and final manuscript must be submitted to the 
thesis adviser prior to the end of the tenth week of the term in 
which the candidate expects to complete the requirements for the 
degree. Thesis preparation and submission must comply with 
the Graduate School policy on Thesis detailed elsewhere in 
this bulletin. 



Program of study 
Required courses 

Course number and title Credit 

Foundation courses 

EC 604 Macroeconomic Analysis 3 

EC 603 Microeconomic Analysis 3 

FI 651 Portfolio Management and Capital 

Market Analysis 3 

FI 615 Finance 3 

MG 637 Management 3 

QA 604 Probability and Statistics ^ 

18 



26 



Core courses 

A 650 Advanced Accounting Theory 3 

A 621 Managerial Accounting 3 

A 654 Financial Statements: Reporting and Analysis ... 3 
A 698 Thesis ._6 

15 
Electives 9 

Total 42 

Elective courses 

Financial accounting specialization 

A 651 Financial Accounting Seminar 

A 652 Advanced Auditing 

A 653 Accounting for the Not-for-Profit Organizations 

A 656 International Accounting 

FI 649 Security Analysis 

Managerial accounting specialization 

A 661 Managerial Accounting Seminar 

A 641 Accounting Information Systems 

A 642 Operational Auditing 

FI 645 Corporate Financial Theory 

Taxation specialization 

A 601 Federal Income Taxation I 
A 602 Federal Income Taxation II 
A 604 Corporate Income Taxation I 



Business Administration 

Coordinator: William S. Y. Pan, Associate Dean, School of 
Business Administration; Associate Professor of Management 
Science, Ph.D., Columbia University 

The general purpose of the M.B.A. program at the Univer- 
sity of New Haven is the education of men and women at the 
graduate level for careers in business administration as well as 
other job areas requiring a sound grasp of business principles. 
The overall objective of the program is to enhance the student's 
perspective of managerial skills. 



27 



The program has been designed to develop a professional 
point of view in managing an organization. It further develops 
the student's ability to utilize the newest analytical and quan- 
titative techniques used in corporate decision making. The stu- 
dent is also exposed to an in-depth analysis of various theories of 
business and managerial behavior, emphasizing the business 
organization in relation to its internal and external environment. 

Another important objective of the program is to afford the 
student an opportunity to develop special skills by concentrating 
in a given study area. 



Requirements for the degree 
Master of business administration 

A total of 48 credits, with or without a thesis, is required of 
candidates for the M.B.A. degree. 

Candidates for the M.B.A. degree are urged to write a thesis 
as part of the requirement for the degree. A thesis student has 
the opportunity to work with a faculty member on a mutually 
determined research project. Candidates who elect not to write a 
thesis must take two additional business courses in place of a 
thesis. 

Students in the M.B.A. program are expected to be familiar 
with the use of computers in solving problems. The use of a 
computer is required in a number of courses in the M.B.A. pro- 
gram. Students deficient in this area should register for IE 603C, 
Introduction to Digital Computers: COBOL. Students wishing to 
learn FORTRAN should register for IE 603F. However, a student 
will only be granted graduate credit for either IE 603C or 
IE 603F, not both. 

A student must complete the basic core before taking 
advanced courses in the M.B.A. program. The basic core con- 
sists of QA 604, QA 605 and two from among P 619, MG 637, 
EC 603, EC 604, EC 625 and A621. A student whose 
undergraduate degree is in a nonbusiness area may also be 
required, unless a waiver is granted, to take A 600, EC 600 and 
QA 600, which are noncredit graduate-level courses. 

Waiver policy 

Core courses in the M.B.A. program may be waived on the 
basis of undergraduate courses taken at accredited institutions. 
For a course to be waived, a student must first secure the written 



28 



approval of the department chairman or a faculty member acting 
for the chairman of the department in which the course is 
offered. 

A course that has been waived cannot be taken for elective 
credit. 

Thesis 

Students electing to write a thesis must register for thesis in 
the appropriate business department. The thesis must show abil- 
ity to organize material in a clear and original manner and pre- 
sent well-reasoned conclusions. 

The thesis is written under the direction of the faculty 
member in charge of the departmental thesis program or a fac- 
ulty member with special competence in the subject matter 
covered by the thesis. The complete and final manuscript must 
be submitted to the thesis adviser prior to the end of the tenth 
week of the term in which the student expects to complete the 
requirements for the degree. Thesis preparation and submission 
must comply with the Graduate School policy on Thesis detailed 
elsewhere in this bulletin. 



Program of study 
Required courses 

Course number and title Credit 

EC 603 Microeconomic Analysis 3 

EC 604 Macroeconomic Analysis 3 

QA 604 Probability and Statistics 3 

QA 605 Advanced Statistics 3 

MK 609 Marketing 3 

FI 615 Finance 3 

MG 637 Management* 3 

P 619 Organizational Behavior 3 

A 621 Managerial Accounting 3 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 3 

Thesis** 6 

Electives 12 

48 

*Students in the Health Care Management Concentration take 
MG 640 in place of MG 637. 
**Candidates who elect not to write a thesis must take two 
additional business courses in place of thesis. 



29 



Concentrations 

Within the master of business administration program, 
students are allowed to concentrate their studies in a specific 
area. There are several structured concentrations offered by 
various departments. 

A concentration consists of four courses taken in one area. 
With the permission of the adviser, students may substitute other 
appropriate courses for those listed as part of a concentration. 

Accounting 

Adviser: Anne Rich, Associate Professor of Accounting, 
Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 

A 650 Advanced Accounting Theory 
A 661 Managerial Accounting Seminar 

plus any two accounting or taxation electives* 

Computer and information science 

Adviser: William S. Gere Jr., Professor of Industrial Engineering 
Ph.D., Carnegie-Mellon University 

four courses from the following: 

Introduction to Digital Computers 
Management Systems 
Advanced Business Programming 
Advanced Technical Programming 
Computer Systems Selection 
Data Information Systems 

Economic forecasting 

Adviser: John J. Teluk, Professor of Economics, M.A., Free 
University of Munich 

Forecasting 

Econometrics 

Introduction to Digital Computers: FORTRAN 

and one of the following: 

Managerial Economics 

Advanced Technical Programming 

Urban and Regional Economic Development 

Research Project 

Marketing Research and Information Systems 



IE 


603 


IE 


604 


IE 


605 


IE 


606 


IE 


610 


IE 


614 



QA 


607 


EC 


653 


IE 


603F 


MG 633 


IE 


606 


EC 


665 


EC 


690 


MK 639 



30 



FI 


645 


FI 


617 


FI 


649 


FI 


655 


FI 


661 


FI 


619 


FI 


620 



Finance 

Adviser: Anne Rich 

FI 651 Portfolio Management and Capital 
Market Analysis 
Corporate Financial Theory 
Financial Institutions and Capital Markets 

and one of the following: * 

Security Analysis 
Commodity Market Analysis 
Real Estate: Principles and Practices 
Monetary and Central Banking Policy 
Working Capital Management 
and Planning 
FI 670 Selected Topics 

Health care management 

Adviser: Kenneth Fox, Assistant Professor of Public 
Administration; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

MG 640 Management of Health Care Organizations (this 
course to be taken in place of MG 637 in the core 
of the M.B.A. program) 

and four courses from the following: 

Health Care Delivery Systems 
Health Care Economics and Finance 
Health and Institutional Planning 
Law and the Public Health 
Administration of Programs and Services 

for the Aged 
PA 641 Financial Management of Health Care 

Organizations 

* Candidates who elect not to write a thesis must substitute with 
written approval two elective courses. Elective courses are to be 
chosen in consultation with an accounting adviser or finance 
adviser. 



PA 


642 


PA 


645 


PA 


643 


PS 


635 


PA 


644 



31 



Hospitality administration 

Adviser: Ronald A. Usiewicz, Associate Professor of 
Hotel Management, Ph.D., Kent State University 

Admission to the concentration in hospitality administration 
requires permission of the concentration adviser; certain 
undergraduate courses may be required. 

four courses from the following: 

HM 610 Content Seminar in Hospitality /Institutional/ 

Tourism Administration 
HM 625 Supervisory and Leadership Analysis in Tourism, 

Hospitality and Institutional Operations 
HM 630 Personnel and Labor Relations in the Tourism/ 

Hospitality /Institutional Fields 
HM 635 Applied Dietetics for Health Care Professionals 
HM 640 Haute Cuisine for Hospitality Executives 
HM 655 Development of Hotel /Restaurant /Institutional 

Food Services 

Human resource management 

Adviser: Gene F. Brady, Associate Professor of Management 
Science, Ph.D., University of Oregon 

four from the following: 

MG 645 Management of Human Resources 
MG 665 Compensation Administration 
MG 678 Personnel Management Seminar 
MG 679 Industrial Relations Seminar 
MG 690 /PA 690-1 Research in Human Resource 

Management 
MG 695-6 /PA 695-6 Independent Study in Human 

Resource Management 

NOTE: Course substitutions are permitted depending on the 
background of the student and subject to the approval of the 
adviser. Among the courses which may be substituted are: 
P 627, P 628, P 641, PA 620, EC 625, EC 627 and EC 687. 



32 



International business 



Ad^ 


/iseT: 


Ph.D., 


IB 


643 


MG 


; 660 


IB 


651 


IB 


652 


IB 


644 


EC 


641 



Arvin F. Rodrigues, Assistant Professor of Marketing, 
Columbia University 

four courses from the following: 

International Business Operations 
Comparative Management 
Comparative Marketing 
Multinational Business Operations 
Import and Export Business 
International Economics 



Management and organization 

Adviser: Gene F. Brady 

four courses from the following: 

MG 660 Comparative Management 

MG 661 Development of Management Thought 

MG 662 Organization Theory 

MG 663 Leadership in Organizations 

MG 664 Organizational Effectiveness 

MG 669 Business Policy and Strategy 

MG 680 Current Topics in Business Administration 

MG 675 Readings in Management 

MG 638 Cost-Benefit Management 

Management science 

Adviser: Gene F. Brady 

IE 601 Introduction to Operations Research/ 

Management Science 
IE 604 Management Systems 
QA 606 Advanced Management Science 
QA 607 Forecasting 

Marketing 

Adviser: Arvin F. Rodrigues 

MK 639 Marketing Research and Information Systems 
MK 641 Marketing Management 
MK 643 Product Management 

One other course in marketing 



33 



Media in business 

Adviser: Marilou McLaughlin, Professor of 

Communication, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

CO 601 is a prerequisite to CO 613. 

CO 601 Basics of Business Media Production Techniques 

CO 605 Planning Audio Visual Systems for Business 

CO 609 Scripting the Media Presentation 

CO 613 Media Presentations for Business 

Operations research 

Adviser: William S. Gere Jr. 

IE 607 Probability Theory 

IE 621 Linear Programming 

IE 622 Queuing Theory 

IE 686 Inventory Analysis 



Hospitality Administration 

Coordinator: Ronald A. Usiewicz, Associate Professor of Hotel 
Management, Tourism and Travel, Ph.D., Kent State University 

This program, leading to the master of business administra- 
tion degree with the hospitality administration option, is 
designed for those who have completed an undergraduate degree 
program in hospitality administration or a related major. The 
student who is not an undergraduate hospitality graduate will be 
permitted to complete the required undergraduate course work 
while satisfying the requirements for the M.B.A. 

Thesis 

Students electing to write a thesis must obtain the approval 
of the coordinator for a proposal prior to registration. The thesis 
must demonstrate ability to organize material in a clear and 
original manner and present well-reasoned conclusions. 

The thesis is written under the direction of the faculty 
member in charge of the departmental thesis program or a fac- 
ulty member with special competence in the subject matter 
covered by the thesis. The complete and final manuscript must 
be submitted to the thesis adviser prior to the end of the tenth 
week of the term in which the student expects to complete the 
requirements for the degree. 

Thesis preparation and submission must comply with the 
Graduate School policy on Thesis detailed elsewhere in this 
bulletin. 



34 



Program of study 
Required courses 

Course number and title Credit 

EC 603 Microeconomic Analysis 3 

EC 604 Macroeconomic Analysis 3 

QA 604 Probability and Statistics 3 

MK 609 Marketing 3 

PI 615 Finance 3 

MG 637 Management 3 

P 619 Organizational Behavior 3 

A 621 Managerial Accounting 3 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 3 

HM 698 Thesis* 6 

Electives* * 3 

36 
Core courses 

HM 610 Content Seminar in Hospitality/ 

Institutional /Tourism Administration 3 

HM 640 Haute Cuisine for Hospitality Executives 3 

HM 655 Development of Hotel /Restaurant/ 

Institutional Food Services 3 

HM 690 Research in Tourism/Hospitality/ 

Institutional Administration 3 

12 

Elective courses** 

HM 625 Supervisory and Leadership Analysis in 

Tourism/ Hospitality/ Institutional Fields 

HM 630 Personnel and Labor Relations in the 

Tourism/ Hospitality/ Institutional Fields 

HM 635 Applied Dietetics for Health Care Professionals 

*Candidates who elect not to write a thesis may substitute two 
approved courses in the areas of hospitality, institutional food 
service, tourism administration or business. 

Elective courses are to be chosen in consultation with an adviser. 



* * 



Possible additional undergraduate 
course requirements 

Those candidates who have not completed undergraduate 
hospitality degree programs will be required to complete 24 to 36 
credits of undergraduate hospitality administration courses. 
These courses will depend upon background in the field, work 
experience and related course work completed. 

The Undergraduate Bulletin of the university lists descrip- 
tions of these courses. 

35 



Business Administration/ 
Industrial Engineering 
Dual degree program 



Coordinator: William S. Gere Jr., Professor of Industrial 
Engineering, Ph.D., Carnegie-Mellon University. 

The Graduate School has always encouraged inter- 
disciplinary studies. To foster a broader expertise in the areas of 
business administration and industrial engineering, a student can 
now earn both the master of business administration and the 
master of science in industrial engineering by successfully com- 
pleting the Dual Degree Program. The program is intended for 
students with undergraduate engineering or technical degrees 
from ECPD accredited schools. 



Requirements for the dual degree 
Master of business administration/master 
of science in industrial engineering 

The basic M.B.A./M.S.I.E. program consists of 72 credit 
hours. Up to 12 of these credit hours may be waived on the basis 
of undergraduate course work, leaving a minimum requirement 
of 60 credit hours. All waivers must be approved in writing by 
the appropriate department and are conditional upon subsequent 
academic performance. 

Graduate credit may be transferred from other accredited 
institutions subject to the Graduate School policy on transfer 
credit detailed elsewhere in this bulletin. In all cases, the 
residence requirement for the two degrees shall be 60 credit 
hours completed at the University of New Haven. In addition, a 
minimum of 21 credit hours must be earned in business courses 
and a minimum of 21 credit hours must be earned in engineering 
courses. 

Thesis 

All students must write either a thesis or a seminar project. 
The thesis or project must show ability to organize material in a 
clear and original manner and present well-reasoned conclusions. 

The thesis /project is written under the direction of the fac- 
ulty member in charge of the departmental program or a faculty 
member with special competence in the subject matter covered 



36 



by the thesis/ project. The complete and final manuscript must 
be submitted to the thesis /project adviser prior to the end of the 
tenth week of the term in which the candidate expects to com- 
plete the requirements for the degree. 

Thesis preparation and submission must comply with Grad- 
uate School policy on Thesis Requirements detailed elsewhere in 
this bulletin. 



Program of study 
Required courses 

Course number and title Credit 

A 621 Managerial Accounting 3 

FI 615 Finance 3 

MK 609 Marketing 3 

QA 605 Advanced Statistics 3 

MG 637 Management 3 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 3 

EC 603 Microeconomic Analysis 3 

EC 604 Macroeconomic Analysis 3 

P 619 Organizational Behavior, or 

P 620 Industrial Psychology 3 

IE 601 Introduction to Operations Research/ 

Management Science 3 

IE 624 Quality Analysis 3 

IE 603F Introduction to Digital Computers (FORTRAN) . 3 

IE 604 Management Systems 3 

IE 607 Probability Theory 3 

IE 621 Linear Programming 3 

IE 651 Human Engineering I 3 

IE 686 Inventory Analysis 3 

Electives (Business) 6 

Electives (IE or Math) 6 

63 

plus either: 

Project (Business or IE) 3 

Electives (Unrestricted) 6 

or: 

Thesis 6 

Electives (Unrestricted) 3 

_9 

72 



37 



Community Psychology 

Coordinator: Robert J. Hoffnung, Associate Professor of 
Psychology, Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 

Community psychology begins with the assumption that 
human problems occur within a social context and that the most 
effective interventions into these problems are those which take 
place within a community framework. 

Accordingly, the M.A. program in community psychology 
provides broad training in current approaches to preventing and 
treating psychological distress at the level of social institutions, 
organizations and groups rather than just the individual. 
Methods of community analysis, consultation and crisis interven- 
tion are considered as well as program development, administra- 
tion and evaluation. 

Classroom study is closely integrated with supervised field 
experiences in a variety of human service organizations and com- 
munity settings. 

Graduates are able to assume positions of responsibility in a 
broad range of human service settings, such as mental health 
programs, youth service bureaus, community houses, child 
development programs, municipal services, halfway houses, 
senior citizens centers, private agencies, health care systems and 
community action programs. 

We welcome full- and part-time students with varying 
degrees of human service experience. 

Admission policy 

An undergraduate degree from an accredited institution is 
required. A major in psychology is preferred but not required. 
However, all students are expected to have at least an introduc- 
tory level understanding of psychological concepts, principles 
and methods before entering. Students who have not had an 
undergraduate course in statistical methods will be required to 
take one before entry into P 609. We prefer students with strong 
academic records but welcome applications from students whose 
work and related experiences suggest potential for success in 
community psychology. 

Applicants are required to submit materials directly to the 
Graduate School. They may be required to submit scores from 
either the Miller Analogies Test or the Graduate Record Exam- 
inations Aptitude Test, at the discretion of the department. Stu- 
dents intending to go on for further graduate work are strongly 
encouraged to take the GRE early in the first year. 



38 



Requirements for the degree 

Master of arts in community psychology 

The program consists of 42 credit hours, 27 of which are of 
the core curriculum completed by all students and 12 of which 
constitute one of two areas of concentration. On entering the 
program each student chooses one of the concentration options. 
Typically, students complete most of the core requirements 
before focusing on their concentration. 

Each of concentration areas is designed to enable the student 
to specialize in one major component of the core curriculum. 
The Community Organization and Program Consultation Con- 
centration emphasizes social system analysis and change, grass 
roots organizing, and the development and administration of 
traditional and non-traditional programs and service settings. 
The Community Mental Health Concentration focuses on the 
interplay between direct, clinically-oriented services and indirect 
services, with special stress on the comprehensive community 
mental health center and the psychological clinic as service 
delivery settings. 



Program of study 
Required courses 

Course number and title Credit 

P 605 Survey of Community Psychology 3 

P 607 Special Problems in Community Psychology ... 3 

P 609 Research Methods 3 

P 610 Program Evaluation in Community Psychology 3 
P 611 Practicum Seminar I: 

The Dyadic Relationship 3 

P 614 Field Work I 2 

P 612 Practicum Seminar II: 

Models of Consultation 3 

P 615 Field Work II 2 

P 613 Practicum Seminar III: 

Systems Intervention 3 

P 616 Field Work III 2 

27 

Elective 3 

Concentration 12 

42 



39 



Community organization and program 
administration concentration* 

P 619 Organizational Behavior 3 

P 623 Psychology of the Small Group 3 

P 631 Social Psychology 3 

P 642 Organizational Change and Development 3 

P 650 Ecological Psychology 3 

PA 604 Seminar in Communities and Social Change ... 3 



12 



12 



Community mental health concentration* 

P 621 Behavior Modification 3 

P 625 Developmental Psychology 3 

P 628 The Interview 3 

P 629 Introduction to Counseling 3 

P 632 Group Dynamics and Group Treatment 3 

P 634 Personality Assessment 3 

P 636 Abnormal Psychology 3 

*Students will choose 4 courses from those offered within a 
single concentration. 

Practicum seminars and field worl< 

Supervised field experience in a variety of settings represents 
a major component of the M.A. program in community 
psychology. Students plan their field work activities under the 
guidance of both the program's field placement coordinator and 
their superviser from the field setting. In order to maximize the 
potential for learning inherent in these experiences all students 
take practicum seminars whose content reflects the focus of their 
field work activities. These seminars enable students to concep- 
tualize within a broader theoretical framework issues which they 
encounter in the field. 

Students with a year or more of appropriate full-time 
human service experience in a particular field work area will be 
allowed to substitute an elective for the field work, contingent 
upon approval of the program coordinator. All students are 
required to take the three practicum seminars. 

Tliesis 

Students who elect to write a thesis must register for P 698, 
Thesis I, and P 699, Thesis II. The thesis must show ability to 
organize materials in a clear and original manner and present 
well-reasoned conclusions. A thesis is strongly recommended for 
students wishing to pursue doctoral training after graduation. 



40 



The thesis is written under the direction of the faculty 
member in charge of the thesis seminar or a faculty member with 
special competence in the subject area of the thesis. The complete 
and final manuscript must be submitted to the thesis adviser 
prior to the end of the tenth week of the term in which the can- 
didate expects to complete the requirements for the degree. 

Transfer credit 

Transfer credit may be given for graduate course work com- 
pleted at other accredited institutions, subject to the Graduate 
School policy detailed elsewhere in this bulletin. 



Computer and Information 
Science 



Coordinator: William S. Gere Jr., Professor of Industrial 
Engineering, Ph.D., Carnegie-Mellon University 

The master of science in computer and information science 
curriculum is an interdisciplinary program with a software orien- 
tation. It is designed to provide a high-level academic 
background for CIS managers and systems analysts in all career 
areas. A wide selection of electives allows students to concen- 
trate in either technical or business applications. 



Requirements for the degree 
Master of science in computer 
and Information science 

The basic program consists of 48 credit hours. Required 
courses may be waived on the basis of undergraduate courses 
taken at accredited institutions. 

All waivers must be approved in writing by the industrial 
engineering department, and are conditional upon subsequent 
academic performance. The transfer of credit from other institu- 
tions will be permitted subject to the Graduate School policy on 
transfer credit detailed elsewhere in this bulletin. 

For students with little background in computers and pro- 
gramming (no more than one prior course), IE 602, Computing 
Fundamentals is required; elective credit will be awarded for the 
course. 



41 



Seminar project 

The program requires all students to complete IE 690 
Seminar Project. This requirement is met by the preparation of a 
relevant seminar project report, prepared under the direction of a 
faculty adviser. The complete and final manuscript must be sub- 
mitted to the project adviser prior to the end of the tenth week 
of the term in which the candidate expects to complete the 
requirements for the degree. For further specifications, see 
Research Projects, Seminar Projects and Independent Study 
Requirements detailed elsewhere in this bulletin. It is suggested 
that a student begin work on the seminar project after having 
completed at least 15 credit hours. 

In certain cases, students who routinely complete projects 
similar to the required Seminar Project as a part of their profes- 
sional duties may petition to satisfy the Seminar Project require- 
ment by taking two advanced industrial engineering electives in 
place of the project. Such a substitution must have the prior 
written approval of the program coordinator. 



Program of study 
Required courses 

Course number and title Credit 

IE 603C Introduction to Digital Computers (COBOL), or 
IE 603F Introduction to Digital Computers (FORTRAN) 3 
M 610 Fundamentals of Calculus and Linear Algebra . . 3 

IE 604 Management Systems 3 

IE 614 Data Information Systems 3 

EE 615 Introduction to Computer Logic 3 

IE 601 Introduction to Operations Research/ 

Management Science 3 

IE 605 Advanced Business Programming, or 

IE 606 Advanced Technical Programming 3 

IE 610 Computer Systems Selection 3 

IE 690 Seminar Project 3 

Electives (I.E., Math, or E.E.) 9 

Electives 12 

48 



42 



Criminal Justice 



Director: Richard E. Farmer, Assistant Professor of Criminal 
Justice, Ed. D., Boston University 

The President's Commission on Law Enforcement and 
Administration of Justice assigned a high priority to the task of 
improving the education and training of personnel entrusted with 
the administration of criminal justice in the United States. 

A key objective of the master of science in criminal justice 
program is the training and education of men and women plan- 
ning careers in the field of criminal justice as well as the 
advanced training and education of the men and women who 
staff the agencies and institutions of the criminal justice system. 

The university views the criminal justice system as one con- 
tinuous integrated process from a study of the nature of deviant 
behavior to the role of rehabilitation and parole. 

The program stresses a broad understanding of the social 
and behavioral sciences, the institutions of the criminal justice 
system, and the development of methodological tools and skills. 
This is done somewhat at the expense of courses that are nar- 
rowly professional in the belief that the field of criminal justice is 
dynamic and that a broad understanding of the social and 
behavioral sciences and the methodological skills and tools will 
prove more valuable to a student's career in the long run than 
narrow professional training. 

The broad fields of the criminal justice program at the 
university are social and behavioral science, the institutions of 
the criminal justice system and methodological tools and skills. 

The courses in the area of social and behavioral science 
stress the theories of the behavior of man in a social order and 
the sanctions imposed by different societies to control the social 
behavior of their members. 

Courses in the area of criminal justice institutions stress the 
study of the existing system from the police, through the courts, 
the penitentiaries, and the system of probation and parole. 

The methodological courses expose students to the tools of 
research and analysis and the contribution of systems analysis to 
the efficient administration of the criminal justice system. 

Admission policy 

In addition to the general Graduate School admission 
requirements, all criminal justice applicants must take the Apti- 
tude Test of the Graduate Record Examination or the Miller 
Analogies Test as part of the admission procedure. GRE applica- 
tions are available in the Graduate Office or by writing directly 



43 



to the Educational Testing Service, Princeton, N.J. Miller 
Analogies Test may be taken at the UNH Counseling Center. 
Applicants are also required to complete a questionnaire to be 
submitted directly to the Graduate School. 



Requirements for the degree 
Master of science in criminal justice 

A total of 45 credit hours is required of candidates for the 
degree of master of science of criminal justice. 

Candidates must complete required credit hours of required 
courses in the core curriculum. After consultation with their 
adviser, students select credit hours of electives from approved 
courses in the departments of criminal justice, economics, 
psychology, political science, sociology, industrial engineering 
and management science. 

The transfer of credit from other institutions will be per- 
mitted subject to the Graduate School policy on transfer credit 
detailed elsewhere in this bulletin. 

Thesis 

Students electing to write a thesis must register for thesis 
with the department. The thesis must show ability to organize 
material in a clear and original manner and present well- 
reasoned conclusions. 

The thesis is written under the direction of the faculty 
member in charge of the departmental thesis program or a fac- 
ulty member with special competence in the subject matter 
covered by the thesis. The complete and final manuscript must 
be submitted to the thesis adviser prior to the end of the tenth 
week of the term in which the student expects to complete the 
requirements for the degree. 

Thesis preparation and submission must comply with the 
Graduate School policy on Thesis detailed elsewhere in this 
bulletin. 



44 



Program of study 
Required courses 

Course number and title Credit 

CJ 601 Seminar in Interpersonal Relations 3 

CJ 605 Social Deviance 3 

CJ 610 Administration of Justice 3 

CJ 628 Introduction to Systems Theory 3 

CJ 635 Statistics in the Public Sector 3 

CJ 637 Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice 3 

CJ 642 Research Techniques in the Social Sciences 3 

Electives (Approved) 24 

45 



Concentrations 

In addition to the master of science degree program in 
criminal justice, there are two concentrations that a student may 
choose to elect. 

Concentration in criminal justice management 

This concentration is designed for those individuals wishing 
to pursue a career in the management of a criminal justice 
agency. Courses are offered jointly between the Division of 
Criminal Justice and the Department of Public Administration. 

Required courses 

Course Number and Title Credit 

CJ 601 Seminar in Interpersonal Relations 3 

CJ 610 Administration of Justice 3 

CJ 612 Criminal Justice Management 3 

CJ 628 Introduction to Systems Theory 3 

CJ 635 Statistics in the Public Sector 3 

CJ 642 Research Techniques in the Social Sciences 3 

CJ 655 Bureaucratic Organization of Criminal Justice . . 3 

PA 602 Public Policy Formulation and Implementation . 3 

PA 604 Seminar in Communities and Social Change ... 3 

PA 620 Personnel Administration and Collective 

Bargaining in the Public Sector 3 

PA 632 Public Finance and Budgeting 3 

Electives (Approved) 12 

45 



45 



Concentration in correctional counseling 

This program, offered jointly between the Division of 
Criminal Justice and the Department of Psychology, is designed 
for those individuals currently in correctional counseling posi- 
tions or those who anticipate a career in correctional counseling. 

Required courses 

Course Name and Title Credit 

CJ 601 Seminar in Interpersonal Relations 3 

CJ 610 Administration of Justice 3 

CJ 622 Learning Theory: Applications in 

Criminal Justice 3 

CJ 624 Group Process in Criminal Justice 3 

CJ 693 Criminal Justice Internship I 3 

P 611 Practicum Seminar I: 

The Dyadic Relationship 3 

P 618 Community Mental Health Philosophy 

and Concepts 3 

P 628 The Interview 3 

P 629 Introduction to Counseling 3 

Electives* - Criminal Justice 9 

Elective* - Psychology 9 

45 

* Electives will be chosen by consent of adviser. Students may be 
required to take CJ 694 - Internship II, depending upon experi- 
ence, ability, and background. 



46 



Electrical Engineering 



Coordinator: Gerald J. Kirwin, Professor of Electrical 
Engineering, Ph.D., Syracuse University 

This program is intended to meet the needs of professionally 
employed engineers and scientists for academic work beyond the 
baccalaureate level. It has been designed to deepen the under- 
standing of modern analysis and synthesis techniques as they 
apply to engineering design. A major goal of this program is to 
provide a discussion of the characteristics of the latest devices 
and systems and of their applications in current engineering 
design. Both analytical and numerical procedures are developed 
with particular emphasis on the use of computers for problem 
solving and as elements in larger systems. 

The program centers on a core sequence which all students 
are expected to take. The core courses contain advanced methods 
of analysis and design which are of common interest to electrical 
engineers. Each student completes a program by electing courses 
that are particularly suited to current personal interests. In 
general the elective courses must be chosen from those listed 
below. Early in the program the student, with the help and 
approval of an adviser, prepares a detailed plan insuring an 
overall educational experience that is integrated and logical. All 
decisions regarding both core and elective courses are subject to 
the final approval of the student's adviser. 

Admission policy 

Admission to the program is open to persons holding an 
undergraduate engineering degree from an institution accredited 
by the Engineers Council for Professional Development (ECPD). 
Though admission decisions are based primarily on an 
applicant's undergraduate record, the promise of academic suc- 
cess is the essential factor for admission. 



Requirements for the degree 
Master of science in 
electrical engineering 

A minimum total of 39 credit hours must be completed to 
earn the master of science in electrical engineering degree. The 
transfer of credit from other institutions will be permitted subject 
to the Graduate School policy on transfer credit detailed 
elsewhere in this bulletin. 



47 



Thesis 

There is no specific thesis requirement for the master of 
science in electrical engineering. However, students are encour- 
aged to submit a thesis proposal covering applied research in an 
area of mutual interest to the student and a supervising member 
of the faculty. If a proposal shows promise of yielding a worth- 
while contribution to the professional objectives of the student, 
and a faculty member accepts the role of supervisor, the student 
may embark upon the research and earn 6 elective credits. 
Students electing to do a thesis project will be expected to make 
an oral presentation of the results of the project. 

The complete and final manuscript must be submitted to the 
thesis adviser prior to the end of the tenth week of the term in 
which the candidate expects to complete the requirements for the 
degree. Thesis preparation and submission must comply with the 
Graduate School policy on Thesis detailed elsewhere in this 
bulletin. 

The thesis is deposited permanently in the library. Students 
are required to submit two copies of the thesis for the library. 
Additional copies of the thesis are usually required. For this 
requirement and other regulations regarding the preparation of a 
thesis, students should consult the "Manual for the Preparation 
of Graduate Theses and Seminar Projects." Copies of the manual 
are available in the Graduate School office. 



Program of study 
Required courses 

Course number and title Credit 

M 624 Applied Mathematics 3 

M 632 Methods of Complex Analysis 3 

M 620 Numerical Analysis 3 

IE 685 Theory of Optimization 3 

EE 603 Discrete and Continuous Systems I 3 

EE 604 Discrete and Continuous Systems II 3 

EE 630 Electronic Instrumentation I 3 

EE 640 Computer Engineering I 3 

EE 650 Random Signal Analysis 3 

Electives (Approved) 12 

39 



48 



Elective courses 

EE 605 Modern Control Systems 

EE 608 Computer Aided Design 

EE 631 Electronic Instrumentation II 

EE 634 Digital Signal Processing I 

EE 635 Digital Signal Processing II 

EE 641 Computer Engineering II 

EE 645 Power Systems Engineering I 

EE 646 Power Systems Engineering II 

EE 658 Microprocessors-Theory and Applications 

EE 670 Special Topics -Electrical Engineering 

EE 695 Independent Study I 

EE 696 Independent Study II 

EE 698 Thesis I 

EE 699 Thesis II 



Environmental Engineering 



Coordinator: M. Hamdy Bechir, Associate Professor of Civil 
Engineering, Sc. D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

The environmental engineering program is intended to meet 
the needs of engineers for academic work beyond the bacca- 
laureate level. The program is interdisciplinary in nature and 
incorporates both engineering and science courses. 

There exists today a need for a substantial number of 
engineers knowledgeable in environmental areas. Industries 
which are required to control the pollution of air and' water need 
environmental engineers. Federal, state and local governments 
must hire employees and consultants to assist them in environ- 
mental matters. Other new vistas will undoubtedly open to the 
environmental engineers in the future. Environmental engineers 
will be in increasingly greater demand with the continually 
increasing problems of pollution. 

The recognition and solution of environmental problems are 
largely the responsibility of engineers and scientists. To perform 
effectively in this massive effort, they must be technically compe- 
tent as well as knowledgeable in social and economic matters. 

This program provides the advanced educational skills 
necessary to meet the ever increasing need for engineers with an 
environmental background. It is designed to offer vigorous, pro- 
fessionally oriented, engineering and science courses in the areas 
of solid waste, water and air pollution. 



49 



Approximately two-thirds of the program consists of a 
required sequence of courses which each student must complete. 
The balance of the program consists of courses selected from the 
list of electives. Selection will be based on the student's principal 
field of interest. Each student, upon entering this program, will 
be assigned a faculty adviser who will consult with the student 
during the program of study and will assist the student in selec- 
tion of suitable electives. The faculty adviser will also act as the 
student's research project adviser. 

Admission policy 

Candidates for admission in the environmental engineering 
program are expected to have an engineering degree from an 
institution accredited by the Engineers Council for Professional 
Development. 



Requirements for the degree 
Master of science in 
environmental engineering 

A total of 39 credit hours must be completed to earn the 
master of science in environmental engineering degree. The 
transfer of credit from other institutions will be permitted subject 
to the Graduate School policy on transfer credit detailed 
elsewhere in this bulletin. 

Program of study 
Required courses 

Course number and title Credit 

CE 601 Water Treatment 3 

CE 602 Wastewater Treatment 3 

CE 605 Solid Waste Management 3 

CE 606 Environmental Law and Legislation, or 

EC 608 Economics for Public Administrators 3 

CH 601 Environmental Chemistry 3 

SC 601 Ecology for Environmental Engineers 3 

SC 602 Pollutants and the Aquatic Environment, or 

SC 603 Air Pollution 3 

CE 612 Advanced Wastewater Treatment 3 

CE 613 Industrial Wastewater Control 3 

CE 690 Research Project 3 

Electives (CE) 3 

Electives (Approved) 6 

39 
50 



Environmental Sciences 



Coordinator: Dennis L. Kalma, Associate Professor of Science 
and Biology, Ph.D., Yale University 

The environmental sciences program is intended to meet the 
needs of scientists for academic work in environmental studies 
beyond the baccalaureate level. The program is interdisciplinary 
in nature and incorporates science and engineering courses. This 
program is designed to accommodate the student with a degree 
in one of the natural sciences. 

There exists today a need for a substantial number of scien- 
tists knowledgeable in environmental areas. Industries which are 
required to control the pollution of air and water need en- 
vironmental scientists. Federal, state and local governments must 
hire employees and consultants to assist them in environmental 
matters. Other new vistas will undoubtedly open to the en- 
vironmental scientists of the future. Environmental scientists will 
be in increasingly greater demand with the continually increasing 
problems of pollution. 

The recognition and solution of environmental problems are 
largely the responsibility of scientists and engineers. To perform 
effectively in this massive effort, they must be technically compe- 
tent as well as knowledgeable in social and economic matters. 

This program provides the advanced educational skills 
necessary to meet the ever increasing need for scientists with an 
environmental background. It is designed to offer vigorous, pro- 
fessionally oriented, science and engineering courses in the areas 
of solid waste, water and air pollution. 

Approximately two thirds of the program consists of a re- 
quired sequence of courses which each student must complete. 
The balance of the program consists of courses selected from a 
list of electives. Selection will be based on the student's principal 
field of interest. Each student, upon entering this program, will 
be assigned a faculty adviser who will consult with the student 
during the program of study and will assist in selection of 
suitable electives. 

Admission policy 

Candidates for admission to the environmental sciences pro- 
gram would be expected to have a degree in one of the natural 
sciences in which certain prerequisite courses have been com- 
pleted. Students without these courses would be admitted to the 
program after completing these prerequisites. 



51 



Requirements for the degree 
Master of science in 
environmental sciences 

A total of 42 credit hours must be completed to earn the 
master of science in environmental sciences degree. The transfer 
of credit earned at other institutions will be permitted subject to 
the Graduate School policy on transfer credit detailed elsewhere 
in this bulletin. 

Program of study 
Required courses 

Course number and title Credit 

CE 601 Water Treatment, or 

CE 602 Wastewater Treatment 3 

CE 605 Solid Waste Management 3 

CE 606 Environmental Law and Legislation, or 

EC 608 Economics for Public Administrators 3 

CH 601 Environmental Chemistry 3 

SC 601 Ecology for Environmental Engineers 3 

SC 602 Pollutants and the Aquatic Environment 3 

SC 603 Air Pollution 3 

SC 608 Water Quality 3 

SC 612 Freshwater and Marine Biology 3 

SC 698-9 Thesis I & II 6 

Electives (Approved) 9 

42 



Executive Master of 
Business Administration 



Director: John Moore, Assistant Professor of Management 
Science, Ph.D., Southern Illinois University 

The Graduate School and the School of Business Admin- 
istration offer an executive master of business administration 
(EMBA) degree for high-level executives with extensive 



52 



managerial experience. The program is designed specifically in 
consideration of managerial responsibilities and existing time 
constraints. 

The EMBA degree program is a two-year, part-time degree 
program organized to meet the educational needs and executive 
responsibilities of corporate and institutional leaders. Individual 
participation is emphasized through class discussions and 
cooperation with others in the class. Each class is generally 
limited to between 15 and 20 students. Class members commence 
and conclude the program as a group. 

No graduate transfer credit is accepted into the EMBA pro- 
gram. Admission to the EMBA degree program is by special 
application, the form for which may be obtained from the 
EMBA Program Director. Classes commence in September and 
January, providing a sufficient number of qualified applicants 
have applied from which proper selection may be made. An 
admission committee screens the applications to insure proper 
selection. Although students are required to complete the 
Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT), other important 
factors such as current position, length of top management 
experience and prior formal education are important factors in 
the selection process. The selection committee attempts to 
provide from among the applicants those individuals who will 
bring a diverse grouping of managerial skills and experiences, 
thereby allowing the students to learn from each other as well as 
from the faculty. 

The program consists of twenty courses scheduled into two 
ten-month academic calendar years. Each course is four sessions 
in length. All classes meet one afternoon /early evening per week 
in designated off-campus conference facilities for participant con- 
venience. Participants must agree in advance to attend all classes 
except for emergencies. They must be prepared to devote addi- 
tional time for class preparation and reading assignments. 

Upon completion of the program, participants will be 
awarded the degree of master of business administration (the 
executive program). 

Information concerning admission procedures and the 
academic calendar may be obtained by writing to the EMBA 
program director. 



53 



Program of study 
Required courses 

Course number and title Credit 

EXID 903 The Communication Process iy2 

EXID 906 The Management Process IVa 

EXID 909 Business and Government Relations iy2 

EXID 912 Financial Accounting IVz 

EXID 915 Quantitative Decision Making iy2 

EXID 918 Managerial Economics IVz 

EXID 921 Executive Development Seminar IVz 

EXID 924 Financial Management I IVi 

EXID 927 Financial Management II IVi 

EXID 930 Marketing Management IVz 

EXID 933 International Business Seminar IV2 

EXID 936 Logistics and Distribution IV2 

EXID 939 Operations Research and Management IV2 

EXID 942 Managerial Accounting IV2 

EXID 945 Human Resource Management 1 V'2 

EXID 948 Labor-Management Relations IV2 

EXID 951 Marketing Management Seminar iy2 

EXID 954 Organizational Development iy2 

EXID 957 Corporate Policy and Strategy iy2 

EXID 960 The Executive Seminar lyz 

30 



Forensic Science 



Director of Forensic Laboratory: Henry C. Lee, Professor of 
Criminal Justice, Ph.D., New York University; Chief 
Criminalist, Connecticut State Police (on leave). 

Director: R. E. Gaensslen, Associate Professor of Criminal 
Justice, Ph.D., Cornell University 

Forensic science is a broad interdisciplinary field in which 
the natural sciences are employed to analyze and evaluate 
physical evidence related to matters of law. The interdisciplinary 
forensic science program provides the advanced technical back- 
ground for professionals in the forensic science field as well as 
for those in allied fields, such as pathology, law, criminal justice 
administration, security, various areas of investigation in crime, 
fire and insurance, environmental studies and chemistry, for 
whom knowledge of the concepts and methods of forensic 
science is vital for the advancement of their professional 
performance. 



54 



The master of science in forensic science program stresses 
not only up-to-date analytical and scientific methods, but also 
the broad and understanding of forensic science concepts. The 
program centers on a core sequence of courses which all students 
are expected to complete. Students may then concentrate in 
either criminalistics or administration. 

Admission policy 

For admission to the master of science in forensic science 
program, a student must have an undergraduate degree in a 
natural or related science. Applicants with deficiencies in one or 
more areas may be provisionally accepted and will be required 
to complete the appropriate background courses during the early 
stage of the program before being fully matriculated. Applicants 
must take the aptitude test of the Graduate Record Examination 
or the Miller Analogies Test, and complete a questionnaire to be 
submitted directly to the Graduate School. 



Requirements for the degree 
Master of science in forensic science 

Candidates are required to complete 40 credit hours of 
graduate work, which may include an internship in a forensic 
science laboratory or equal work with other related agencies. 
The transfer of credit from other institutions will be permitted 
subject to the Graduate School policy on transfer credit detailed 
elsewhere in this bulletin. 

Thesis 

Students electing to write a thesis must register for thesis 
credit with the department. The thesis must show an ability to 
organize material in a clear and original manner, and present 
well-reasoned conclusions. Thesis preparation and submission 
must comply with Graduate School regulations detailed 
elsewhere in this bulletin. 

The forensic science laboratory of the university is available 
for research, and the laboratory maintains close contact with 
various laboratories in the area to afford students the oppor- 
tunity to observe, study and learn from many outstanding 
forensic scientists. 



55 



Program of study 
Required courses 

Course number and title Credit 

CJ 647 Advanced Criminalistics I 4 

CJ 648 Advanced Criminalistics II 4 

CJ 657 Physical Analysis in Forensic Science 4 

CJ 659 Biomedical Methods in Forensic Science 4 

Additional courses may be taken 
from the following areas: 

Basic science electives 

CH 611 Special Topics in Advanced Organic Chemistry . 3 

CH 621 Chemical Forensic Analysis with Laboratory ... 4 

CH 631 Advanced Analytical Chemistry 3 

CJ 660 Forensic Microscopy 4 

CJ 661 Mediolegal Investigation and Identification .... 3 

CJ 662 Forensic Toxicology 4 

CJ 663 Advanced Forensic Serology 4 

Criminal justice electives 

Law and Evidence 

Administration of Justice 

Forensic Science in the Administration of Justice 

Introduction to Systems Theory 

Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice 

Research Project I 

Research Project II 

Criminal Justice Internship I 

Criminal Justice Internship II 

Independent Study 

Other electives 

Up to nine credits of electives may be chosen from related 
areas within the graduate curriculum. 



CJ 


608 


CJ 


610 


CJ 


615 


CJ 


628 


CJ 


637 


CJ 


690 


CJ 


691 


CJ 


693 


CJ 


694 


CJ 


695 



56 



Gerontology 



Coordinator: Judith B. Gordon, Associate Professor of 
Sociology, Ph.D., University of Michigan 

The gerontology program is designed for both the practicing 
professional and those interested in the field of gerontology. 

Gerontology is an interdisciplinary field. The core cur- 
riculum exposes students to the fundamental insights and 
perspectives of sociology, social welfare, political science, 
psychology and administration, and aids students to compare 
and contrast these disciplines. The program is designed to expose 
students to crucial skills necessary to function effectively as 
gerontological professionals and to prepare them to pursue 
leadership roles in the field. 

The gerontology program is suitable for government 
employees, health care professionals and program administrators 
working in the field of aging, and for those considering such 
careers now or in the future. 

Admission requirements 

Prospective students must fulfill the admission requirements 
of the Graduate School. In addition, they may be required to 
fulfill additional requirements set by the Committee on Studies in 
Gerontology. 



Requirements for ttie degree 
Master of arts in gerontology 

Each degree candidate will complete an 18-hour core cur- 
riculum, and either the 21-hour concentration in psycho-social 
studies or the 21-hour concentration in administrative studies. A 
total of 39 credit hours is required for the degree. The transfer of 
credit from other institutions will be permitted subject to the 
Graduate School policy on transfer credit detailed elsewhere in 
this bulletin. All waivers must be approved in writing by the 
program coordinator. 



57 



Program of study 
Required core courses 

Course number and title Credit 

SO 651 Social Gerontology 3 

P 672 Psychology of the Middle and Later Years 3 

PA 644 Administration of Programs and Services 

for the Aged 3 

PS 633 The Political Process and the Aged 3 

SC 642 Physical Aging 3 

SO 652 Seminar in Gerontology 3 

18 

Students are expected to take SO 651, Social Gerontology, 
early in their studies, and SO 652 toward the end of the program. 

Concentration in psycho-social relations 

SO 641 Death and Suicide 3 

SW 651 Social Work with the Elderly I: 

Individuals, Families and Groups 3 

SW 652 Human Services with the Elderly II: 

Programs, Planning, Policies 3 

9 

Three courses such as: 

P 623 Psychology of the Group 3 

P 625 Advanced Psychology of Human Development . 3 

P 630 Psychology of Personality 3 

P 632 Group Dynamics and Group Treatment 3 

P 636 Abnormal Psychology 3 

9 
Electives 3 

21 

Students with no prior working experience in gerontology 
are strongly advised to undertake a field work practicum. 



58 



Concentration in administrative studies 

P 619 Organizational Behavior 3 

PA 604 Seminar in Communities and Social Change ... 3 

PA 641 Financial Management of Health 

Care Organizations 3 

PA 643 Health and Institutional Planning 3 

A Management Science elective, by advisement 3 

Electives, by advisement 6 

21 

Total 39 

Students with no prior supervised working experience in 
gerontology are strongly advised to undertake a field work 
practicum. 



Humanities 



Coordinator: David E. E. Sloane, Associate Professor, 
English, Ph.D., Duke University 

The program leading to a master of arts degree in human- 
ities will assist the student to develop an understanding of the 
range and capacity of social, practical, and artistic creativity; an 
appreciation of the cultural achievements of our past; and an in- 
creased sensitivity to the continuous intertwining of past achieve- 
ment, present activity and future aspirations - the constituents of 
any human culture. 

The curriculum is interdisciplinary, designed for the adult 
seeking intellectual challenge. Colloquia are conducted by two 
faculty members from different academic areas, and are con- 
cerned with an historical period or a seminal idea. Seminars are 
given by a single instructor and are more particular in focus. 
Independent study enables students to pursue their own interests. 
All courses are conducted as part of a continuing dialogue 
between students and faculty, stressing the relevance of our 
cultural tradition to the problems and issues of contemporary 
American life. 

Although the orientation of the program is toward Western 
thought, opportunity to pursue threads of investigation into 
other cultures is available and is encouraged. 



59 



Requirements for the degree 
Master of arts in Humanities 

Each student must accumulate 45 hours of credit including 
the writing of a thesis. Transfer credit will be given where 
appropriate. The program should include both colloquia and 
seminars. It must include HU 606, Humanism and Its 
Methodology. 



Industrial Engineering 



Coordinator: William S. Gere Jr., Professor of Industrial 
Engineering, Ph.D., Carnegie-Mellon University 

The master of science in industrial engineering is considered 
a fifth-year or professional degree, and is designed to provide a 
broad background in operations research, man-machine systems 
and human factor analysis. 

Admission policy 

Admission to the program is open to persons holding an 
undergraduate degree in engineering from a program accredited 
by the Engineers Council for Professional Development (ECPD). 
In some cases, an applicant with a degree in a related field may 
be considered for admission. Applicants with degrees in fields 
other than industrial engineering will be required to take a 
number of undergraduate courses or otherwise demonstrate pro- 
ficiency in several areas normally included in an industrial 
engineering program. 

Though admission decisions are based primarily on an appli- 
cant's undergraduate record, the promise of academic success is 
the essential factor for admission. 



Requirements for the degree 
IVIaster of science in 
industrial engineering 

The basic program consists of 48 credit hours. The transfer 
of credit from other institutions will be permitted subject to the 
Graduate School policy on transfer credit detailed elsewhere in 
this bulletin. Required courses may be waived on the basis of 



60 



undergraduate courses taken at accredited institutions. All 
waivers must be approved in writing by the Department of 
Industrial Engineering, and are conditional upon subsequent 
academic performance. In some cases, the program coordinator 
may permit substitution of relevant courses in place of the 
required courses. 

Seminar project 

The program requires all students to complete IE 690, 
Seminar Project. This requirement is met by the preparation of a 
relevant seminar project report, prepared under the direction of a 
faculty adviser. The complete and final manuscript must be sub- 
mitted to the project adviser prior to the end of the tenth week 
of the term in which the candidate expects to complete the 
requirements for the degree. For further specifications see 
Research Projects, Seminar Projects and Independent Study 
requirements detailed elsewhere in this bulletin. It is suggested 
that a student begin work on the seminar project after having 
completed at least 15 credit hours. 

In certain cases, students who routinely complete projects 
similar to the required Seminar Project as a part of their profes- 
sional duties may petition to satisfy the Seminar Project require- 
ment by taking two advanced industrial engineering electives in 
place of the project. Such a substitution must have the prior 
written approval of the program coordinator. 



Program of study 
Required courses 

Course number and title Credit 

IE 601 Introduction to Operations Research/ 

Management Science 3 

IE 607 Probability Theory 3 

IE 603F Introduction to Digital Computers (FORTRAN) . 3 
EC 604 Macroeconomic Analysis, or 

EC 603 Microeconomic Analysis 3 

IE 651 Human Engineering I 3 

IE 624 Quality Analysis 3 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 3 

P 619 Organizational Behavior, or 

P 620 Industrial Psychology 3 

IE 690 Seminar Project 3 

Electives (IE or Math Courses) 9 

Electives 12 

48 



61 



Industrial Relations 



Coordinator: Barbara Taylor, Assistant Professor of 

Management Science, M.S.B.A., University of Massachusetts 

Industrial relations, as a social and behavioral science 
discipline, is the field of study concerned with all aspects, both 
macro and micro, of the employment relationship. As an applied 
organizational and societal function, industrial relations is the 
profession concerned with the management of the aggregate 
manpower resources available for, or engaged in, the employ- 
ment relationship. 

As both an academic discipline and a profession, industrial 
relations is an interdisciplinary problem-solving field which 
attempts to resolve conflicts among four major parties to the 
employment relationship - employers, employees, unions and 
government. 

The field of industrial relations has been growing rapidly 
and is becoming increasingly important for the effective 
functioning of almost all kinds of organizations. More and more 
companies and institutions have created activities requiring the 
services of personnel conversant with the large body of tools and 
knowledge which has been generated in the field in the past two 
decades. 

The program will aim to present the knowledge and the skill 
needed to provide employment opportunities in various kinds of 
organizations in the fields of employee procurement, develop- 
ment, wage and salary administration, employee services and 
benefits, safety, labor-management relations, job and organiza- 
tion structuring, labor economics, supervision and manpower 
planning. The program will also establish the foundation for 
advanced study and research. 

The interdisciplinary orientation of the M.S. in industrial 
relations program is emphasized in the required courses which 
are drawn from economics, management and psychology. It will 
be further supported in the program's concentration electives 
which will be drawn from economics, industrial engineering, 
management, political science, psychology, public administration 
and quantitative analysis. 

Admission policy 

Admission is open to persons holding a baccalaureate degree 
from an accredited institution of higher education. The under- 
graduate degree should preferably, but not exclusively, be in the 
social and behavioral science (i.e., economics, history, political 
science, psychology, or sociology), business administration or 



62 



public administration. Admission is also open to full-time 
employed professionals in personnel and industrial relations 
holding a baccalaureate degree in any field from an accredited 
institution. 

Though admission decisions are based primarily on an appli- 
cant's undergraduate record, the promise of academic success is 
the essential factor for admission. Any applicant may be 
required to complete selected undergraduate courses with a grade 
of B or better as a condition of admission. Before matriculating a 
student may be required to submit scores from either the 
Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) or the Grad- 
uate Record Examination (GRE). To demonstrate that they have 
acceptable communication skills, persons may be required to 
submit a writing sample and to have a personal interview with 
the industrial relations program coordinator. Finally, applicants 
are expected to possess personal attributes which will support 
success in the personnel and industrial relations profession. 



Requirements for the degree 
Master of Science in 
industrial relations 

A minimum total of 39 graduate credit hours is required for 
the master of science degree in industrial relations. Of these 39 
graduate credit hours, 21 graduate credit hours are in approved 
industrial relations elective courses. 

A list of approved industrial relations elective courses is 
available from the industrial relations program coordinator. 
Students wishing to take courses not on the list must secure the 
approval of coordinator before registering for the course. 

Candidates for the M.S. in industrial relations must be 
familiar with the use of statistics in solving problems and deci- 
sion making. Knowledge of statistics is assumed in the advanced 
courses in the industrial relations program. For students without 
this background, this prerequisite may be met by taking a course 
in probability and statistics as a prerequisite. 



63 



Program of study 
Required courses 

Course number and title Credit 

MG 637 Management 3 

P 619 Organizational Behavior 3 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 3 

EC 627 Economics of Labor Relations 3 

EC 687 Collective Bargaining 3 

MG 678 Personnel Management Seminar 3 

MG 679 Industrial Relations Seminar 3 

IR core course credits 21 

IR approved electives 18 

Total credits for degree 39 



Legal Studies 



Coordinator: Caroline A. Dinegar, Professor of International 
Law and Relations, Ph.D., Columbia University 

In view of the increasing importance and complexity of law 
in society and its relevance to non-lawyers, the program is 
designed to provide expanded knowledge and understanding of 
the origins and applications of law in the modern world. 

The program will explore the theoretical foundations of law 
and the structural foundations of American and International 
Law, as well as more specific and technical application affecting 
modern institutions, corporations, and individuals. In addition, 
electives will permit concentrations in two major areas of law - 
Law and the Public Sector and Law and the Industrial Process. 

The interdisciplinary program will examine the creation and 
functioning of law at the global, national and state levels among 
administrative bodies, regulatory agencies, legislatures, and the 
courts. Among the issue-areas covered are legislative law- 
making, lobbying, contracts, torts, occupational health and 
safety, collective bargaining, taxation, equal employment oppor- 
tunity, and affirmative action. 

*The Board of Higher Education has granted planning approval for this 
program as of the date of publication of this bulletin. Licensure had not 
yet been received. It is hoped that licensure will be received in time for 
applications to be accepted for Fall 1981. Applications for the program 
cannot be accepted until licensure is received. 



64 



Logistics 



Coordinator: Robert Brooks, Assistant Professor, 
Marketing, M.B.A., New York University 

The master of science in logistics is designed to provide the 
degree candidate with a sound specialized knowledge of logistics. 
The program is based upon the definition of logistics as the 
science of designing and operating complex systems which 
acquire, distribute, maintain, recycle and dispose of all types of 
resources over the lifetime of a product, system or service. 
Logistics is thus a multidisciplinary field with relevance to high- 
technology defense industries, nondefense related private 
enterprise and the transportation industry. 

In order to provide flexibility and specialization in terms of 
various career fields within the scope of logistics, the program 
was designed with a series of common courses in statistics and 
operations research, systems theory and simulation, and logistics 
management and support analysis. These courses provide the 
background for a concentration which provides specialized train- 
ing in a particular career field: logistics management, logistics 
engineering and business logistics. 



Admission policy 

Admission to the master of science in logistics program is 
open to persons who hold a undergraduate degree from an 
accredited institution. An undergraduate grade point average of 
at least 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) is required for full matriculation. 
Students with a grade point average between 2.5 and 3.0 may be 
considered for provisional acceptance. All applicants must take 
the Graduate Record Examination as part of the admission 
procedure. Admission is based on an applicant's undergraduate 
record and GRE score. However, the promise of academic 
success is the essential factor for admission. Students will be 
admitted to the program during the fall and winter trimesters. 



Requirements for the degree 
Master of science in logistics 

A total of 48 credits is required of candidates for the M.S. 
in Logistics degree. Candidates for the M.S. in Logistics program 
are expected to have a sound background in calculus and matrix 



65 



algebra, FORTRAN, microeconomics and management. Students 
who show deficiences in these areas will be required to take 
additional coursework in these areas before admission as a 
degree candidate. Required courses in the core may be waived on 
the basis of undergraduate courses taken at accredited 
institutions. All waivers must be approved in writing by the 
program coordinator and are conditional upon subsequent 
academic performance. 

Seminar project 

The program requires all students to complete LG 690, 
Seminar Project. This requirement is met by the preparation of a 
relevant seminar project report under the direction of a faculty 
adviser. The complete and final manuscript must be submitted to 
the project adviser prior to the end of the tenth week of the term 
in which the candidate expects to complete the requirements for 
the degree. For further specifications see Research Project, 
Seminar Projects and Independent Study requirements detailed 
elsewhere in this bulletin. It is suggested that a student begin 
work on the seminar project after having completed at least 15 
credit hours. 

In certain cases, students who routinely complete projects 
similar to the required Seminar Project as part of their profes- 
sional duties may petition to satisfy the Seminar Project require- 
ment by taking advanced electives in place of the project. Such a 
substitution must have the prior written approval of the program 
coordinator. 



Program of study 
Required courses 

Course number and title Credit 

QA 605 Advanced Statistics 3 

IE 601 Introduction to Operations Research/ 

Management Science 3 

QA 606 Advanced Management Science 3 

QA 607 Forecasting 3 

IE 604 Management Systems 3 

IE 681 Systems Simulation 3 

IE 686 Inventory Analysis 3 

LG 660 Logistics Technology and Management 3 

LG 665 Integrated Logistics Support Analysis 3 

27 



66 



Concentration in logistics management 

LG 669 Life Cycle Cost Analysis 3 

MG 638 Cost-Benefit Management 3 

MG 635 Purchasing and Material Management 3 

MG 641 Contract Administration 3 

LG 690 Seminar Project 3 

Restricted Electives 6 



Concentration in logistics engineering 

LG 669 Life Cycle Cost Analysis 3 

IE 643 Reliability and Maintainability 3 

IE 624 Quality Analysis 3 

IE 655 Value Engineering 3 

LG 690 Seminar Project 3 

Restricted Electives 6 



Concentration in business logistics 

MG 625 Systems Techniques in Business Administration . 3 

MG 635 Purchasing and Material Management 3 

MK 645 Distribution Strategy 3 

IE 615 Transportation and Distribution 3 

LG 690 Seminar Project 3 

Restricted Electives 6 



21 



21 



21 



Mechanical Engineering 

Coordinator: Richard J. Greet, Professor of Mechanical 
Engineering, Ph.D., Harvard University 

This program is intended to meet the needs of professionally 
employed engineers and scientists for academic work beyond the 
baccalaureate level. It has been designed to increase competence 
in modern analysis and synthesis techniques as they apply to 
engineering design. 

The program centers on a core sequence which all students 
are expected to take. The core courses contain advanced methods 
of analysis and design which are of common interest in engineer- 
ing work. Students complete the program by electing a series of 



67 



courses in mechanical engineering which is particularly suited to 
their current professional interests. Early in the program, 
students, with the approval of their advisers, prepare a detailed 
plan insuring an overall educational experience that is integrated 
and logical. 

All decisions regarding both core and elective requirements 
are subject to final approval of the student's adviser. 



Requirements for the degree 
Master of science in 
mechanical engineering 

A minimum of 39 credits must be completed to earn the 
master of science degree in niechanical engineering. The transfer 
credit from other institutions will be permitted subject to the 
Graduate School policy on transfer credit. Thesis topics should 
be approved by the faculty adviser when the student has com- 
pleted 18-21 graduate credits. Thesis preparation and submission 
must comply with Graduate School policy on Thesis with the 
final manuscript submitted to the adviser prior to the end of the 
tenth week of the term in which the candidate expects to com- 
plete the requirements for the degree. 



Program of study 
Required courses 

Course number and title Credit 

M 624 Applied Mathematics 3 

ME 602 Boundary Value Problems 3 

ME 603 Approximation Methods 3 

ME 604 Numerical Methods, or 

M 620 Numerical Analysis 3 

ME 615 Theory of Elasticity 3 

ME 625 Mechanics of Continua 3 

ME 630 Advanced Fluid Mechanics 3 

ME 698-699 Thesis 6 

Electives 12 

39 



68 



Elective courses 

Course number and title Credit 

ME 610 Advanced Dynamics 3 

ME 611 System Vibrations 3 

ME 620 Classical Thermodynamics 3 

ME 622 Statistical Mechanics 3 

ME 628 Modern Materials 3 

ME 632 Advanced Heat Transfer 3 

ME 645 Computational Fluid Dynamics 

and Heat Transfer 3 

ME 670 Special Topics - Mechanical Engineering 3 

ME 695 Independent Study I 3 

ME 696 Independent Study II 3 



Occupational Safety and 
Health! Management* 



Coordinator: Abdul Qazi, Associate Professor of Environmental 
Studies, Ph.D., Environmental Health and Industrial Hygiene, 
University of Oklahoma 

The master in science in occupational safety and health 
(OSH) management is designed to provide the core technical 
knowledge in the OSH field and the managerial skills to admin- 
istrate a safety and health program, particularly at the corporate 
level. 

The program is designed to accommodate both the active 
practitioner in the OSH field as well as the novice who aspires to 
a career in this dynamic occupation. This flexibility is provided 
through a program sequence of 33 s.h. of core courses and 12 
s.h. of elective concentrations offered in either a science/engi- 
neering track or a management track. 

*The Board of Higher Education has granted planning approval 
for this program as of the date of publication of this bulletin. 
Licensure has not yet been received. It is hoped that licensure 
will be received in time for applications to be accepted for Fall 
1981. Applications for the program cannot be accepted until 
licensure is received, and the requirements listed above may 
change. 



69 



Admissions policy 

Admission to the master of science in occupational safety 
and health management program is open to persons who hold a 
baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution. An under- 
graduate grade point average of at least 2.5 on a 4.0 scale is 
required for provisional acceptance, 3.0 for full matriculation. 
Undergraduate courses in General Chemistry, General Physics, 
Biology, Statistics, Psychology, and Accounting are required. 
The degree candidate may be required to submit scores from the 
Graduate Record Examination. Students who do not meet all 
requirements will be evaluated on an individual basis. 



Requirements for the degree 
Master of science in occupational 
safety and health management 

Candidates are required to complete 45 credit hours of 
graduate work. Transfer of credit from other institutions will be 
permitted subject to the Graduate School policy on transfer 
credit noted elsewhere in this bulletin. Consideration for waiver 
of core courses on the basis of undergraduate experience is at the 
discretion of the program coordinator. 

Program of study (Tentative: see footnote page 69) 

Required core courses 

Course number and title Credit 

SH 602 Safety Organization and Administration 3 

SH 605 Industrial Safety Engineering 3 

SH 608 Industrial Hygiene Practices 3 

SH 620 Occupational Safety and Health Law 3 

SH 630 Product Safety and Liability 3 

MG 637 Management 3 

A 621 Managerial Accounting 3 

QA 604 Probability and Statistics 3 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 3 

P 619 Organizational Behavior 3 

IE 651 Human Engineering I 3 

33 



70 



Elective concentrations 

The student has the option of choosing 4 courses from one 
of two tracks. It is recommended that he choose the track from 
that area with which he is least familiar. 

A. Track I: Science /Engineering 

SC 601 Ecology for Environmental Engineers 3 

SC 603 Air Pollution 3 

SC 610 Environmental Health 3 

CH 601 Environmental Chemistry 3 

SH 650 Seminar Contemporary Issues 3 

SH 651 Fire Prevention Law 3 

SH 652 High Rise Fire Problems 3 

PH 630 Health Physics 3 

B. Track II: Management 

IE 612 Managerial Interactions I 3 

P 640 Industrial Motivation and Morale 3 

MG 664 Organizational Effectiveness 3 

MG 645 Management of Human Resources 3 

MG 678 Personnel Management Seminar 3 

SH 650 Seminar Contemporary Issues 3 



12 
45 



Operations Research 



Coordinator: William S. Gere Jr., Professor of Industrial 
Engineering, Ph.D., Carnegie-Mellon University 

The master of science in operations research curriculum 
provides thorough coverage of the theory, methodology and 
application of the techniques of operations research and systems 
analysis. The program is designed to prepare qualified applicants 
from diverse backgrounds to deal with major social, industrial 
and business problems. 



71 



Requirements for the degree 
Master of science in 
operations researcli 

The basic program consists of 48 credit hours. The transfer 
of credit from other institutions will be permitted subject to the 
Graduate School policy on transfer credit detailed elsewhere in 
this bulletin. Required courses may be waived on the basis of 
undergraduate courses taken at accredited institutions. All 
waivers must be approved in writing by the Department of 
Industrial Engineering, and are contingent upon subsequent 
academic performance. In some cases, the coordinator may 
permit substitution of relevant courses in place of the required 
courses. 

Seminar project 

The Master of Science in operations research program 
requires all students to complete IE 690, Seminar Project. This 
requirement is met by the preparation of a relevant seminar 
project report, prepared under the direction of a faculty adviser. 
The complete and final manuscript must be submitted to the 
project adviser prior to the end of the tenth week of the term in 
which the candidate expects to complete the requirements for his 
degree. For further specification see Research Projects, Seminar 
Projects and Independent Study requirements detailed elsewhere 
in this bulletin. It is suggested that a student begin work on the 
seminar project after having completed at least 15 credit hours. 

In certain cases, students who routinely complete projects 
similar to the required Seminar Project as a part of their profes- 
sional duties may petition to satisfy the Seminar Project require- 
ment by taking two advanced industrial engineering electives in 
place of the project. Such a substitution must have the prior 
written approval of the program coordinator. 



71 



Program of study 
Requires courses 

Course number and title Credit 

IE 601 Introduction to Operations Research/ 

Management Science 3 

IE 603F Introduction to Digital Computers (FORTRAN) 3 

IE 607 Probability Theory 3 

M 610 Fundamentals of Calculus and Linear Algebra . . 3 
EC 604 Macroeconomic Analysis, or 

EC 603 Microeconomic Analysis 3 

IE 621 Linear Programming 3 

IE 622 Queuing Theory 3 

IE 685 Theory of Optimization 3 

IE 686 Inventory Analysis 3 

IE 688 Design of Experiments 3 

IE 690 Seminar Project 3 

Electives (I.E., Math, or E.E.) 6 

Electives 9 

48 



Organizational/Industrial 
Psychology 



Acting Coordinator: Benjamin Weybrew, Assistant Professor 
of Psychology, Ph.D., University of Colorado. 

The master of arts in organizational /industrial psychology is 
designed as an interdisciplinary program leading to the develop- 
ment of expertise in the application of psychology for men and 
women involved in supervisory roles and for those planning such 
professional careers. The program emphasizes both the principles 
and procedures of psychology and the perspectives of other 
disciplines in preparing the student to meet organizational prob- 
lems in their full complexity. Approximately two dozen top 
industrialists have agreed to assist the department in the 
continuing development of the program. 



73 



The program further strives to: 

1. famiHarize the student with contemporary research and 
pubHcations concerned with mutual relationships between 
organizational characteristics and the employee's behavior; 

2. provide the student with an improved understanding of psy- 
chological findings relating to personnel counseling, test 
administration and interpretation for selection, transfer, and 
promotion as well as management development; 

3. enhance the student's knowledge of current psychological 
information and skills relating to human-need satisfaction, 
executive training, organizational climate, problem solving 
and decision making, effective organizational change, and 
the study of organizationally induced stress; 

4. familiarize the student with current psychological theory and 
findings relating to attitude measurement, personnel policy 
evaluation and development and management development 
programs; 

5. meet the increasing needs of organizations for individuals 
with specialized research and human relations skills; and 

6. provide graduate study on a late afternoon and early evening 
basis for the full-time employee. 

Admission policy 

Applicants are expected to possess social and interpersonal 
characteristics which will support success in organizational 
settings. 

Students who give evidence of a mature interest in the appli- 
cation of psychological principles to organizational problems and 
who hold an undergraduate degree from an accredited college or 
university are eligible for admission. 

Applicants are required to complete a questionnaire and 
submit it directly to the Graduate School and may be required to 
submit scores from either the Miller Analogies Test or the 
Graduate Record Examination Aptitude Test. An undergraduate 
major in psychology is not specifically required as a basis for 
consideration. However, all students are expected to have at 
least an introductory level understanding of psychological con- 
cepts, principles, and methods before taking courses in the 
master of arts in organizational /industrial psychology program. 



74 



Requirements for the degree 
Master of arts in 
organizational/industrial psychiology 

A total of 39 credit hours is required of candidates for the 
degree of master of arts in organizational /industrial psychology. 
Candidates for this degree will be required to complete 18 credit 
hours of required courses in the core curriculum. Another 21 
credit hours of electives will be chosen after consultation with 
the department chairman, or a representative, in light of the 
student's academic and professional goals. Students may not 
complete more than 9 credit hours of electives until they have 
satisfied the core requirements. Up to 9 credit hours of electives 
may be taken in other departments, such as industrial engineer- 
ing, economics, management, marketing, public administration 
or criminal justice. 

Transfer credit 

The transfer of credit from other institutions will be 
permitted subject to the Graduate School policy on transfer of 
credit detailed elsewhere in this bulletin. 

Thesis 

Students electing to write a thesis must register for P 698, 
Thesis I, and P 699, Thesis II. The thesis must show ability to 
organize materials in a clear and original manner and present 
well-reasoned conclusions. 

The thesis is written under the direction of the faculty 
member in charge of the thesis seminar or a faculty member with 
special competence in the subject matter of the thesis. The 
complete and final manuscript must be submitted to the thesis 
adviser prior to the end of the tenth week of the term in which 
the candidate expects to complete the requirements for the 
degree. Thesis preparation and submission must comply with the 
Graduate School policy on Thesis/Seminar Project Requirements 
detailed elsewhere in this bulletin. 

Program options 

In response to the different needs and levels of preparation 
of students in the program, the four following options are 
available: 

Option 1 is recommended for an individual currently employed 
in a managerial or supervisory position. The practicum seminars 
will allow the student to investigate a specific job-related 
problem under expert faculty supervision. 



75 



Option 2 affords the student with limited work experience an 
opportunity to serve an industrial internship, providing the 
student the chance to observe real organizational /industrial 
situations to be analyzed and discussed with a faculty supervisor. 

Option 3 will provide the student planning to pursue doctoral 
studies with an essential tool - the ability to do empirical 
research and report writing through the preparation of a thesis. 

Option 4 consists of elective courses selected under faculty 
advisement. The choice of electives is intended to provide the 
student with a broad interdisciplinary background, 
complementing the student's own academic training and interest. 

Normally the student should not begin work on any of the 
first three options until he/she has completed at least four core 
courses. 



Program of study 
Required courses 

Course number and title Credit 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 3 

P 609 Research Methods 3 

P 619 Organizational Behavior 3 

P 635 Assessment of Human Performance with 

Standardized Tests 3 

P 640 Industrial Motivation and Morale 3 

P 645 Seminar in Organizational /Industrial 

Psychology 3 

Elective options (see below)* 21 

39 

Elective options 

Option 1 

P 678 Practicum I 3 

P 679 Practicum II 3 

Electives * 15 

21 

Option 2 

P 693 Organizational Internship I 3 

P 694 Organizational Internship II 3 

Electives* 15 

21 



76 



Option 3 

P 698 Thesis I 3 

P 699 Thesis II 3 

Electives* 15 



Option 4 



21 



Electives * 21 



'The choice of electives is made in consultation with a departmen- 
tal adviser in light of the student's academic and professional 
goals. 



Public Administration 



Coordinator: Kenneth Fox, Assistant Professor of Public 
Administration, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

The general purpose of the master of public administration 
degree at the University of New Haven is the training of men 
and women at the graduate level for public service careers. 
Specifically, the program strives to: 

1. equip students with modern analytical and quantitative tools 
of decision making and their application to complex prob- 
lems of government; 

2. expose students to the wide range of administrative and 
managerial problems and responsibilities of government; and 

3. increase the student's knowledge and skills in the particular 
management functions of budgeting, planning, public policy 
formulation, public finance and public personnel 
administration. 



Requirements for the degree 
Master of public administration 

Forty -five graduate credit hours are required of candidates 
for this degree. Of the 15 credit hours of electives in the M.P.A. 
program, six credit hours may be taken in graduate courses 
offered in other programs such as psychology, criminal justice, 
economics, and industrial engineering. 



n 



Program of study 
Required courses 

Course number and title Credit 

PA 601 Principles of Public Administration 3 

PA 602 Public Policy Formulation and Implementation . 3 
PA 604 Seminar in Communities and Social Change ... 3 

EC 608 Economics for Public Administrators 3 

PA 611 Research Methods in Public Administration .... 3 
PA 620 Personnel Administration and Collective 

Bargaining in the Public Sector 3 

PA 625 Administrative Behavior 3 

PA 632 Public Finance and Budgeting 3 

PA 690 Research Project 3 

PA 693 Public Administration Internship 3 

Electives 15 



45 



Concentrations 



Concentrations in the master of public administration 
program are designed to provide career-oriented structure for 
students with well-formed career interests. The concentration in 
health care management is the first concentration introduced into 
the program. The department expects to develop additional 
concentrations over the next several years. 

Health care management 

Adviser: Kenneth Fox, Assistant Professor of Public 
Administration, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Students following the health care concentration will take 
the core curriculum of ten courses and follow the health care 
concentration of five courses for their five elective courses. 

PS 635 Law and Public Health 

MG 640 Management of Health Care Organizations 

PA 641 Financial Management of Health 

Care Organizations 
PA 643 Health and Institutional Planning 

and one course chosen from among the following: 

PA 642 Health Care Delivery Systems 

PA 644 Administration of Programs and Services 

for the Aged 
PA 645 Health Care Economics and Finance 



78 



Senior Professional Certificates 



This program is limited to those already holding an 
advanced degree who want additional graduate study in a 
coherent program, but do not want to work toward another 
advanced degree. 

Since the senior professional certificate is not a degree, a 
student may transfer credits earned for a certificate into a 
master's program at any time, subject to the requirements of the 
master's degree and the decision of the coordinator of the 
master's program, and to acceptance in the master's program. 

Students completing work in a certificate program do not 
attend commencement but will receive a certificate. A petition 
for certification must be filed with the graduate registrar and the 
appropriate fee paid. When the course work is reviewed and 
found complete the certificate will be mailed to the student. 



Requirements for the certificate 

The program consists of 15 or 18 credits, depending upon 
the area chosen. Students, having chosen their area of study, 
should contact the adviser who is listed for that particular area. 



Programs of study 



Twelve different certificates are offered. Three certificate 
programs allow options to choose a particular speciality. The 
programs are the following: 
Accounting and Taxation 

I: Financial Accounting 

II: Managerial Accounting 

III: Accounting Information Systems 

IV: Taxation of Individuals 

V: Taxation of Corporations 

VI: Finance 
Applications of Psychology 

Computer Applications and Information Systems 
Economic Forecasting 
Finance 

General Management 
Human Resources Management 
International Business 



79 



Marketing 

I: Marketing 

II: Quantitative Techniques in Marketing 
Media for Business 
Public Management 

I: Survey of the Field 

II: Urban and Regional Planning and Management 

III: Public Personnel Management 
Quantitative Analysis 



Accounting and Taxation 

Adviser: Anne J. Rich, Associate Professor of Accounting, 
C.P.A., CM. A., Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 

Option I: Financial Accounting* 

Any five from the folloiving: 

A 650 Advanced Accounting Theory 3 

A 651 Financial Account Seminar 3 

A 652 Advanced Auditing 3 

A 653 Accounting for Not-for-Profit Organization ... 3 

A 654 Financial Statements: Reporting and Analysis . . 3 

A 656 International Accounting 3 



Option II: Managerial Accounting* 

Any five from the following: 

A 621 Managerial Accounting 3 

A 641 Accounting Information Systems 3 

A 642 Operational Auditing 3 

A 661 Managerial Accounting Seminar 3 

FI 615 Finance 3 

FI 645 Corporate Financial Theory 3 

FI 651 Portfolio Management and Capital 

Market Analysis 3 



15 



15 



Option III: Accounting Information Systems* 

A 641 Accounting Information Systems 3 

A 642 Operational Auditing 3 

A 652 Advanced Auditing 3 

and any two accounting systems or 9 

computer science courses 



80 



option IV: Taxation of Individuals* 

A 601 Federal Income Taxation I 3 

A 602 Federal Income Taxation II 3 

A 603 Federal Income Taxation III 3 

A 608 Estate and Gift Taxation 3 

and one taxation elective 12 

Option V: Taxation of Corporations* 

A 604 Corporate Income Taxation I 3 

A 605 Corporate Income Taxation II 3 

A 606 Corporate Income Taxation III 3 

A 610 Consolidated Returns 3 

and one taxation elective 12 

*Other courses may be substituted by consent of the coordinator of the 
program. 

Option VI: (see 'Tinance" below) 

Applications of Psychology 

Adviser: Thomas Mentzer, Acting Chairman, Associate 
Professor of Psychology, Ph.D., Brown University 

Students are expected to plan a sequence of courses with the 
faculty adviser at the start of the program. Five courses will be 
selected depending upon a student's interests, career objectives 
and academic preparation; courses are usually limited to the 
following: 

P 610 Program Evaluation in Community Psychology 3 

P 621 Behavior Modification 3 

P 623 Psychology of the Small Group 3 

P 627 Attitude and Opinion Measurement 3 

P 628 The Interview 3 

P 629 Introduction to Counseling 3 

P 630 Psychology of Personality 3 

P 631 Social Psychology 3 

P 632 Group Dynamics and Group Treatment 3 

P 633 Problems of Drug Abuse 3 

P 636 Abnormal Psychology 3 

P 638 Psychology of Communication and 

Opinion Change 3 

P 641 Personnel Development and Training 3 

P 642 Organizational Change and Development 3 

P 650 Ecological Psychology 3 

Total of 25 



81 



Computer Applications and Information Systems 

Adviser: William S. Gere Jr., Professor of Industrial 
Engineering, Ph.D., Carnegie-Mellon University 

IE 604 Management Systems 3 

IE 605 Advanced Business Programming 3 

IE 610 Computer Systems Selection 3 

IE 614 Data Information Systems 3 

IE 684 Multiprogramming Systems 3 

15 

Economic Forecasting 

Adviser: John Teluk, Professor of Economics, M.A., 
Free University, Munich 

EC 604 Macroeconomic Analysis 3 

EC 635 Comparative Economic Systems 3 

EC 645 Seminar in Macroeconomic Policy 3 

EC 653 Econometrics 3 

QA 607 Forecasting 3 

15 
Finance 
Adviser: Anne J. Rich 

Option VI: Finance* 

any five from the following: 

FI 615 Finance 3 

FI 617 Financial Institutions and Capital Markets 3 

FI 619 Monetary and Central Banking Policy 3 

FI 620 Working Capital Management and Planning ... 3 

FI 645 Corporate Financial Theory 3 

FI 649 Security Analysis 3 

FI 651 Portfolio Theory and Capital Market 3 

15 

*Other courses may be substituted by consent of the coordinator of the 
program. 



82 



General Management 

Adviser: Gene F. Brady, Associate Professor of 
Management Science, Ph.D., University of Oregon 

any six from the following: 

MG 660 Comparative Management 3 

MG 661 Development of Management Thought 3 

MG 662 Organization Theory 3 

MG 663 Leadership in Organizations 3 

MG 664 Organizational Effectiveness 3 

MG 669 Business Policy and Strategy 3 

MG 680 Current Topics in Business Administration 3 

MG 675 Readings in Management 3 



Human Resources Management 

Adviser: Gene F. Brady 

The following four courses: 

MG 645 Management of Human Resources 

MG 665 Compensation Administration 

MG 678 Personnel Management Seminar 

MG 679 Industrial Relations Seminar 

Plus any two from the following: 

MG 690/PA 690-1 Research in Human Resources 

Management 
MG 695-6/PA 695-6 Independent Study: Human Resources 

Management 
P 627 Attitude and Opinion Measurement 
P 628 The Interview 

P 641 Personnel Development and Training 
PA 620 Personnel Administration and Collective 

Bargaining in the Public Sector 
EC 625 Industrial Relations 
EC 627 Economics of Labor Relations 
EC 687 Collective Bargaining 

Media for Business 

Adviser: M. L. McLaughlin, Professor of Communication, 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

CO 601 Basics of Business Media Production 3 

CO 605 Planning Audio Visual Systems for Business ... 3 

CO 609 Scripting the Media Presentation 3 

CO 613 Media Presentations for Business 3 

CO 621 The Communication Process 3 



83 



18 



15 



International Business 

Adviser: Arvin F. Rodrigues, Assistant Professor 
of Marketing, Ph.D., Columbia University 

IB 643 International Business Operations 3 

and any four from the following 

EC 620 Economic History of Western Europe 3 

EC 660 Economic Development of Japan 3 

IB 644 Import and Export Business 3 

IB 645 Structure of World Markets 3 

IB 651 Comparative Marketing 3 

IB 652 Multinational Business Operations 3 

MG 660 Comparative Management 3 

PS 603 International Law 3 



Marketing 

Adviser: Arvin F. Rodrigues 

Option I: Marketing 

MK 609 Marketing 3 

and any four from the following: 

IB 643 International Business Operations 3 

IB 644 Import and Export Business 3 

IB 651 Comparative Marketing 3 

MK 616 Buyer Behavior 3 

MK 639 Marketing Research and Information Systems . . 3 

MK 641 Marketing Management 3 

MK 643 Product Management 3 

MK 644 Consumerism 3 

MK 645 Distribution Strategy 3 

MK 680 Marketing Workshop 3 

Option II: Quantitative Techniques in Marketing 

IE 603F Introduction to Digital Computers: FORTRAN . 3 
QA 604 Probability & Statistics 3 

and any three from the following: 

IE 615 Transportation and Distribution 3 

MK 639 Marketing Research and Information Systems . . 3 

MK 641 Marketing Management 3 

QA 607 Forecasting 3 



15 



15 



15 



84 



Public Management 

Adviser: Kenneth Fox; Assistant Professor of Public 
Administration; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Option I: Survey of the Field 

any five from the following: 

EC 665 Urban and Regional Economic Development ... 3 

PS 608 The Legislative Process 3 

PA 611 Research Methods in Public Administration .... 3 

PA 620 Personnel Administration and Collective 

Bargaining in the Public Sector 3 

PA 625 Administrative Behavior 3 

PA 630 Governmental Accounting 3 

PA 632 Public Finance and Budgeting 3 

PA 660 Urban Planning: Theory and Practice 3 

PA 662 Environmental Design 3 

15 

Option II: Urban and Regional Planning and Management 

And five from the following: 

Urban and Regional Economic Development ... 3 

Governmental Accounting 3 

Problems of Municipal Management 3 

Urban Planning: Theory and Practice 3 

Problems of Metropolitan Areas 3 

Environmental Design 3 

Urban Government and Politics 3 

15 

Public Personnel Management 

Industrial Relations 3 

Labor Legislation 3 

Personnel Administration and Collective 

Bargaining in the Public Sector 3 

PA 625 Administrative Behavior 3 

and one from the following: 

P 627 Attitude and Opinion Measurement 3 

P 635 Assessment of Human Performance with 

Standardized Tests 3 

15 



EC 


665 


PA 


630 


PA 


634 


PA 


660 


PA 


661 


PA 


662 


PS 


616 


Opt 


ion III 


EC 


625 


EC 


691 


PA 


620 



85 



Quantitative Analysis 

Adviser: John Moore, Assistant Professor of Management 
Science, Ph.D., Southern IlHnois University 

IE 604 Management Systems 3 

QA 604 Probability and Statistics 3 

QA 605 Advanced Statistics 3 

QA 606 Advanced Management Science 3 

QA 607 Forecasting 3 



15 



Taxation 



Coordinator: Martin H. Zern, Associate Professor of 
Accounting, C.P.A., J.D., LL.M., New York University 

Society's decision to pursue collectively, through the instru- 
ment of governmental policy, a variety of economic and social 
goals has led to the development of a complex body of "tax 
law." Given the dynamic state of society's economic and social 
goals, and the alternative means for their accomplishment, the 
body of "tax law" characteristically exists in a continual state of 
change. 

The complex and dynamic structure of "tax law" is 
significant not only because of its impact upon the process of 
accomplishing society's goals but also because of its influence 
upon the economic decision-making process in which society's 
members are constantly engaged. The tax consequences at the 
applicable governmental level - federal, state, and local - of 
economic decisions made by society's members have been and 
will continue to be an increasingly important consideration. 

Program objectives 

In recognition of the above, a need to prepare technically 
competent individuals for careers in the field of taxation has 
developed. Owing to the complex and dynamic nature of "tax 
law," it appears appropriate to conduct this preparation at an 
advanced level of inquiry with an emphasis upon examining the 



86 



issues of current interest in taxation. Accordingly, the master of 
science program in taxation has been designed as a framework to 
accomplish the following structure of objectives: 

1. To apprise the students of the role of "tax law" relative to 
social and economic policy. 

2. To prepare students with approaches relative to the integra- 
tion of "tax law" with the economic decision-making 
process. 

3. To prepare the students for technical competence relative to 
understanding and interpreting "tax law." 

4. To prepare students with approaches to independent research 
in taxation. 

5. To familiarize students with Internal Revenue procedures. 
Given the above objectives, the master of science program 

in taxation provides a framework through which advanced and 
timely tax training can be acquired by experienced professionals 
(accountants and attorneys) practicing in the field of taxation, as 
well as individuals seeking to prepare themselves for entry into 
career positions in taxation. 

Admission policy 

Admission to matriculation in the program is available to 
CPA's, attorneys, and persons holding an undergraduate degree 
from an accredited institution, preferably, but not exclusively, in 
accounting or in business administration with a major in 
accounting. Persons holding other than the above degrees will be 
required to take a number of selected undergraduate courses as a 
condition for admission. Admission is based primarily on an 
applicant's undergraduate record; however, the promise of 
academic success is the essential factor for admission. In support 
of their application, persons may submit their scores from the 
Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT). An applicant 
may be required to take this test. 



Requirements for the degree 
Master of science In taxation 

A minimum total of 36 credits is required for the master of 
science in taxation. The 36 credits will include 24 credits from 
required core courses and 12 credits from electives. The transfer 
of credit from other institutions will be permitted subject to the 
Graduate School policy on transfer credit detailed elsewhere in 
this bulletin. 



87 



Program of study 
Required courses 

Course number and title Credit 

A 601 Federal Income Taxation I 3 

A 602 Federal Income Taxation II 3 

A 604 Corporate Income Taxation I 3 

A 605 Corporate Income Taxation II 3 

A 607 Tax Accounting 3 

A 608 Estate and Gift Taxation 3 

A 614 Federal Tax Practice and Procedure 3 

A 615 Research Project in Federal Income Taxation ... 3 

24 

Elective courses 

A 603 Federal Income Taxation III 3 

A 606 Corporate Income Taxation III 3 

A 609 State and Local Taxation 3 

A 610 Consolidated Returns 3 

A 611 Income Taxation of Estates and Trusts 3 

A 612 International Taxation 3 

A 613 Taxation of Partnerships and Partners 3 

Four electives totaling 12 

Total for degree 36 



88 



89 




A computer center employee 
demonstrates the latest com- 
puter technology, including a 
screen with three-dimensional 
rotational graphics capa- 
bilities. 



90 



Course Descriptions 

Accounting (A) 92 
Civil and Environmental 

Engineering (CE) 95 

Chemistry (CH) 97 

Criminal Justice (CJ) 98 

Communication (CO) 102 

English (E) 104 

Economics (EC) 104 

Electrical Engineering (EE) 107 

Executive M.B.A. (EXID) 109 

Finance (FI) 111 

Hospitality Administration (HM) 113 

Humanities (HU) 114 

International Business (IB) 116 

Industrial Engineering (IE) 117 

Business Law (LA) 122 

Logistics Management (LG) 123 

Mathematics (M) 124 

Mechanical Engineering (ME) 125 

Management Science (MG) 127 

Marketing (MK) 131 

Psychology (P) 132 

Public Administration (PA) 137 

Physics (PH) 141 

Philosophy (PL) 141 

Political Science (PS) 141 

Quantitative Analysis (QA) 143 

Science (SC) 144 
Occupational Safety and 

Health Management (SH) 146 

Sociology (SO) 146 

Social Welfare (SW) 149 



91 



Course Descriptions 

Unless otherwise indicated, all graduate courses carry three credit hours. 

Department of Accounting 

A 600 Accounting No Credit 

The principles and procedures underlying the generation of finan- 
cial accounting information. 

A 601 Federal Income Taxation I 

A study of tax policy and the basic principles of the federal in- 
come tax law taught at an advanced level of inquiry. Coverage entails 
the key concepts of gross income, adjusted gross income, deductions, 
exemptions credits, and special tax computations, with special attention 
given to the provisions of the Internal Revenue Code affecting individual 
taxpayers. 

A 602 Federal Income Taxation II 

Prerequisite: A 601. A continuation of Federal Income Taxation I 
emphasizing the basic provisions concerning dispositions of property: 
analysis of basis, recognition of gain or loss, capital asset transactions 
and nonrecognition exchanges. Coverage extended to assignment of 
income theories, tax minimization and deferred payment sales. 

A 603 Federal Income Taxation III 

Prerequisite: A 602, or permission of the instructor. The taxation 
of deferred compensation, with particular emphasis on employee benefit 
plans. Primary focus is on qualified retirement plans and the impact of 
the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974. Nonqualified 
plans, executive compensation, individual retirement accounts, Keogh 
plans and insurance plans are also included. 

A 604 Corporate Income Taxation I 

Prerequisite: A 602. A foundation course analyzing the basic 
federal income tax provisions affecting corporations and shareholders. 
Course coverage includes organization of the corporation, corporate 
capital structure, corporate distributions, stock redemptions, bail-out 
techniques and liquidations. 

A 605 Corporate Income Taxation II 

Prerequisite: A 604. A detailed analysis of the federal income tax 
rules covering corporate reorganizations and divisions. Also discussed 
are some of the nontax aspects of corporate reorganizations such as 
S.E.C., anti-trust, and business reasons for choice of particular method. 

A 606 Corporate Income Taxation III 

Prerequisite: A 605. Advanced study in the corporate tax area 
including subchapter S corporations, collapsible corporations, 
accumulated earnings tax, affiliated corporations and carryover of 
corporate tax attributes. 



92 



A 607 Tax Accounting 

Prerequisite: A 601. Investigation of such areas as: problems of 
allocating income and deductions to the proper tax year, permissible tax 
accounting methods, depreciation, inventory methods, net operating 
losses, installment reporting, change in accounting method and 
comparison of business and tax accounting principles. 

A 608 Estate and Gift Taxation 

A comprehensive introduction to, and analysis of, the federal 
estate and gift tax laws including basic principles of estate planning. Pro- 
cedures for preparation of the estate and gift tax returns are treated. 
Brief coverage is also given to state death and inheritance taxes. 

A 609 State and Local Taxation 

The tax problems encountered at the state and local level by busi- 
nesses engaged in interstate commerce. Federal limitations on the taxa- 
tion of multistate enterprises and jurisdictional problems are examined. 
Specific areas covered are: license to do business, net income, franchise, 
gross receipts, property, and sales and use taxes. Apportionment 
problems are examined in detail. 

A 610 Consolidated Returns 

Prerequisite: A 604. A thorough analysis of the federal con- 
solidated tax return provisions including eligibility and whether to file a 
consolidated return; intercompany transactions and deferral concepts; 
basis in the disposition of stock of a subsidiary; computation of earnings 
and profits; and mechanics of preparing the consolidated return. 

A 611 Income Taxation of Estates and Trusts 

Prerequisite: A 602. Federal income taxation of estates, trusts, 
grantors, and beneficiaries. Topics are simple and complex trusts, 
throwback rules, taxable and distributable net income, assignment of 
income concepts and income in respect of a decedent, preparation of the 
estate and trust returns. 

A 612 International Taxation 

Prerequisite: A 604. Consideration of the federal income tax 
treatment of nonresident aliens and foreign corporations and the foreign 
income of U.S. residents and domestic corporations; comparison of 
alternative methods of engaging in operations abroad; foreign tax credit; 
allocations under code Section 482; Section 367 rulings; and the effect of 
tax treaties. 

A 613 Taxation of Partnerships and Partners 

Prerequisite: A 602. A study of the federal income tax problems 
encountered in the formation and operation of a partnership, including 
computations of taxable income, sale of a partnership interest, 
withdrawal of a partner, death or retirement of a partner, and distribu- 
tion of partnership assets. Limited partnerships are also covered. 
Procedure for preparation of the partnership return. 



93 



A 614 Federal Tax Practice and Procedure 

Prerequisite: A 601. A study of the history and organization of 
the Internal Revenue Service, the selection of returns for audit and the 
review steps at the administrative level. Code provisions covered will 
include: filing requirements, statutory notices, restriction on assessment, 
statute of limitations, refund procedures, waivers, closing agreements, 
protests and rulings. 

A 615 Research Project in Federal Income Taxation 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours in taxation. This course is 
devoted to a study of the techniques and tools of tax research. Reference 
sources include tax looseleaf services, I.R.S. Cumulative Bulletins, court 
cases, Congressional committee reports, textbooks, published articles. A 
significant research paper devoted to a subject of topical interest is 
required. 

A 621 Managerial Accounting 

Prerequisite: A 600 or 6 credits in financial accounting. Account- 
ing analysis for the managerial functions of planning, controlling and 
evaluating the performance of the business firm. 

A 641 Accounting Information Systems 

Prerequisite: A 621. An examination of the function and limita- 
tions of internal accounting information systems and their relationship to 
other decision-oriented business information systems. 

A 642 Operational Auditing 

Prerequisite: A 621. An analysis of the principles underlying and 
the procedures applying the function of auditing the results of firm- 
related business decisions. 

A 650 Advanced Accounting Theory 

Prerequisite: 6 hrs. of intermediate accounting. Considers the 
theoretical aspects of accepted accounting principles and their 
significance as a frame of reference for the evaluation of accounting 
practices. Considerable attention is focused on the role of regulatory 
agencies and professional accounting organizations with regard to their 
influences upon accounting theory and practice. 

A 651 Financial Accounting Seminar 

Prerequisite: A 650. An examination and evaluation of current 
literature in external accounting issues and related fields. 

A 652 Advanced Auditing 

Prerequisite: 3 hours of auditing. An analysis of the contem- 
porary problems surrounding the attest function performed by the pro- 
fessional independent auditor. EDP auditing is examined in depth. 

A 653 Accounting for the Not-for- Profit Organization 

Prerequisite: 6 hrs. of intermediate accounting. An intensive 
examination of the contemporary views toward financial reporting for 
the not-for-profit organizations. 



94 



A 654 Financial Statements: Reporting and Analysis 

Prerequisite: FI 651. An examination of financial reporting prac- 
tices for financial statement analyses in view of modern theoretical and 
empirical financial decision-making research. 

A 656 International Accounting 

Prerequisite: 6 hrs. of intermediate accounting. An analysis of the 
literature related to the current and growing interest in the development 
of accounting standards for business enterprises throughout the world. 

A 661 Managerial Accounting Seminar 

Prerequisite: A 621. An examination and evaluation of current 
literature in internal accounting issues and related fields. 

A 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students 
and instructor. May be taken more than once. 

A 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or permission of the instructor. 
Independent study under the supervision of an adviser. 

A 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual study under the supervision of 
a member of the faculty. 

A 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent Study I. 

A 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. Periodic meetings and discussions 
of the individual student's progress in the preparation of a thesis. 

A 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Department of Civil and 
Environmental Engineering 

CE 601 Water Treatment 

Advanced design principles and practices in water treatment 
processes; study of unit processes and operations; water treatment plant 
design; methods of population projection; water distribution systems. 

CE 602 Wastewater Treatment 

Advanced design principles and practices in sewage treatment 
processes; study of unit processes and operations; secondary sewage 
treatment plant design; sludge handling and disposal; sewage collection 
systems; introduction to advanced treatment methods. 



95 



CE 605 Solid Waste Management 

Characteristics, volumes, collection and disposal of solid waste 
and refuse. Design of processing, recycling, and recovery equipment, 
landfill design and operation, resource recovery, incineration. 

CE 606 Environmental Law and Legislation 

Review and techniques of enforcement of state and federal 
pollution control laws and regulations; effects on waste treatment 
criteria and design and evaluation of municipal ordinances; preparation 
of environmental assessments and impact statements. 

CE 612 Advanced Wastewater Treatment 

Prerequisite: CH 601, which may be taken concurrently. 
Theories and principles of advanced sewage treatment including nutrient 
removal, demineralization, distillation, ozonation, carbon filtration, ion 
exchange, nitrification; design of facilities; upgrading secondary plants. 

CE 613 Industrial Wastewater Control 

Prerequisite: CH 601. Characteristics of industrial wastes, 
volumes, sources, types; methods of volume reduction, waste segrega- 
tion, recovery, recycle, and waste treatment. 

CE 616 Ground Water Waste Disposal 

Study of effects of disposal of wastewaters in ground waters; 
travel of pollutants through soil; removal of nutrients and pollutants by 
soil interactions; leachate identification and control from refuse disposal 
areas. 

CE 670 Special Topics- Civil Engineering 

A study of related topics of particular interest to students and 
instructor. Course may be taken more than once. 

CE 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 18 graduate hours or permission of chairman of the 
Department of Civil Engineering and adviser. Independent study under 
the guidance of an adviser into an area of mutual interest, each study 
terminating in a technical report of academic merit. Research may be in 
such environmental areas as water resources, stream pollution, solid 
waste management or air pollution. 

CE 695 Independent Study in Environmental Engineering I 

Prerequisite: permission of program coordinator. Independent 
study under the guidance of an adviser into an area designated by the 
program coordinator. 

CE 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent Study I. 

CE 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. Periodic meetings and discus- 
sions of the individual student's progress in the preparation of a thesis. 



96 



CE 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Department of Chemistry 

CH 601 Environmental Chemistry 

Advanced study of the chemical reactions necessary to under- 
stand the impact that man's activities have on the environment. Areas 
considered include water and air pollution, power generation, and the 
release and use of industrial organic chemicals. 

CH 611 Special Topics in Advanced Organic Chemistry 

Advanced course dealing with topics such as stereochemistry, 
photochemistry, natural products and mechanisms of organic reactions. 

CH 621 Chemical Forensic Analysis with Laboratory (4 credits) 

A course intended to present advanced techniques and new 
developments in the identification of various materials such as pigments, 
dyestuffs, food additives, pharmaceutical preparations, polymers, syn- 
thetic fibers, and inorganic material products. Laboratory fee required 

CH 631 Advances In Analytical Chemistry 

A course intended to provide background for the recent 
advances made in instrumentation and current analytical techniques. 

CH 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students 
and instructor. May be taken more than once. 

CH 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual study under the supervision 
of a member of the faculty. 

CH 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent Study I. 

CH 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: Completion of 15 credits of graduate work. 
Periodic meetings and discussion of the individual student's progress in 
the preparation of a thesis. 

CH 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



97 



Division of Criminal Justice 

CJ 601 Seminar in Interpersonal Relations 

Interpersonal communication in teaching, supervision and in 
various work relationships. The criminal justice worker as a resource 
person and facilitator of others is stressed. Humanistic psychology and 
interpersonal psychology provide the theoretical base. 

CJ 602 Seminar in Social Control 

An examination of the formal and informal mechanism of con- 
trolling or conditioning the social behavior of man vis-a-vis the system 
of social norms, laws and institutions. The implication of organizing the 
system of justice under a punishment or rehabilitative ethic will be 
considered. 

CJ 604 Seminar in Theory and Philosophy of Law 

The theory and philosophy of law and the relationship between 
law and society. Emphasis on the nature of the judicial process, the 
issues of law and personal morality, nonvictim crimes, and the relation- 
ship of enforcement agencies to the rules of law. 

CJ 605 Social Deviance 

A survey of theories relating to the scope and nature of the 
crime problem. Consideration of the problems of deviancy, including 
social norms deviancy, mental disturbances, juvenile crime, and the 
various possible and actual responses to deviancy. Various approaches 
to the problem of rehabilitation. 

CJ 607 Seminar in Criminal Justice Institutions 

The machinery of justice in theory and practice. The rule of law 
and its exceptions in the actual administration of justice. Emphasis on 
the progressive changes in the development of children's and adolescents' 
courts, probation and classification clinics. Crime prevention and 
reforms of the criminal law. Special problems of justice and the poor. 
Administrative denials of justice, the insane offender, the white-collar 
criminal and social reconstruction through law. 

CJ 608 Law and Evidence 

Comprehensive analysis of the rules of evidence. Topics include 
judicial notice, presumptions, the nature of real and circumstantial 
evidence, hearsay evidence, confessions and admissions and witnesses. 
Emphasis on evidence in criminal cases. 

CJ 609 Criminological Theory 

An analytical review of the multidisciplinary theories of criminal 
behavior. The impact of various theoretical constructs and concepts on 
practice will be critically evaluated. 



98 



CJ 610 Administration of Justice 

A study of all the steps of the criminal justice system from the 
time the accused is arrested until sentencing to a correctional facility 
with an objective to review all the problems which arise during this 
process and to consider some possible solutions which will benefit the 
individual being processed without subverting the purposes of the 
process. 

CJ 612 Criminal Justice Management 

The development of the theory and practice of criminal justice 
management in the United States. Significant developments and ideas of 
those who have made major contributions to American criminal justice 
management. 

CJ 613 Alternatives to Prosecution 

Areas to be covered will be the history, theory and practice of 
pretrial diversion, as well as the legal, social and administrative prob- 
lems inherent in diversionary approaches. Among the specific alter- 
natives to be examined will be: youth service bureaus, family courts, 
citizen dispute settlement, community responsibility programs and 
various pre-trial intervention programs. 

CJ 615 Forensic Science in the Administration of Justice 

The role of natural science in the administration of justice in its 
broadest aspects. Current concepts, present status and future needs of 
the forensic sciences. Specific topics in the forensic sciences and their 
interrelationships with legal issues will also be included. 

CJ 618 Probation and Parole: Theory and Practice 

The philosophy, theory and methods employed in probation, 
parole and institutional treatment of the offender. The role of authority, 
casework, classification, treatment policy and administrative organiza- 
tion in determining the consequences of correctional practice. 

CJ 619 Seminar in Comparative Criminal Justice Systems 

Prerequisite: CJ 610. A cross-cultural study of police, court and 
correctional systems and methods. 

CJ 622 Learning Theory: Applications in Criminal Justice 

Applications of the psychology of learning to police and 
correction settings. 

CJ 624 Group Process in Criminal Justice 

Small group interaction; both theoretical and experimental facets 
of group process are presented. Group counseling and encounter groups. 

CJ 628 Introduction to Systems Theory 

Concepts of systems theory and systems analysis in con- 
temporary socio-technical environments. 



99 



CJ 630 Delinquency and Juvenile Crime 

Prerequisite: CJ 610. A general introduction to the field of delin- 
quency and crime, including all aspects of the social, legal and personal 
matrix out of which these forms of behavior emerge. Special emphasis 
will be given to the process and implications of delinquency labeling. 

CJ 635 Statistics in the Public Sector 

Statistical techniques applied to the public sector. Descriptive 
statistics: measures of central tendency and variability. Introduction to 
statistical inference including sampling distributions and tests of signifi- 
cance. Some techniques of nonparametric statistics, multiple regression 
and elementary decision theory. Analysis of variance and covariance. 

CJ 637 Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice 

Topics selected by students relating to current issues and con- 
cerns in the field of criminal justice. Each student will be required to 
write a paper and deliver an oral presentation on a selected topic. 

CJ 642 Research Techniques in the Social Sciences 

Research methodology as applied to problems and issues in the 
field of criminal justice. 

CJ 644 Police in Urban Society 

An introduction to some of the current thinking and problems of 
policing in urban society. The course will examine such issues as the 
historical growth of the police, the role and mission of the police, 
measurement of the police tasks, police corruption and other topics of 
interest to the seminar members. The course will stress the development 
of analytic thinking in defining and dealing with police problems. 

CJ 647 Advanced Criminalistics I (4 credits) 

The comparison and individualization of physical evidence by 
biological and chemical properties is presented in lectures and carried 
out in the laboratory. The theories and practice of microscopic, 
biological, immunological and chemical analysis are applied to the exam- 
ination of blood, saliva, semenal fluid, hair, tissues, botanical evidence 
and other material of forensic interest. Laboratory fee required. 

CJ 648 Advanced Criminalistics II (4 credits) 

Advanced microscopic, chemical and instrumental methods will 
be introduced with extensive "hands-on" experience provided by a 
laboratory section. Principles and methods of analysis of microscopic 
and macroscopic evidence such as glass, soil, papers, inks, dyes, paints, 
varnishes, explosives, fibers, drugs and other potential physical traces 
will be discussed in class. Laboratory fee required. 

CJ 651 Problems in the Administration of Justice 

A study of the interaction between the law enforcement official 
and the accused beginning with detention and /or arrest, during which 
time the official is seeking to secure incriminating evidence effectively 
while still protecting the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Amendment constitu- 
tional rights of the "presumed innocent" accused. 



100 



CJ 655 Bureaucratic Organization of Criminal Justice 

Prerequisite: CJ 610. Through an application of modem organ- 
izational theory, a critical analysis of criminal justice agencies will be 
made. Emphasis will be placed on viewing criminal justice in theoretical 
perspective. Linkages between theory and operationalization of 
principles will be made. 

CJ 657 Physical Analysis in Forensic Science (4 credits) 

The classic firearms examination, classification and comparison 
of bullets and cartridges, toolmarks comparison and striation analysis, 
serial number restoration, document examination, voice print identifica- 
tion, fingerprints and polygraphy examination. Laboratory fee required. 

CJ 658 Psychiatry and the Law 

An examination of issues that relate to the interaction between 
the law and mental illness and the general role of forensic psychiatry. 

CJ 659 Biomedical Methods in Forensic Science (4 credits) 

Methods and application of modem toxicology, biochemistry, 
pathology, dentistry and medicine in forensic science. Laboratory fee 
required. 

CJ 660 Forensic Microscopy (4 credits) 

Basic techniques of optical microscopy and the development of 
operational skills for the use of the microscope as a tool of evidence 
detection and evaluation. Microscopical measurements and analytical 
methods will be covered. Laboratory fee required. 

CJ 661 Medicolegal Investigation and Identification 

An introduction to procedures and techniques for medicolegal 
investigation of questioned death, and identification of deceased persons, 
including autopsy technique, odontological procedures and anthro- 
pological approaches. 

CJ 662 Forensic Toxicology (4 credits) 

An in-depth analysis of forensic toxi procedures and methods, 
determination of metallic, volatile and soluble poisons, analysis for 
narcotic drugs, other drugs of abuse, and dosage form or from drugs 
that are commonly abused. Laboratory fee required. 

CJ 663 Advanced Forensic Serology (4 credits) 

Prerequisite: CJ 647. A detailed study of quantitative procedures 
for the biochemical identification of body fluid traces; advanced blood 
grouping procedures in Rh and other blood groups other than ABC- 
detailed discussion of and procedures for isoenzyme and serum protein 
polymorphism phenotyping in stain samples. Laboratory fee required. 

CJ 670 Selected Issues 

A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students 
and instructor. May be taken more than once. 



101 



CJ 672 Innovative Treatment Programs in Corrections 

The theory and practice of a wide range of innovative correc- 
tional treatment modalities will be analyzed. Students will be given the 
opportunity to participate in various experiential exercises and to 
develop and propose new treatment approaches. 

CJ 690 Research Project I (1-3 credits) 

Individual guidance on a research endeavor. 

CJ 691 Research Project II (1-3 credits) 

Prerequisite: CJ 690. 

CJ 693 Criminal Justice Internship I 

The student's formal educational development will be 
complemented by field placement experience in various criminal justice 
settings or agencies. Field experience will be supervised by designated 
agency and departmental personnel. 

CJ 694 Criminal Justice Internship II 

Prerequisite: CJ 693. 

CJ 695 Independent Study (1-3 credits) 

Student will engage in a directed independent learning 
experience, the topic and format to be agreed upon by the student and 
supervising faculty. 

CJ 697 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. Periodic meetings and discus- 
sions of the individual student's progress toward the completion of the 
thesis. 

CJ 698 Thesis II 

Prerequisite: CJ 697. A continuation of Thesis I. 

CJ 699 Thesis III 

A continuation of Thesis II. 



Department of Communication 

CO 601 Basics of Business Media Production Techniques 

This course will provide a survey of the implementation of 
various media in the production of instructional and promotional 
materials specifically for the small and medium business and corporate 
media departments. The course will emphasize both theoretical and 
practical problems of audio and visual systems available to the business 
situation, paying particular attention to the vocabulary and skills which 
make it possible to transfer an idea from the board room to an effective 
media presentation. Laboratory fee required. 



102 



CO 605 Planning Audio Visual Systems for Business 

Prerequisite: CO 601. This course will use the technology 
learned in the basic course, and apply this to the planning of an 
audiovisual center within a business or corporation setting. Students will 
be involved in projects of design and budget. 

CO 609 Scripting the Media Presentation 

This course is designed to show the student how to select the 
medium appropriate to the message, write a treatment, develop a story 
board, script the message and use proper format. 

CO 613 Media Presentations for Business 

Prerequisite: CO 601, CO 609. This course is designed to pro- 
vide the student with an opportunity to produce a major instructional or 
promotional media project for a specific business or corporation. The 
student will be responsible for finding a sponsor for this project which 
will be produced in one or any of the audio/visual formats discussed 
and practiced in prerequisite courses. Laboratory fee required. 

CO 621 The Communication Process 

Major emphasis on the role of communication in a democracy 
and the effects of communication content. Brief treatment of content 
analysis techniques, person-to-person communication and barriers to the 
flow of communication. 

CO 670 Selected Topics 

Prerequisite: permission of the adviser. An in-depth 
examination of a topic in the field of communication which reflects the 
special research of a faculty member, or the special interest of a group 
of students. May be taken more than once. 

CO 693 Internship 

A program of field experience set up by the student and 
approved by the program adviser under the tutelage of a professional in 
the field. 

CO 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual study or research in 
communication under the supervision of a member of the faculty. 

CO 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent Study I. 

CO 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. Periodic meetings with the 
adviser of the individual student's progress in the preparation of a thesis. 

CO 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



103 



Department of Englisti 



E 600 The Uses of Language No Credit 

Limited to qualified international students who speak a language 
other than English. Emphasis upon conversation, pronunciation, 
composition and laboratory work in the English language. 



Department of Economics 

EC 600 Basic Economics No Credit 

A basic theoretical foundation for students who have a defi- 
ciency in economics. The course is a review and refresher of basic 
economic principles. 

EC 603 Microeconomic Analysis 

Prerequisite: undergraduate Principles of Economics or EC 600, 
Basic Economics. Topics in resource allocation and price determination. 
Theories of choice of consumers, firms, resource owners under 
monopoly, monopsony, competition and alternative market forms. 

EC 604 Macroeconomic Analysis 

Prerequisite: undergraduate Principles of Economics or EC 600, 
Basic Economics. An examination of the roles of consumption, 
investment, government finance and money influencing national income 
and output, employment, the price level and rate of growth. Policies for 
economic stability and growth. 

EC 608 Economics for Public Administrators 

An examination of the roles of consumption, investment, 
government expenditure and money influencing national income, output, 
employment and price level, and growth rate. Special emphasis upon the 
roles of fiscal and monetary policy and the economics of contemporary 
social problems. 

EC 620 Economic History of Western Europe 

A survey of the economic development of western Europe from 
1500 to the present. Topics covered include mercantilism, industrializa- 
tion, imperialism and the emergence of planned economics. 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 

A survey of the problems, strategies and policies of management 
and unions in conflict situations and in harmonizing labor-management 
relations. Labor legislation, collective bargaining and alternative 
strategies, productivity and other problem areas in labor-management 
relations are examined. 



104 



EC 627 Economics of Labor Relations 

A survey of labor economics and the economics of labor rela- 
tions using both the tools of economic analysis and institutional 
analysis. The emphasis is on the application of economics to labor 
problems and labor-management relations. 

EC 629 Public Policies Toward Business 

A survey of the economic aspects of governmental and business 
relations. Emphasizes the concept of public control over certain types of 
business and certain forms of business activity. Combination 
movements, pricing procedures, anti-trust laws and agencies enforcing 
them, regulation of transportation and public utilities, rate-making for 
transport, pricing public utility services, consumer protection and social 
responsibility. 

EC 630 Structure of American Industry 

An examination of several major U.S. industries such as 
automobiles, steel, petroleum, defense and agriculture. Some contem- 
porary problems are analyzed. A study of the powerful economic forces 
acting on these industries and how firms react to these forces. 

EC 635 Comparative Economic Systems 

Prerequisite: EC 603-604. Capitalism, Socialism, Communism 
and other economic systems will be examined with respect to their 
theoretical foundations and practical applications, including the inter- 
relationships among economic, political and social institutions. 

EC 641 International Economics 

Prerequisite: EC 603-604. A study of the basic theory and major 
institutions of international economic relations. Examines critically the 
techniques and background of protectionism and free trade, and the 
analysis of customs, unions and price and exchange rate changes. The 
theory of comparative advantage; the gains from trade and the terms of 
trade. The balance of payments and national income. Capital move- 
ments and economic growth. The evolution of the world economy and 
international economic institutions. Effects of growth on trade, and 
trade on growth. Monopolistic practices in international trade. The 
international monetary system and international monetary reforms. 

EC 645 Seminar in Macroeconomic Policy 

Prerequisite: EC 603-604. The impact of fiscal and monetary 
policy upon employment, output and prices. An analysis of past and 
current economic controls and their impact upon the economy. 

EC 650 Economics of Petroleum 

Prerequisite: undergraduate Principles of Economics. A survey 
of the economic development and growth of the American oil industry 
as part of the international oil industry. Economic aspects of the energy 
crisis, oil reserves, conservation, OPEC, U.S. energy conservation 
program, oil pricing, and oil substitutes. Policies of oil exporting 
nations, oil companies and oil consumer nations throughout the world 
will be given special attention. 



105 



EC 653 Econometrics 

Prerequisites: EC 603-604, QA 604-605, or permission of the 
instructor. A presentation of the important statistical concepts used in 
econometrics. Topics covered are regression theory, multiple regression, 
regression extensions, correlation, serial correlation, correlated regressor 
and error, the identification problem, selected estimating techniques. 

EC 658 Transportation Economics 

Prerequisite: EC 603-604. A study of the principal economic 
problems arising in connection with the development and regulation of 
railroads and other modes of transport. 

EC 660 Economic Development of Japan 

Prerequisite: EC 603-604. A study in the modernization and eco- 
nomic growth of modern Japan since the Meiji Restoration (1869). 
Topics include the role of government and planning, and of foreign 
trade, investment and technology; resource allocation, economic 
organization, capital formation, agricultural policies, population growth 
and social change. 

EC 665 Urban and Regional Economic Development 

Prerequisite: EC 603-604. Structure of the urban and regional 
economy; goals, processes, problems and policy in urban and regional 
economic development. 

EC 668 Economics of Crime 

Prerequisite: EC 603-604. Topics include the economic costs of 
crime; the costs of preventing crime; the impact of white collar crime on 
American society. 

EC 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students 
and instructor. May be taken more than once. 

EC 687 Collective Bargaining 

Prerequisite: EC 625. Emphasis on the negotiating process. The 
labor contract as it involves wages, worker security, management author- 
ity and handling of grievances arising during the life of the contract. 

EC 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or permission of the instructor. 
Independent study under the supervision of an adviser. 

EC 692 Readings in Economics 

EC 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual study under the supervision of 
a member of the faculty. 

EC 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent Study I. 



106 



EC 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. Periodic meetings and discus- 
sions of the individual student's progress in the preparation of a thesis. 

EC 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Department of Electrical Engineering 

EE 603 Discrete and Continuous Systems I 

Prerequisite: M 624. Discrete and continuous linear system 
models. State variable representation and transfer function representa- 
tion. Feedback control systems, stability, performance and design 
criteria. State variable and compensation synthesis. Nonlinear systems, 
describing functions and phase plane techniques. Stability methods of 
Liapunov. 

EE 604 Discrete and Continuous Systems II 

Prerequisite: EE 603. 

EE 605 Modern Control Systems 

Prerequisite: EE 604. Advanced topics in control systems. May 
include optimal control, dynamic programming, variational approaches, 
adaptive control, sampled data systems, signal modulated systems, 
random signal methods. 

EE 608 Computer- Aided Design 

Prerequisite: M 624. Numerical algorithms for engineering 
systems analysis. The design problem and performance measures. 
Optimization of networks and filters. Parameter sensitivities. Device 
modeling and equivalent circuits. 

EE 615 Introduction to Computer Logic 

Prerequisite: IE 603 (or equivalent). Introduction to logic 
elements and to their application in digital networks for processing 
numerical data. The course deals with analysis and design techniques of 
combinational and sequential networks and includes a discussion of logic 
variables, switching functions, optimal realizations, multivariable 
systems. Design examples will include logic circuits for addition, 
multiplication, counting, parity generation and detection. 

EE 630 Electronic Instrumentation I 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Design of modern elec- 
tronic instrumentation. Circuit and system examples, evaluation and 
design techniques. Emphasis on practical applications including design 
theory and the circuit techniques used in linear integrated devices. 
Variety of electronic instrumentation including computer interfaces, 
signal conditioners, waveform generators and shapers, filters, V/F, A/D, 
D/A converters and other special purpose circuits. 



107 



EE 631 Electronic Instrumentation II 

Prerequisite: EE 630. 

EE 634 Digital Signal Processing I 

Prerequisite: EE 603. A study of the theories of digital signal 
processing and their applications. Topics include discrete time signals, Z 
transform, the discrete Fourier Transform, the FFT, digital filter design 
techniques, homomorphic signal processing and various applications of 
digital signal processing. 

EE 635 Digital Signal Processing II 

Prerequisite: EE 634. 

EE 640 Computer Engineering I 

A study of the structure and organization of POP 11-10 
computer. Operating system, peripheral devices, addressing memory, 
assembler instruction set, programmed requests, real-time software 
modules, assembler language programming. 

EE 641 Computer Engineering II 

Prerequisite: EE 640. Applications of computers to physical 
systems for monitor control functions. Interfacing using hardware 
modules. Case studies may include synchronous motor transient studies, 
shock wave phenomena, dynamic chemical reaction monitoring and 
control, signal proccessing, sampled data control systems. Students must 
complete a project. 

EE 645 Power Systems Engineering I 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Concepts and methods of 
analysis and design of modern power systems will be treated. This will 
include the network representation of power systems, matrix methods, 
symmetrical components and the use of the computer in the solution of 
problems such as short circuit fault calculations, load flow study, 
economic load dispatching and stability. Other topics may include 
protection, relaying or transmission system design. 

EE 646 Power Systems Engineering II 

Prerequisite: EE 645. 

EE 650 Random Signal Analysis 

A study of the theory of random signals and processes. Topics 
include a review of probability, random signals, auto and cross correla- 
tion, power density, spectral analysis of random signals. 

EE 658 Microprocessors - Theory & Applications 

Prerequisite: EE 640. A study of the techniques and methods of 
designing digital systems using a microprocessor as the basic unit. 
Microcomputer assembly language, operating systems, input/output 
devices, programmable read-only memories and interfacing. 



108 



EE 670 Special Topics - Electrical Engineering 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. A study of selected topics 
of particular interest to students and instructor. Course may be taken 
more than once. 

EE 695 Independent Study I 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. A planned program of 
individual study or research under the supervision of a faculty member. 

EE 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent Study I. 

EE 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: completion of 15 credits of graduate work. Indi- 
vidual student project under supervision of faculty adviser. Written and 
oral report required. Student must enroll in 6 credits of thesis. 

EE 699 Thesis II 

A Continuation of Thesis 1. 



Courses in the 
Executive IVI.B.A. Program 

EXID 903 The Communication Process 

Communication needs in corporate staff development: cohe- 
sion, cooperation, and consensus through effective communication 
management. The role of communication in thought processes and 
problem solving. 

EXID 906 The Management Process 

The role of executives and managers in administrative and 
operational processes. Topics include organizational goals and structure, 
planning and performance controls and resource management. 

EXID 909 Business and Government Relations 

Recent developments and future directions of the business and 
government interface. Includes contracts, affirmative action, labor 
negotiation machinery, regulatory agencies and anti-trust legislation. 

EXID 912 Financial Accounting 

Analysis of the objectives, standards and methods embodied 
in the financial accounting information system. Emphasis is upon finan- 
cial reporting standards as they relate to financial position, results of 
operations and changes in financial position. 

EXID 915 Quantitative Decision Making 

Examination of statistical methods and their relevance to deci- 
sion making under uncertainty. Includes an introduction to probability, 
elements of statistical decision theory and Bayesian analysis. 



109 



EXID 918 Managerial Economics 

Application of economic analysis to business forecasting, 
planning and policy formation. Topics include cost-benefit analysis, cost 
estimation and break-even analysis. 

EXID 921 Executive Development Seminar 

Examination of a variety of methods of executive develop- 
ment. Role-playing, business games, sensitivity training and transac- 
tional analysis. 

EXID 924 Financial Management I 

Analysis of financial decision models for investment, financ- 
ing and dividend decisions of the profit -oriented firm. Includes capital 
budgeting, capital structure and the cost of capital and dividend policy. 

EXID 927 Financial Management II 

Analysis of financial decision models for the management of 
working capital. The management of current assets and the related 
financing mixture. 

EXID 930 Marketing Management 

The marketing concept and corporate decision making with 
respect to product planning, advertising and promotion, sales manage- 
ment, distribution channels and price policies. 

EXID 933 International Business Seminar 

Examination of the theory of international trade, exporting 
and importing, cultural dynamics and comparative management and 
marketing systems. 

EXID 936 Logistics and Distribution 

The design, administration and control of product flows. The 
importance of total cost planning and alternate channel strategies. 

EXID 939 Operations Research and Management 

Analysis of management science techniques from the executive 
perspective. Focus on understanding the value of inventory and systems 
models, forecasting methods and simulation techniques. 

EXID 942 Managerial Accounting 

Examination of accounting tools for planning, controlling and 
evaluating the economic performance of the firm. Topics include 
budgeting, flexible budgets, standard costs, contribution reporting, 
responsibility accounting and decision analysis. 

EXID 945 Human Resource Management 

The effective management of the aggregate human resource in 
the modern organization. Analysis of personnel policies and procedures, 
manpower planning and employee training and policies. 



110 



EXID 948 Labor-Management Relations 

Contemporary issues in labor-management relations are 
analyzed including collective bargaining, grievance-arbitration 
procedures and the expanding impact of organized labor on manpower 
management. 

EXID 951 Marketing Management Seminar 

Current issues and topics in marketing management. Includes 
recent regulatory rulings, consumerism and related areas. 

EXID 954 Organizational Development 

Various methods for effective organizational development in 
contemporary environments. Analysis of means to improve existing 
organizations in consideration of past history and changing value 
structures. 

EXID 957 Corporate Policy and Strategy 

Analytical frameworks are developed through the study of 
major corporate policies and strategies. Focus is upon the total organi- 
zation and comprehensive operation procedures of the complex 
corporation. 

EXID 960 The Executive Seminar 

The capstone course of the program. Four separate one- 
meeting topics such as reducing executive stress, increasing effectiveness, 
the executive role in business and society, etc. 



Courses in Finance 
Department of Accounting 

FI 615 Finance 

Prerequisites: EC 603-604, QA 604, A 600 or equivalent. The in- 
vestment, financing and valuation of business firms. Topics include: dis- 
counted cash flow, return on investment, investment decisions under 
uncertainty, long-and short-term sources of funds, optimal financial 
structure, cost of capital, dividend policy. (Expansion, merger, working 
capital management and failure and reorganization may also be 
covered.) 

FI 617 Financial Institutions and Capital Markets 

Prerequisites: FI 651, FI 615. This course stresses the financial 
management of financial institutions and capital market. Analyzes the 
institutional and theoretical structure of monetary change and the man- 
ner in which financial institutions and markets transmit and influence 
the impact of monetary policy. Special attention to the role of non- 
monetary financial intermediaries, the structure and regulation of capital 
markets, and the functions of market yields as the price mechanism that 
allocates saving to various categories of economic investments. 



m 



FI 619 Monetary and Central Banking Policy 

Prerequisite: FI 615. The impact of monetary change upon 
employment, output and prices; the formulation and execution of 
Federal Reserve policy designed to regulate money, credit and interest 
rates. 

FI 620 Working Capital Management and Planning 

Prerequisite: FI 615. The examination and understanding of 
working capital management, leasing, mergers, and acquisitions and 
overview of multinational finance. 

FI 645 Corporate Financial Theory 

Prerequisites: FI 615, FI 651. An analysis of the theoretical struc- 
ture supporting optimum financial decision making by the business firm. 
Emphasis is placed upon the determination of the combination of invest- 
ment, financing and dividend decisions that maximizes the valuation of 
the firm within a security market context. 

FI 649 Security Analysis 

Prerequisite: FI 651. An analysis of the determinants of valuation 
for fixed income securities, common stocks, convertible securities and 
common stock warrants. Emphasis is placed upon the information and 
techniques relevant to security valuation and selection and the structure 
and workings of the securities markets. 

FI 651 Portfolio Management and Capital Market Analysis 

Prerequisites: FI 615, QA 605 or permission of instructor. Con- 
siders the theoretical structure for the procedures (security analysis, 
portfolio analysis and portfolio selection) which constitute the process of 
portfolio management, as well as their limitations in practice. Additional 
attention is placed upon the logical implications of portfolio analysis for 
capital market theory. 

FI 655 Commodity Market Analysis 

Prerequisites: FI 615, FI 651. A conceptual and operational 
examination of the markets in which commodities are traded, the par- 
ticipants and major exchanges including an analysis of the major 
commodities traded and the factors influencing their prices. 

FI 661 Real Estate: Principles and Practices 

Prerequisite: FI 615. Real estate from the investor's point of view. 
Impact of taxation on real estate investments. Emphasis on commercial 
land use through the use of case studies and problems. 

FI 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students 
and instructor. May be taken more than once. 

FI 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or permission of the instructor. 
Independent study under the supervision of an adviser. 



112 



FI 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual study under the supervision of 
a member of the faculty. 

FI 696 Independei.t Study II 

A continuation of Independent Study I. 

n 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. Periodic meetings and discus- 
sions of the individual student's progress in the preparation of a thesis. 

FI 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Department of Hospitality 
Administration 

HM 610 Content Seminar in Hospitality/ Institutional/ Tourism 
Administration 

Detailed analysis of recent developments in tourism, mass food 
service and lodgings administration. 

HM 625 Supervisory and Leadership Development in Tourism, 
Hospitality and Institutional Operations 

An incident approach is used to provide a cross section of 
supervisory situations in hospitality management. Emphasis is given to 
particular situations involving leadership developments, ethical behavior 
and formal and informal organizations of social behavior. 

HM 630 Personnel and Labor Relations in the 

Hospitality / Tourism/ Institutional Fields 

Topics include organizational behavior, personnel selection, 
placement, supervision, job evaluation, wage and salary administration, 
motivation morale and union-management relations. Case studies and 
role playing are integral parts of the course. 

HM 635 Applied Dietetics for Health Care Professionals 

Examines the competencies necessary to produce a wholesome, 
nutritionally sound menu for health care and community food service 
operations. Topics covered are the U.S. Recommended Daily Dietary 
allowances for vitamins, minerals, proteins, fats and carbohydrates as 
well as the adjustment of calorie needs for people according to age, 
build, ambulatory or sedentary needs and special diets. 

HM 640 Haute Cuisine for Hospitality Executives 

An advanced course which covers the study and preparation of 
classical food items and service of the major world cuisines, culminated 
with the serving of a formal banquet. Laboratory fee required. 



U3 



HM 655 Development of Hotel/Restaurant/Institutional Food Services 

Examines the processes for developing profitable hotel, 
restaurant and institutional services. Some of the characteristics, oppor- 
tunities, risks and decisions involved in starting hospitality and travel 
enterprises and institutional food services are studied. Emphasis is on 
alternative financing. 

HM 660 Comparative Tourism 

A detailed study of tourism developments in Connecticut com- 
pared with similar developments in a foreign state. Arrangements will be 
made for an on-site visit to a foreign country to facilitate the 
comparative study. 

HM 670 Special Topics in Hospitality, Dietetics 
and Tourism Administration 

An in-depth examination of topics in the field of hotel, 
restaurant, dietetics and tourism which reflects the special interest of a 
group of students. 

HM 690 Research in Tourism/Hospitality/Institutional Administration 

Independent study under the supervision of a faculty member. 

HM 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual study under the supervision 
of a faculty member. 

HM 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent Study I. 

HM 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours, permission of an adviser. 
Periodic meetings and discussions of the individual student's progress in 
the preparation of a thesis. 

HM 699 Thesis n 

Prerequisite: HM 698. A continuation of HM 698, Thesis I. 



Department of Humanities 

Colloquia: 

HU 601-602 Themes in Western Thought and Culture: Greece, Rome, 

Readings in primary sources of some of the classics in Western 
thought from Homer to the Renaissance. The place of these selected 
works in the development of Western ideas. 

HU 606 Humanism and Its Methodology 

A classic idea, work of art, musical composition, work of 
literature, historical event, and the variety of the critical appraisals of it. 



114 



HU 611 Historical Views and Views of History 

A survey of modern Western Historiography with particular 
attention to the methodology of recent and contemporary historians. 

HU 616 Art and Thought of the Renaissance 

A study of the achievements of some of the major figures of the 
Renaissance in art, music, philosophy, natural science, literature, drama. 

HU 621 The Age of the Enlightenment 

Philosophical background of the Age of Reason and its effects 
upon the art, music, and literature of the period. 

HU 626 The Age of Darwin 

Scientific thought of the period and its effect upon religious and 
philosophical ideas, upon art and literature, and upon the development 
of sociological thought. 

HU 631 Culture and Ethics in the Modern Age 

Popular attitudes and rational concepts that determine the 
structure of contemporary America. 

HU 636 Philosophical Thought 

An examination of the changes in meaning and use of such 
enduring themes as certainty, existence, God, justice, knowledge, law, 
right, good. 

HU 638 Structuralism and Structural Linguistics 

An introduction to the basic principles of structuralism, with 
special emphasis given to elements of language and linguistic theory. 

HU 641 Technology and Human Values 

The influence of applied science and technology on our concep- 
tions of ourselves, our society, and our environment. 

HU 646 The Social Sciences in Our Time 

How the social sciences are related to the humanities, estimates 
of the human condition in the light of developments in sociology, 
history, political science, psychology and economics. 

Seminars: 

HU 651-689 Seminars 

Study of a variety of current subjects and specialized areas of 
study within the designated field. Students may take more than one 
seminar in the same general area. 

HU 651-659 Topics in Humanities 

HU 661-669 Topics in History 

HU 671-679 Topics in Philosophy 



115 



HU 681-689 Topics in the Natural, Physical and Social Sciences 

HU 691-695 Independent Study 

A planned program of individual study or research under the 
supervision of a member of the faculty. 

HU 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. Periodic meetings and 
discussions of the individual student's progress in the preparation of a 
thesis. 

HU 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Courses in International Business 
Department of Marketing 

IB 643 International Business Operations 

Prerequisites: EC 603-604. A summary of the economic, foreign 
environment and instructional concepts and constraints encountered by 
international business, and how they apply to decisions by managers of 
business operations and makers of official policy. 

IB 644 Import and Export Business 

Prerequisites: MK 609, IB 643. A managerial approach to inter- 
national marketing; emphasis on controllable and uncontrollable 
variables affecting marketing strategies, evaluation of foreign suppliers, 
methods of financing imports and exports, and documentation for 
import and export marketing. 

IB 645 Structure of World Markets 

Prerequisites: MK 609, IB 643. An intensive study of Asia, 
western and eastern Europe and South America as a complementary 
trade region for the United States firm. The area is surveyed as a present 
and potential market as well as an import source. Consideration is given 
to the historical and racial background of the people; their political, 
social and educational development; the resources and economic 
development of the countries in the area; and business practices unique 
to the area and its countries. 

IB 651 Comparative Marketing 

Prerequisites: MK 609, IB 643. A systematic study of the national 
and regional basis of socioeconomic conditions and of distributive 
business activities. The analysis of international similarities and 
differences in marketing functions, structures, processes, and factors as 
related to the physical, economic, political, social and cultural 
environments. The dynamic changes under way in marketing systems 
are also considered. 



U6 



IB 652 Multinational Business Operations 

Prerequisites: MK 609, IB 643. Managerial problems and 
strategies in foreign operations; structuring international operations 
through acquisition, licensing, or joint venture; the assessment of local 
competition; the impact of foreign environments; and legal, political and 
cultural problems facing the multinational firm in its relationship with its 
host countries. 

IB 670 Selected Issues 

A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students 
and instructor. May be taken more than once. 

IB 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours and permission of the instructor. 
Independent study under the supervision of an adviser. 

IB 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual study under the supervision of 
a member of the faculty. 

IB 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent Study I. 

IB 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. Periodic meetings and discus- 
sions of the individual student's progress in the preparation of a thesis. 

IB 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Department of Industrial Engineering 

IE 601 Introduction to Operations Research /Management Science 

Prerequisites: M 610, IE 607 or QA 604 or equivalent. Introduc- 
tion to the techniques and philosophies of management science and 
operations research. Topics include linear programming, inventory 
analysis, queuing theory, dynamic programming, decision analysis and 
other management techniques. 

IE 602 Computing Fundamentals 

An introduction to computing, including consideration of basic 
concepts and technology, history of automatic computation, algorithms, 
and flowcharts, number systems, system organization, software systems, 
survey of programming languages and of special computer applications. 

IE 603C Introduction to Digital Computers: COBOL 

An introduction to the basic elements of computer science 
including computer hardware, software, information and data process- 
ing. Programming concepts are introduced using COBOL, a common 
business-oriented language. A student who has taken IE 603F will not be 
given credit for IE 603C. Laboratory fee required. 

U7 



IE 603F Introduction to Digital Computers: FORTRAN 

An introduction to the basic elements of computer science 
including computer hardware, software, information and data process- 
ing. Programming concepts are introduced using FORTRAN, a common 
language that is well-suited for scientific and technical work. A student 
who has taken IE 603C will not be given credit for IE 603F. Laboratory 
fee required. 

IE 604 Management Systems 

Techniques of industrial and governmental systems management 
including general systems and organizational theory. 

IE 605 Advanced Business Programming 

Prerequisites: IE 603C or proficiency in language similar to 
COBOL. Advanced programming in COBOL or other business-oriented 
language within an applied business systems context. Laboratory fee 
required. 

IE 606 Advanced Technical Programming 

Prerequisites: IE 603F or proficiency in a language similar to 
FORTRAN. Advanced programming in FORTRAN or other technically- 
oriented language with emphasis on scientific and technical 
applications. Laboratory fee required. 

IE 607 Probability Theory 

Prerequisite: M 610 or equivalent. Probability of events. Random 
variables and expectations; discrete and continuous distributions; 
important standard distributions and applications; moment generating 
functions; central limit theorem. 

IE 608 Assembler Language 

Description of the general functional characteristics of a 
computer's main storage and peripheral units. Interrupt philosophy and 
interrupt service routines. Discussion of the general philosophy of 
assembler instructions, code conversion of I/O to and from main 
memory and familiarization with appropriate reference manuals. Micro 
instructions will be introduced to allow for writing and running of 
assembler programs. Macro instructions will be developed to 
demonstrate techniques for reduced programming time. Laboratory fee 
required. 

IE 610 Computer Systems Selection 

Prerequisites: IE 605 or IE 606, IE 614. Techniques for selecting, 
installing, and operating computer systems and their peripheral equip- 
ment. Concepts of decisions with respect to compiler and hardware 
selection. Development of operating procedures, form design, systems 
charting and documentation. 



118 



IE 611 Budgeting and Control 

Prerequisite: A 600. An analytic approach as applied to the 
principles and policies of operational budgeting and control of expense 
and capital investments. Includes forecasting techniques, development of 
totally integrated systems with traditional financial statements and 
controls from top management to first-line supervision. 

IE 612 Managerial Interactions I 

An interdisciplinary systems approach to human behavior in 
organizations with emphasis on the impact of industrial engineering 
methods on organizational performance. The first course will deal with 
individual motivation and face-to-face interaction in managerial roles; 
the second concentrates on organizational development, job enrichment, 
and modern work attitudes. 

IE 613 Managerial Interactions II 

Prerequisite: IE 612. 

IE 614 Data Information Systems 

Prerequisites: IE 603 or equivalent, IE 604. Introduction to 
automated information systems planning and operations and their 
impact on management decision making, control functions and 
communication capabilities. An overview of concepts and procedures 
with applications in urban environments, large organizations and 
governmental agencies. Techniques presented include PERT/CPM, Gantt 
charting, cost-benefit analysis. 

IE 615 Transportation and Distribution 

Prerequisite: IE 601. Introduction to transportation science with 
emphasis on physical distribution problems. Survey of operations 
research models and optimization strategies and their roles in transporta- 
tion systems management. 

IE 619 Enterprise Design and Evaluation 

Prerequisite: IE 601. An analysis of the principles and methods 
used in estimating the probable economic characteristics of proposed 
enterprises. The student is required to formulate a proposed enterprise, 
including the technical, financial and organizational requirements. 

IE 621 Linear Programming 

Prerequisites: M 610 or equivalent, IE 601 or equivalent. 
Thorough coverage of the techniques and applications of linear 
programming, a powerful operations research tool for optimal allocation 
of limited resources in linear systems. 

IE 622 Queuing Theory 

Prerequisites: IE 601, IE 607. Elements of queuing theory includ- 
ing finite and infinite cases. Single server and multiple server parallel 
channels, series queues and special cases are analyzed. Experimental 
methods, including simulation, are presented in the context of industrial 
environments. 



119 



IE 623 Decision Analysis 

Prerequisite: QA 605 or IE 607. Decision theory, game theory, 
and stochastic decision processes. Benefit-cost analyses under 
uncertainty. 

IE 624 Quality Analysis 

Prerequisite: IE 607. Concepts of quality and statistical quality 
analysis. Sampling techniques and decision processes. 

IE 643 Reliability and Maintainability 

Prerequisites: IE 602, IE 607 or QA 604. The basic theory and 
methodology of reliability and maintainability, including application of 
discrete and continuous distributions and statistical designs. Reliability, 
estimation, structure models and growth models. 

IE 651 Human Engineering I 

A broad coverage of the physiological, psychological, and socio- 
logical aspects of man and the society in which he lives and works. 
Special topics include human factors, motivation, group dynamics and 
ekistics. 

IE 652 Human Engineering II 

Prerequisite: IE 651. 

IE 655 Value Engineering 

Consideration of value analysis from the point of view of design, 
manufacturability, procurement, installation and maintainability in order 
to optimize value in products. 

IE 670 Current Topics in Computer and Information Science 

Prerequisites: IE 601, IE 603, or permission of the instructor. An 
examination of new developments or current practices in computer and 
information science. A topic will be selected for thorough study; 
possible subject areas include data structures, recent hardware or soft- 
ware advances, specialized applications. Content may vary from 
semester to semester 

IE 671 Current Topics in Operations Research 

Prerequisites: IE 601, IE 607, IE 621 or permission of the 
instructor. An examination of new developments or current practices in 
operations research. A topic will be selected for thorough study; possible 
subject areas include non-linear programming, network theory, 
scheduling techniques, specialized applications. Content may vary from 
semester to semester. 

IE 672 Current Topics in Industrial Engineering 

Prerequisite: IE 601 or permission of the instructor. An examina- 
tion of new developments or current practices in industrial engineering. 
A topic will be selected for thorough study — possible subject areas 
include reliability, production engineering, human factors, specialized 
applications. Content may vary from semester to semester. 



120 



IE 681 System Simulation 

Prerequisites: IE 601 or equivalent, IE 606 or equivalent. A study 
of the behavior of systems using computer simulation models of their 
organizational structure and decision criteria. Laboratory fee required. 

IE 682 Compiler Design 

Prerequisite: IE 605 or IE606 or permission of the instructor. 
Design and operation of assemblers and macroprocessors. Introduction 
to compiler design. Metalanguage. Lexical and syntactic analysis. Inter- 
pretive systems. Control of translation, loading and execution. 
Relocating loaders and overlay generation. Symbolic coding systems. 

IE 683 Systems Analysis 

Prerequisites: IE 601 or QA 605, IE 614. Techniques and philos- 
ophies defining the concept of systems analysis are presented in detail 
and illustrated with large scale case studies. Diverse systems are 
analyzed covering the social, urban, industrial and military spheres. 
Techniques presented include utility theory, decision analysis, and 
technological forecasting. 

IE 684 Multiprogramming Systems 

Prerequisite: IE 605 or IE 606 or permission of the instructor. 
Topics in the areas of operating systems and computer architecture. 
Multiprogramming and multiprocessor systems. Dynamic storage alloca- 
tion and virtual memory systems. Time-sharing systems. On-line, real- 
time systems. 

IE 685 Theory of Optimization 

Prerequisites: calculus, IE 603F or equivalent. Nonlinear and 
dynamic programming with special reference to computer analysis of 
optimization problems. 

IE 686 Inventory Analysis 

Prerequisites: IE 601, IE 607 or QA 605. Inventory theory and 
practical applications in operating inventory systems. Model construc- 
tion, optimization and computer simulation. 

IE 688 Design of Experiments 

Prerequisite: IE 689 or three credit hours of statistical inference. 
Principles of modern statistical experimentation and practice in use of 
basic designs for scientific and industrial experiments; single factor 
experiments, randomized blocks, latin squares; factorial and fractional 
factorial experiments; surface fitting designs. 

IE 689 Descriptive and Inferential Statistics 

Prerequisite: IE 607 or equivalent. Inferential statistical designs, 
including basic statistical tests and analysis of variance. Statistical 
theories and application of correlation analysis, multiple linear 
regression, nonlinear regression, and analysis of covariance. 



121 



IE 690 Seminar Project 

Prerequisites: 15 credit hours and permission of the program 
coordinator. Independent study under the guidance of an adviser into an 
area of mutual interest, such study terminating in a technical report of 
academic merit. Research may constitute a survey of a technical area in 
industrial engineering, operations research or computer science, or may 
involve the solution of an actual or hypothetical technical problem. 

IE 695 Independent Study I 

Prerequisite: permission of the program coordinator. Independent 
study under the guidance of an adviser into an area designated by the 
program coordinator. 

IE 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent Study I. 

IE 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. Periodic meetings and discussion 
of the individual student's progress in the preparation of a thesis. 

IE 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Courses in Business Law 
Department of Accounting 

LA 673 Business Law I: Contracts and Sales 

Survey of the legal aspects of contracts and the results of con- 
tractual obligations. Legal problems stemming from the distribution of 
goods; generally the rights and duties of buyers and sellers and the 
remedies available to them. 

LA 674 Business Law II: Business Organizations and Negotiable 
Instruments 

Basic introduction to problems of formation and operation of 
legal groups and general legal survey of the role of agency, partnerships 
and corporations and other complex entities in modern society. 

LA 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students 
and instructor. May be taken more than once. 

LA 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or permission of the instructor. 
Independent study under the supervision of an adviser. 

LA 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual study under the supervision of 
a member of the faculty. 



122 



LA 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent Study I. 

LA 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. Periodic meetings and discus- 
sions of the individual student's progress in the preparation of a thesis. 

LA 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Courses in Logistics Management 
Department of IVIanagement Science 

LG 660 Logistics Technology and Management 

Designed to provide to the student a broad survey of the wide 
range of logistics activities. Subjects covered: the concepts of the inte- 
grated logistics management system, customer interfaces, inventory 
management and support of spares and supplies, physical distribution 
management as well as the logistical organization, planning and admin- 
istration. Discussion in the courses includes also the quantitative 
analytical techniques and computational tools commonly used in the 
logistical decision-making process. 

LG 663 Logistics Management in the System Acquisition Process 

Designed to provide students a general knowledge of the man- 
agement process for the acquisition of equipment and material. Subject 
topics are: test and evaluations, specifications as a procurement instru- 
ment, procurement methods, type of contracts, etc. 

LG 665 Integrated Logistics Support Analysis 

Designed to provide students an opportunity to understand the 
concept of Integrated Logistics Support (ILS), and an overview of each 
of the elements of logistics specialties, their interface and interaction, as 
well as the integration of the the separate logistics specialties into a 
coherent effort and output. Topics covered in this course are reliability, 
maintainability, life cycle cost, ILS management and major ILS decisions 
involved, test and support equipment, personnel and training, 
warranties, etc. 

LG 669 Life Cycle Cost Analysis 

A study of Life Cycle Cost Analysis (LCCA), a new state-of-the- 
art management tool used in the defense industry to assist and advise 
decision-makers to identify a preferred choice among all possible 
alternatives in acquisition of a new equipment and /or system. Topics 
discussed will be techniques and concepts such as the total cost concept 
(e.g., acquisition cost plus the cost of ownership including both the 
operating cost and the support cost); the fixed cost criterion (e.g., 
greatest effectiveness); the fixed effectiveness criterion (e.g., least cost) 
and the marginal utility criterion (e.g., least cost per unit of 
effectiveness), etc. 



123 



LG 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students 
and instructor. May be taken more than once. 

LG 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or permission of the instructor. 
Independent study under the supervision of an adviser. 

LG 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual study under the supervision of 
a member of the faculty. 

LG 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent Study I. 

LG 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. Periodic meetings and 
discussions of the individual student's progress in the preparation of a 
thesis. 

LG 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Department of Mathematics 

M 610 Fundamentals of Calculus and Linear Algebra 

Prerequisite: M 115 or equivalent. Review of algebra. Topics 
from calculus, including differentiation and integration methods, applied 
to problems in science, business, and the social sciences. Linear algebra, 
systems of linear equations and matrix methods. 

M 620 Numerical Analysis 

Prerequisite: 9 credit hours of calculus and programming ability 
in FORTRAN or permission of the instructor. Algorithms for obtaining 
numerical solutions on computers. Topics include: solution of deter- 
minants, solution of systems of linear equations by direct and iterative 
methods numerical integration, differentiation and solution of differen- 
tial by finite difference methods. Laboratory fee required. 

M 624 Applied Mathematics 

Topics in applied mathematics including power series solutions of 
ordinary differential equations, special functions, matrix theory, and 
integral transforms. 

M 632 Methods of Complex Analysis 

Prerequisite: graduate standing in engineering or mathematics. 
This course is a study of the applications of the methods of complex 
variables to engineering and physical sciences. Topics include Analytic 
Function Theory, Contour Integration and Conformal Mapping. 



124 



M 670 Special Topics in Mathematics 

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. A study of selected 
topics of particular interest to students and instructor. Course may be 
taken more than once. 

M 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or permission of the instructor. 
Independent study under the supervision of an adviser. 

M 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual study under the supervision of 
a member of the faculty. 

M 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent Study I. 

M 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. Periodic meetings and dis- 
cussions of the individual student's progress in the preparation of a 
thesis. 

M 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Department of Mechanical Engineering 

ME 602 Boundary Value Problems 

Prerequisite: M 624. Topics in complex variables, evaluation of 
integrals via residue theorem, special functions, solution of partial differ- 
ential evaluation by separation of variables, integral transform methods 
for partial differential equations. Green's function. 

ME 603 Approximation Methods 

Prerequisite: ME 602. Techniques for realizing engineering solu- 
tions to complex systems. Asymptotic expansions and perturbation 
methods among topics. 

ME 604 Numerical Methods 

Prerequisite: knowledge of FORTRAN. Quantitative techniques 
adaptable for computer solutions to engineering problems. Curve fitting, 
transcendental equations, simultaneous equations and numerical 
integration and differentiation. 

ME 610 Advanced Dynamics 

Kinematics and dynamics of particles and systems of particles. 
Lagrange's equations. Hamilton's principles and canonical transformation 
theory. The inertia tensor and rigid body motion. 



125 



ME 611 System Vibrations 

Advanced techniques for analysis of vibrations in mechanical 
systems. Multiple degrees of freedom, random noise inputs among 
topics. 

ME 615 Theory of Elasticity 

Index notation, Cartesian tensors and coordinate transforma- 
tion, stress tensor and field equation, analysis of stress and strain in two 
and three dimensions, airy stress function, applications to problems of 
torsion and bending, experimental methods. 

ME 620 Classical Thermodynamics 

Phenomenological equilibrium and nonequilibrium thermo- 
dynamics. Formulation and application of fundamental laws and 
concepts, chemical thermodynamics. 

ME 622 Statistical Mechanics 

Development of the molecular theory of matter; classical and 
quantum statistical results of equilibrium and kinetic properties of solids, 
liquids and gases. 

ME 625 Mechanics of Continua 

Prerequisite: ME 615 or permission of the instructor. Tensor 
analysis, the stress vector and the stress tensor, kinematics of deforma- 
tion, material derivative, fundamental laws of continuum mechanics, 
conservation theorems, constitutive laws, and representative 
applications. 

ME 628 Modern Materials 

Survey of the forefront of current engineering materials and 
processing techniques. Representative topics might include composites, 
superalloys, laser fabrication and continuous casting techniques. 

ME 630 Advanced Fluid Mechanics 

Advanced topics chosen from among the following areas: 
perfect fluids, viscous fluids, turbulence, boundary layer theory, surface 
phenomena, shock waves, and gas dynamics. 

ME 632 Advanced Heat Transfer 

Review of the basic concepts of conduction and radiation. 
Detailed treatment of laminar, turbulent, free and forced convectional 
flows. Computational projects. 

ME 645 Computational Fluid Dynamics and Heat Transfer 

Prerequisite: ME 630; corequisite: ME 604 or M 620. Current 
methods of computer solutions of the conservation equations of fluid 
dynamics. Viscous, incompressible, compressible and shock flows. Real 
gas equations of state. Computer projects. 



126 



ME 670 Special Topics — Mechanical Engineering 

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. A study of selected 
topics of particular interest to students and instructor. Course may be 
taken more than once. 

ME 695 Independent Study I 

Prerequisite: permission of program coordinator. Independent 
study under the guidance of an adviser into an area designated by the 
program coordinator. 

ME 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent Study 1. 

ME 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. Periodic meetings and discus- 
sions of the individual student's progress in the preparation of a thesis. 

ME 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Department of Management Science 

MG 625 Systems Techniques in Business Administration 

An integrated study of the techniques for solving administra- 
tive problems, including the analysis and improvement of organizational 
structures, office procedures, forms design, records management, reports 
and equipment standards. The conduct of a comprehensive systems 
survey using these techniques is explored in depth as are flow charting 
and the preparation of manuals. 

MG 633 Managerial Economics 

Prerequisites: EC 603-604, QA 604-605. A study of the appli- 
cation of the major tools of economic analysis to the problems 
encountered by management in the organization of the firm. Topics 
include the theory and measurement of consumer demand, measurement 
and control of costs, the effects of public policy upon managerial 
decisions and pricing techniques and the allocation of capital within the 
firm. 

MG 635 Purchasing and Materials Management 

This course deals with the management of materials and the 
procurement function in a business enterprise. The fundamentals auxil- 
iary functions, and management of materials activities provide intro- 
duction to an increasingly specialized field of business administration. 

MG 637 Management 

A study of the functions of management planning, organizing, 
directing, controlling, coordinating. 



127 



MG 638 Cost Benefit Management 

Prerequisites: QA 604, EC 603. This course will provide 
students with an introduction and overview to the field of cost /benefit 
management. Fundamental theoretical evaluation of cost /benefit of a 
project will be covered. Other topics discussed include: the selection of 
the best investment criteria, the external environmental spillover effects, 
and the application of cost /benefit management in decision making 
under uncertainty. 

MG 640 Management of Health Care Organizations 

Identification of the characteristics of health care organiza- 
tions and the dimensions of management in such organizations. Exam- 
ination and application of the principles of management necessary for 
the successful operations of health care organizations. M.B.A. students 
in the Health Care concentration take MG 640 in place of MG 637 in 
the core. 

MG 641 Contract Administration 

Prerequisite: QA 600 or equivalent. The administrative aspects 
of the contract, modification, evaluation, and sub-contracting. 
Importance is given to value analysis as it effects government property 
and affects by action of the contractor and the government. Other issues 
are covered such as financial and pattern rights. 

MG 645 Management of Human Resources 

A study of organizational practices in the management of 
human resources. Manpower planning, recruitment, selection, training, 
compensation and contemporary problems of the field. 

MG 650 Venture Management 

Prerequisites: A 621, FI 615, MG 637, MK 609, or permission 
of the instructor. Deals with the establishment of a new business 
venture, covering such topics as site development, market analysis, 
staffing, inventory control, personnel relations and funding. 

MG 660 Comparative Management 

Prerequisite: MG 637. The main focus of this course is to 
develop an understanding of managerial practices in different organiza- 
tions and systems. A conceptual framework is developed for the analysis 
of interaction between managerial processes and cultural factors as they 
affect the management of enterprises in various organizations and 
systems. 

MG 661 Development of Management Thought 

Prerequisite: MG 637. Study of the literature from various dis- 
ciplines in order to determine the thinking and practices of leaders of 
organizations, past and present. The historical perspective of manage- 
ment thought will be developed. The contributions of religion, philos- 
ophy, economics, sociology and psychology to management thought and 
practice will be examined. Emphasis on pioneering works in the 
management of organizations. Case studies of the thinking and practices 
of famous leaders of American business enterprises. 



128 



MG 662 Organization Theory 

Prerequisite: MG 637. A survey of the literature on theories of 
organization with emphasis on contemporary theories. Application of 
the theories to management and organizational problems will be 
attempted. Difficulties arising between theory and practice will be 
examined. 

MG 663 Leadership in Organizations 

Prerequisite: MG 637. Examination of theories and research 
findings from the behavioral sciences that are relevant to leadership in 
organizations. The role of the leader within the organization; the pre- 
requisites, knowledge and practices required for successful leadership 
will be studied. Programs for the development of leaders will be 
explored. 

MG 664 Organizational Effectiveness 

Prerequisite: MG 637. Identification of the criteria necessary for 
developing and maintaining effective organizations. A study of the 
concepts that may be utilized in the management of these criteria. 
Approaches that may be utilized in developing managers in the use of 
these concepts will be examined and applied to problem situations 
through cases and role playing. 

MG 665 Compensation Administration 

Prerequisites: MG 645 and EC 635. A study of the compensa- 
tion function in organizations. Establishing wages and salaries, fringe 
benefits and incentives. 

MG 669 Business Policy and Strategy 

Prerequisites: MG 637 and 3 credit hours of 600-level MG 
course work. Management policies and strategies for the complex 
organization operating in a dynamic environment are examined from the 
viewpoint of the top-level executives of the organization. Develops 
analytical frameworks for the management of numerous elements 
involved in assuring the fulfillment of the goals of the total organization. 
Integrates the student's general business knowledge with the required 
courses in the M.B.A. program. Emphasis is placed on the development 
of oral and written skills by the examination and discussion of cases. 

MG 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students 
and instructor. May be taken more than once. 

MG 675 Readings in Management 

A seminar. Examines the literature in selected areas of 
management. 



129 



MG 678 Personnel Management Seminar 

Prerequisites: MG 637, MG 645, P 619 & EC 625. A seminar in 
the personnel and manpower management function of the modem work 
organization. The use of an integrated behavioral, quantitative, and 
systems approach permits an applied multidisciplinary synthesis of the 
various aggregate manpower management subsystems required in the 
modern work organization. 

MG 679 Industrial Relations Seminar 

Prerequisites: MG 637, P 619, EC 625 & EC 687. A seminar in 
industrial relations and the labor-management relations function of the 
modem work organization. The use of an integrated behavioral, 
economic, and legal approach permits an applied multidisciplinary 
synthesis of the employee relations function required in either non- 
unionized or unionized work organizations. 

MG 680 Current Topics in Business Administration 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or permission of the instructor. 
An integrative course that will examine the role of business in society 
and relate the business firm to its social, political, legal and economic 
environment. While the exact content of this seminar is expected to vary 
from semester to semester in accordance with the varied academic 
interests and professional backgrounds of different faculty handling the 
course, the basic theme is the role of the business firm as the "keeper" of 
the market mechanism and the means for organizing resources in the 
economy. 

MG 685 Research Methods in Business Administration 

Prerequisite: QA 604 or equivalent. Designed to familiarize 
administrators with the tools and potentialities of social research and to 
assist them in the presentation, interpretation and application of research 
data. 

MG 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or permission of the instructor. 
Independent study under the supervision of an adviser. 

MG 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual study under the supervision 
of a member of the faculty. 

MG 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent Study I. 

MG 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. Periodic meetings and discus- 
sions of the individual student's progress in the preparation of a thesis. 

MG 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



130 



Department of Marketing 

MK 609 Marketing 

Prerequisites: EC 603-604. An intensive study of modem 
marketing fundamentals, a study of the decision-making problems 
encountered by the marketing executive and the relation of marketing to 
environmental forces. 

MK 616 Buyer Behavior 

Prerequisite: MK 609. An examination of the principal 
comprehensive household and organizational buyer behavior models and 
the behavioral science theories upon which such applied models are 
based. The buyer is analyzed at the individual level, at the social level 
and at the organizational level. 

MK 639 Marketing Research and Information Systems 

Prerequisites: MK 609, QA 605. A managerial approach to 
marketing information flow, including recognition of information needs 
and an overview of marketing research as part of an information 
system. Special attention to evaluation of research design and mea- 
surement methods, effective utilization of research output, and problems 
encountered in establishing a marketing information system. 

MK 641 Marketing Management 

Prerequisite: MK 609. The treatment of the basic decision prob- 
lems of marketing management in terms of a conceptual framework for 
analysis. Consideration of the role played by human judgments and the 
mathematical tools available to aid in these judgments in a number of 
marketing areas, notably market analysis, pricing decisions, advertising 
decisions, promotional decisions and selection of distribution channels. 

MK 643 Product Management 

Prerequisite: MK 609. The search for new product ideas and 
their evaluation; the organization structure necessary to the development 
and introduction of new products and the management of a product 
line; the commercial aspects of product design, packaging, labeling and 
branding; considerations involved in making product deletion decisions; 
and the social and economic effects of managing product innovation. 

MK 644 Consumerism 

Prerequisite: MK 609. An analysis of the evolution of the 
consumerist movement; how and why it has developed; government 
agencies dealing with consumer problems; the impact of various market 
structures on the consumer; the impact of consumer-oriented legislation 
on marketing strategies; and the responsibility of business to the 
consumer and to society. 

MK 645 Distribution Strategy 

Prerequisite: MK 609. Analysis of channel strategies; theory 
and economic justification of distribution channels; direct and indirect 
methods of control; behavioral states of channel members; costing the 
channel; and management of changes in distribution. 



131 



MK 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students 
and instructor. May be taken more than once. 

MK 680 Marketing Workshop 

This course is centered around a structural model of a business 
firm. The major objective is to provide the student with an opportunity 
to develop managerial insights and skills in dealing with marketing prob- 
lems in a competitive environment. Each of the participants is grouped 
into decision-making units (companies) and assumes the role of a 
marketing executive operating a business firm. These executives will be 
responsible for planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling 
their firm's resources. 

MK 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours and permission of the 
instructor. Independent study under the supervision of an adviser. 

MK 692 Readings in Marketing 

MK 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual study under the supervision 
of a member of the faculty. 

MK 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent Study I. 

MK 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. Periodic meetings and discus- 
sions of the individual student's progress in the preparation of a thesis. 

MK 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Department of Psychology 

P 605 Survey of Community Psychology 

An examination of historical roots and current concepts. A social- 
problems approach to psychological dysfunction. Changing professional 
roles. Community organization and human service delivery; strategies of 
intervention and community change. 

P 607 Special Problems in Community Psychology 

Theory and practice of community psychology with selected 
problems, populations and settings. Emphasis on community psychology 
service issues and problems in the Connecticut area. 



132 



P 609 Research Methods 

Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in statistical methods. 
Introduction to analytic concepts pertinent to sampling techniques, 
research design, variable control and criterion definition. Basic problems 
of measurement, research paradigms, sources of error in research 
interpretation, problems of variable identification and control, and 
consideration of the logic of inference. 

P 610 Program Evaluation in Community Psychology 

Prerequisite: P 609. A systematic study of the processes involved 
in planning, implementing and evaluating social service programs. The 
focus is on action research strategies which integrate the entire process 
from planning and grant application to the evaluation of the program. 

Practicum Seminars and Field Work 

An apprenticeship or on-the-job role in an ongoing program or 
center. Emphasis on developing conceptualizations and insights as a 
result of involvement in the apprenticeship. Placement at a field site for 
8 to 10 hours per week. Weekly class meetings serve two purposes: to 
present specific theoretical material and research findings appropriate to 
each seminar and to allow students to discuss their field training 
experiences. 

P 611 Practicum Seminar I: The Dyadic Relationship 

Content focuses upon one-to-one relationships in community 
psychology. See general description above. 

P 612 Practicum Seminar II: Models of Consultation 

Content focuses upon community consultation. See general 
description above. 

P 613 Practicum Seminar III: Systems Intervention 

Content focuses upon intervention into and change in community 
systems. See general description above. 

P 614 Field Work I 

See general description above. 

P 615 Field Work II 

See general description above. 

P 616 Field Work III 

See general description above. 

P 618 Community Mental Health Philosophy and Concepts 

Considerations of the philosophical bases which underlie tradi- 
tional approaches to mental health. A study of the implied cultural 
values and attitudes which have determined the locations, the settings, 
the methods and the objectives of mental health treatment concepts, 
programs and techniques. 



133 



P 619 Organizational Behavior 

Analysis of various theories of business and managerial behavior 
emphasizing the business organization and its internal processes. 
Psychological factors in business and industry, including motivation, 
incentives and conflict. A study of research findings relevant to an 
understanding and prediction of human behavior in organization. 

P 620 Industrial Psychology 

Psychological theories and research applied to business and other 
organizations. Problems and methods in selection and placement, train- 
ing, performance appraisal, motivation and leadership. 

P 621 Behavior Modification 

Theory and research in behavior modification. Aversive learning, 
desensitization, operant conditioning. Applications in clinical and non- 
clinical settings. 

P 623 Psychology of the Small Group 

Analyses of the behavior and interaction of people in mutual 
gratification groups, committees, work groups and clubs. 

P 625 Advanced Psychology of Human Development 

In-depth exploration of development through the life cycle and 
the developmental impact of family, neighborhood, schools, work, class, 
race, sex, etc.; key theoretical concepts; research findings; community 
intervention. 

P 627 Attitude and Opinion Measurement 

Prerequisite: P 609. Examination of modern methods of attitude 
and opinion measurement. Scale, schedule, and interview formats. 
Respondent sets. Consideration of sampling problems. 

P 628 The Interview 

The interview as a tool for information gathering, diagnoses, 
mutual decision making and behavior change. Use of role playing pro- 
vides the student with insights into nuances of interpersonal relation- 
ships. Applications to selection, counseling and other situations. 

P 629 Introduction to Counseling 

The roles of the client and the counselor in the counseling 
relation. Examination of underlying assumptions. 

P 630 Psychology of Personality 

Major personality theories and their implications. Examination of 
the psychological and organic factors involved in personality develop- 
ment and expression. 

P 631 Social Psychology 

Current problems in social psychology. Attitude scale construc- 
tion, attitude change, language as a social phenomenon, patterns of 
culture, social class, groups, person perception and conformity. 



134 



P 632 Group Dynamics and Group Treatment 

An exploration of the emerging area of group dynamics. The 
structure of groups, their development, process interaction analysis, 
formal and informal groups, group psychotherapy and sensitivity 
training. 

P 633 Problems of Drug Abuse 

Discussion of selected issues and current problems in drug abuse. 

P 634 Personality Assessment 

A critical survey of the theories and issues of personality assess- 
ment. Topics include intelligence, achievement and ability assessment. 
Personality tests and ethical questions associated with psychological 
testing. 

P 635 Assessment of Human Performance with Standardized Tests 

Prerequisite: P 609. Theories, assumptions and constraints 
underlying construction and application of standardized tests employed 
in clinical, educational, governmental and industrial settings. Emphasis 
on selection of appropriate standardized tests for specific applications. 

P 636 Abnormal Psychology 

Etiological factors in psychopathology dynamics and classification 
of neuroses, psychophysiologic conditions, psychoses, personality 
disorders, organic illness, retardation and childhood diseases. 

P 638 Psychology of Communication and Opinion Change 

Characteristics of the source, the situation, and content of 
messages, along with other variables influencing attitudinal modification. 
Cognitive factors and social settings in attitude change. 

P 640 Industrial Motivation and Morale 

Prerequisite: P 619. The meaning of work; theories of motivation. 
Stimulus deprivation and expectation of reinforcement; job satisfaction 
and motivation; pay as an incentive; interventions to increase work 
motivation. Case studies. 

P 641 Personnel Development and Training 

Prerequisite: P 619 or P 620. Identification of skills and devel- 
opmental needs, both from an organizational and individual perspective. 
Techniques for assessment and development of skills, especially at the 
managerial level. Training approaches. Evaluation of training efforts. 

P 642 Organizational Change and Development 

Prerequisite: P 619. The nature of organization development, 
intervention by third-party consultation, change in organization struc- 
ture and role relationships, managerial grid, participation, conformity 
and deviation. 



135 



P 645 Seminar in Organizational /Industrial Psychology 

Prerequisite: P 609 and P 619. An examination of the professional 
psychologist at work in organizations. Emphasis on measurement 
methods, prediction, validation, selection, training, and performance 
appraisal; practitioners in business, industry, research organizations and 
government will provide insights into the application of psychological 
principles and methods. 

P 650 Ecological Psychology 

An in-depth study of the relationship between molar human 
behavior and the sociophysical settings in which it occurs. Human 
behaviors are conceptualized as adaptive responses to environmental 
systems that provide their contexts. Particular emphasis will be placed 
on the ecological match between human service organizations and their 
clients. Class seminars will alternate with on-site study of human service 
agencies. 

P 660 Contemporary Issues in Organizational/Industrial Psychology 

Prerequisite: 12 hours in psychology or consent of the instructor. 
Indepth investigation of topical areas of concern in organizational/indus- 
trial psychology. Topics may include, but are not limited to, the impact 
of EEOC regulations on selection and promotion; assessment centers; the 
role of the consultant in organizations; flex-time, day care, and other 
strategies to accommodate family needs of employees; stress in work 
settings; women in management. Content will be stated at the time the 
course is scheduled. Students may petition for a particular topic they 
feel would fit their academic goals. May be taken twice. 

P 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students and 
instructor. May be taken more than once. 

P 672 Psychology of the Middle and Later Years 

A comprehensive consideration of the psychological aspects of the 
aging process. Sensation, perception, cognition, intelligence, problem 
solving, memory and sexuality, personality changes. Disengagement, 
rigidity. Death and its anticipation. 

P 678 Practicum I 

For students already employed in a managerial or supervisory 
role. A job-related research project is carried out under faculty 
supervision. 

P 679 Practicum II 

Prerequisite: P 678. 

P 693 Organizational Internship I 

For students without experience at the managerial or supervisory 
level. Under faculty supervision, the student engages in field experience 
in an industrial setting. 



136 



P 694 Organizational Internship II 

Prerequisite: P 693. 

P 695 Individual Intensive Study I 

Prerequisite: completion of required courses or 24 graduate hours 
and written approval of department chairman. Provides the graduate 
student with the opportunity to delve more deeply into a particular area 
of study under faculty supervision. 

P 696 Individual Intensive Study II 

Prerequisite: P 695. 

P 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: completion of all required courses or 24 graduate 
hours and written approval of departmental chairman. Periodic meetings 
and discussions of the individual student's progress in the preparation of 
a thesis. 

P 699 Thesis II 

Written approval of departmental chairman. A continuation of 
Thesis I. 



Department of Public Administration 

PA 601 Principles of Public Administration 

The development, organization, functions and problems of 
national, state and local governmental administration. 

PA 602 Public Policy Formulation and Implementation 

The relationship between public administration and the for- 
mulation of public policy is studied. The implementation of public 
policy by administrators based on the politics of the administrator is 
examined in terms of interaction between various group representatives, 
i.e., the legislators, the politician, and pressure group leaders. 

PA 604 Seminar in Communities and Social Change 

Interactions among the community as a social organization and 
education, police and welfare institutions within it; special attention to 
conceptual frameworks and current research or action programs that 
particularly affect minority groups. 

PA 611 Research Methods in Public Administration 

Designed to familiarize administrators with the tools and 
potentialities of social research, and to assist them in the presentation, 
interpretation and application of research data. 



137 



PA 620 Personnel Administration and Collective Bargaining 
in the Public Sector 

Recommended prerequisites: PA 601, PA 604. Study of the civil 
service systems in the United States and the state governments, including 
a systematic review of the methods of recruitment, promotion, 
discipline, control and removal. Explores the effects on work 
relationships of collective bargaining statutes which have been adopted 
by legislatures. Emphasis is placed on Connecticut's collective bargaining 
statutes. 

PA 625 Administrative Behavior 

Recommended prerequisites: PA 601. The problems faced by an 
administrator in dealing with interpersonal relationships and human 
processes. Analysis of individual and group behavior in various govern- 
mental and business settings to determine the administrative action for 
the promotion of desired work performance. Emphasis given to the 
public sector. Participation in actual problem situation discussions and 
case studies. 

PA 630 Governmental Accounting 

Recommended prerequisite: PA 601. The problems faced by an 
survey of the essential principles of governmental accounting, budgeting, 
cost accounting, and financial reporting. The various operating funds, 
bonded debt, fixed assets, investments, classification of revenue and 
expenditures, general property taxes and interfund relationships. 

PA 632 Public Finance and Budgeting 

Recommended prerequisites: PA 601, EC 608, PA 604. State and 
local expenditure patterns, state and local revenue sources, income taxa- 
tion at the state and local level, excise taxation, sales taxation, taxation 
of capital and the property tax. Emphasis on fiscal and economic aspects 
of federalism and federal -state fiscal coordination. The role of the 
budget in the determination of policy, in administrative integration, in 
control of government operations. 

PA 634 Problems of Municipal Management 

Recommended prerequisites: PA 601, PA 604. Study of selected 
problems of city management with emphasis on "housekeeping" and line 
operations. 

PA 635 Statistics for Public Administrators 

Provides a basic theoretical treatment of the nature of statistical 
analysis and its role in economic research design and procedure. 

PA 641 Financial Management of Fiealth Care Organizations 

Theory and application of financial planning and management 
techniques in health care organizations. Emphasis is on financial decision 
making, preparation of short-term and long-term cash, capital, and 
revenue and expense budgets and financial plans to meet the require- 
ments of HCFA and other third parties. 



138 



PA 642 Health Care Delivery Systems 

This course deals with a contemporary analysis of health care 
delivery systems in the U.S. Financial, cost, economic, political and 
organizational issues will be discussed. 

PA 643 Health and Institutional Planning 

Designed to develop skills and understanding of the dynamics of 
health and social planning processes with respect to consumer demand, 
national and local health goals and the optional location of facilities, 
services and manpower. 

PA 644 Administration of Programs and Services for the Aged 

The structure, function and properties of publicly and privately 
funded programs and service organizations providing health services to 
the aged. The economic, political, legal and social issues which affect the 
administration of human service organizations will be studied, with 
emphasis on administration of health care services. 

PA 645 Health Care Economics and Finance 

Recommended prerequisite: PA 641. This course integrates the 
accounting, economics, finance, budgeting, and health insurance 
principles, concepts and analytical tools which are essential to the 
decision-making processes of health care organizations. 

PA 650 Administrative Law 

A search for principles and criteria against which public interest 
can be balanced with private right in the changing patterns of 
government, with particular reference to the American system. 

PA 660 Urban Planning: Theory and Practice 

Recommended prerequisites: PA 601, PA 604. Explores the con- 
cept of physical planning within the urban developmental framework. 
The function of planning in its relationship to the environment. Com- 
prehensive planning with its many ramifications involving the various 
sections of our society. Methods for analyzing problems as well as 
design methods for problem solving. 

PA 661 Problems of Metropolitan Areas 

Analysis of the problems of government and administration 
arising from the population patterns and physical and social structures 
of contemporary metropolitan communities. 

PA 662 Environmental Design 

A nontechnical introduction to the physical sciences of ecology 
and the principle areas of pollution. Industry problems of pollution 
control and effects of recent legislation will be explored to show how 
decisions of society affect our environment. 



139 



PA 663 Urban Housing 

Encompassed are the subjects of housing management, planning, 
finance and policy. Specific topics such as the provision of low-income 
housing, the use of mortgage insurance, interest subsidies, site planning, 
rent controls, code enforcement, mortgage markets, and the rise of 
housing abandonment are stressed. 

PA 664 Zoning and Land Subdivision Regulation 

Recommended prerequisite: PA 660. Ordinance structure and 
planning theory as expressed in texts of ordinances. Selected court cases. 

PA 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students 
and instructor. May be taken more than once. 

PA 671 Administrative Problems 

Exploration of the practical experiences and problem-solving 
situations in the day-to-day activities of a public administrator. 

PA 680 Seminar in Public Administration 

Exact material to be covered will be announced. 

PA 690 Research Project I 

Prerequisites: 15 graduate hours, permission of the public 
administration graduate program coordinator. Independent study for ad- 
vanced graduate students on selected problems in public administration. 

PA 691 Research Project II 

Prerequisites: 15 graduate hours, permission of the public 
administration graduate program coordinator. Independent study for 
advanced graduate students on selected problems in public 
administration. 

PA 692 Readings in Public Administration 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or permission of the instructor. 

PA 693 Public Administration Internship 

Prerequisites: 15 graduate hours, permission of the public 
administration graduate program coordinator. A supervised work 
experience in a cooperating public service agency. Students must be 
available for at least one day per week. 

PA 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual study under the supervision of 
a member of the faculty. 

PA 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Indedependent Study I. 



140 



PA 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. Periodic meetings and discus- 
sion of the individual student's progress in the preparation of a thesis. 

PA 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Department of Physics 



PH 680 Special Topics - Physics 

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. A study of selected 
topics of particular interest to students and instructor. Course may be 
taken more than once. 



Courses in Philosophy 
Department of Humanities 

PL 601 Ethics and the Public Purpose 

The business enterprise seen as the focus of objective and 
relative values and as part of the endeavor toward a common good. 

Department of Political Science 

PS 601 Constitutional Law 

A study of the relation of the judicial process and constitutional 
law to the political process in the United States. Judicial review, 
federalism and separation and delegation of powers. 

PS 602 Civil Liberties and Rights 

An analysis of civil liberties, civil rights, due process, and equal 
protection of the law. An examination of the role of the public official 
in the protection, denial or abridgement of the constitutional and legal 
rights of individuals. 

PS 603 International Law 

A study of the role of international law in the modern state 
system with particular reference to individuals; territorial jurisdiction; 
law of the sea, air and space; and the development of law through 
international organizations. 

PS 605 Criminal Law 

Scope, purpose, definition and classification of criminal law. 
Offense against the person; habitation and occupancy. Offenses against 
property and other offenses. Special defenses. Emphasis on the 
Connecticut penal code. 



141 



PS 608 The Legislative Process 

An analysis of the legislative process in the American political 
system. Stress will be placed on legislative politics in state and local gov- 
ernment. Among areas covered will be legislative functions, selection 
and recruitment of legislative candidates, legislative role orientations, the 
legislative socialization process, the committee system, the legislators 
and their constituencies, legislative lobbyists, legislative decision making, 
legislative-executive relations and legislative organization and 
procedures. 

PS 616 Urban Government 

An examination of the urban political system. Stress will be 
placed on the political aspects of urban government structures. Among 
the areas covered will be formal and informal decision making in urban 
government, community power structures, types of urban government 
structures, the politics of inter-governmental relations and the politics of 
servicing the urban environment (social services, planning agencies, 
education, housing, transportation, health, pollution control and 
ecology, revenue sharing, public safety, neighborhood corporations, 
etc.). 

PS 626 Decision Making in the Political Process 

An in-depth study of decision making in the American system 
with special emphasis upon the various types of mechanisms, i.e., exec- 
utive, legislative, judicial, bureaucratic, organizational and military. The 
influence of intelligence, economic and psychological factors and social 
pressures upon decisions and decision makers will be examined. 

PS 628 Change and Government 

A study of the major processes of change and their consequences 
for the functioning of government. The course will concentrate upon 
changes that may occur through violence, evolution or technology, and 
which may alter the effective operation of government. 

PS 633 The Political Process and the Aged 

A study of the political process as it relates to the aged. Govern- 
mental decision making on federal, state and local levels including 
legislation and its implications. 

PS 635 Law and Public Health 

A course for the civil servant or health professional concerned 
with the laws relating to the public health at the federal, state and local 
level as well as the practical administration of those laws. 

PS 641 The Politics of the World Economy 

An examination of the global politico-economic system and the 
challenges facing world diplomacy. Multinational corporations and 
political structures designed to coordinate global policies for the 
monetary and trade systems, international organizations and their 
impact on third world development, and problems facing industrialized 
nations will be analyzed. 



142 



PS 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students 
and instructor. May be taken more than once. 

PS 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual study under the supervision of 
a member of the faculty. 

PS 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent Study I. 

PS 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. Periodic meetings and discussion 
of the individual student's program in the preparation of a thesis. 

PS 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Courses in Quantitative Analysis 
Department of Management Science 

QA 600 Quantitative Analysis No credit 

Basic mathematics for solving economic and business problems. 
Topics include algebra review, equations and inequalities, graphs, expo- 
nential and logarithmic functions, an introduction to differential and 
integral calculus, and matrix algebra. 

QA 604 Probability and Statistics 

Prerequisites: QA 600 or equivalent. An introduction to 
business statistics. Topics include data analysis and presentation, 
frequency distributions, probability theory, probability distributions, 
decision making under uncertainty, sampling and statistical inference, 
hypothesis testing, t, chi-square, and F tests. 

QA 605 Advanced Statistics 

Prerequisite: "B" or better grade for QA 604. A continuation of 
QA 604. Topics include simple regression and correlation, multiple 
regression, analysis of variance, the general linear model and an 
introduction to time series analysis and forecasting techniques. 

QA 606 Advanced Management Science 

Prerequisites: IE 601, QA 604-605. An examination, from a 
management viewpoint, of the scope of applicability of the methods and 
models developed in IE 601, Introduction to Operations Research/Man- 
agement Science, and QA 604-605, Probability and Statistics, and 
Advanced Statistics. Topics include parametric programming and 
economic interpretation of the dual LP problem, marginal costs and 
revenues, shadow prices, opportunity costs, incremental costs, costs of 
deviation from optimal solution point(s), and location or construction of 
desirable alternate optimal solutions. 

143 



QA 607 Forecasting 

Prerequisite: QA 605 or permission of the instructor. This 
course will present a wide range of forecasting methods useful to stu- 
dents and practitioners of management, economics and other disciplines 
requiring forecasting. The course will focus on quantitative techniques of 
forecasting and will include: smoothing and decomposition approaches, 
multiple regression and econometric models, and autoregressive/ moving 
average methods including generalized adaptive filtering and Box-Jenkins 
methodology. 

QA 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students 
and instructor. Course includes applied regression analysis, analysis of 
variance, factor analysis, multivariate analysis, nonparametric statistics 
and simulation. May be taken more than once. 

QA 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or permission of the instructor. 
Independent study under supervision of an adviser. 

QA 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual study under the supervision 
of a member of the faculty. 

QA 696 Independent Study II 

Prerequisite: QA 695. 

QA 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. Periodic meetings and discus- 
sions of the individual student's progress in the preparation of a thesis. 

QA 699 Thesis II 

Prerequisite: QA 698. A continuation of QA 698, Thesis I. 



Courses in Science 

Department of Biology, Environmental 

Studies and General Science 

SC 601 Ecology for Environmental Engineers 

An introduction to the biological aspects of environmental prob- 
lems. Includes discussion of the concepts of bioecology, organisms 
(microorganisms, plants, animals) important in pollution control and 
detection, and human organ systems most affected by pollution. 

SC 602 Pollutants and the Aquatic Environment 

Prerequisite: SC 601. Discusses the interrelationships among the 
various kinds of pollutants, the morphology of the lake, river, or coastal 
area, and the effects on the individual organism and the ecosystem as a 
whole. Treatment methods using organisms are also discussed. 



144 



SC 603 Air Pollution 

Prerequisite: SC 601. An introduction to air movements in the 
atmosphere and their relation to pollutants; the effect of air pollution 
upon organisms with special emphasis on the effects on human beings. 

SC 608 Water Quality 

Prerequisite: SC 601 or undergraduate biology major. Recogni- 
tion of the organisms and substances of polluted waters; the selection of 
the appropriate methods for collection, testing, and analysis of the data. 
The functions and interrelations of governmental agencies in controlling 
water pollution. 

SC 610 General Environmental Health 

Prerequisite: SC 601 or undergraduate biology major. Principles 
of public health with general emphasis given to environmental factors 
such as air and water pollutants, legal standards and preventative 
measures and their relationships to public health. 

SC 612 Freshwater and Marine Biology 

Prerequisite: SC 601 or undergraduate biology major. Investiga- 
tion of relationships between aquatic systems and the organisms living in 
these systems. Emphasis placed on the manner in which ecological 
studies of aquatic systems are conducted. 

SC 621 Microbiology 

Prerequisites: SC 301, or permission of the instructor. Use of 
current literature to view the beneficial and deleterious impacts of 
microorganisms, from viruses to fungi, on the environment. Topics will 
be diversified and dependent upon student preference. 

SC 622 Bacteriology 

Prerequisites: SC 301, SC 302, or permission of the instructor. 
Study of the characteristics basic to classification of bacteria. Group-by- 
group study of bacteria with emphasis on the major detrimental and 
beneficial contributions of each group as they affect man and the 
environment. Students will be expected to survey recent findings in 
scientific publications. 

SC 642 Physical Aging 

Prerequisite: SC 121 or some undergraduate biology. A study of 
the aging process in man and its effects on the various component 
systems of the body — muscular, skeletal, endocrine, etc. — in health 
and disease. 

SC 670 Selected Topics 

Prerequisite: 9 graduate hours. A study of selected issues of 
particular interest to the students and instructor. May be taken more 
than once. 

SC 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Independent study 
under the supervision of an adviser. 



145 



SC 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual study under the supervision of 
a member of the faculty. 

SC 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent Study I. 

SC 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. Periodic meetings and discus- 
sions of the individual student's progress in the preparation of a thesis. 

SC 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Department of Occupational Safety 
and Health Management 

SH 602 Safety Organization and Administration 

The nature and extent of work accidents and injuries; the 
history and development of the safety movement; objectives, responsi- 
bility, and organization of an effective occupational safety program 
including a knowledge of computation of measurement, workman's com- 
pensation, cost analysis, safety engineer's function, safety motivation 
theory, the human element, and accident investigation techniques. 

SH 605 Industrial Safety Engineering 

An analysis of the major physical hazards in industrial work 
and the attendant safety practices employed to eliminate the hazardous 
condition or minimize the likelihood and extent of injury. This includes 
the hazards associated with machinery, combustion, electricity, material 
handling and fire. 

SH 608 Industrial Hygiene Practices 

Recognition of the magnitude and extent of the health hazards 
characteristic of industrial work. An evaluation of the danger, the con- 
trol of the hazard, and the protection of the worker. 

SH 620 Occupational Safety and Health Law 

A survey of the major federal Occupational Safety and Health 
laws with an emphasis on the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 
1970 (Public Law No. 91-956) as well as state and Federal Workman's 
Compensation law. Studies will focus on the Administration of the laws, 
their major provisions, the enforcement process as well as the Feder- 
al/State interrelationships in this milieu. 



146 



SH 630 Product Safety and Liability 

An investigation into the legal pitfalls and the human concerns 
inherent in the marketing and consumption of goods: Sellers responsi- 
bility, product liability, insurance, labeling requirements, The Consumer 
Product Safety Act and related acts, the procedures for minimizing legal 
risk and maximizing human safety and health. 

SH 650 Seminar in Contemporary Issues 

An investigation into and a critique of the current and future 
developments in the Occupational Safety and Health field and the man- 
agement skills that will be necessary to effectively cope with them. 

SH 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students 
and instructor. May be taken more than once. 

SH 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual study under the supervision of 
a member of the faculty. 

SH 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent Study I. 

SH 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. Periodic meetings and discus- 
sion of the individual student's progress in the preparation of a thesis. 

SH 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis 1. 



Courses in Sociology 
Department of Sociology 
and Social Welfare 

so 601 Minority Group Relations 

An interdisciplinary survey of minority groups in the United 
States with special reference to ethnic, religious and racial factors that 
influence interaction. 

SO 610 Urban Sociology 

Prerequisite: PA 604. The problem of urban growth and 
development. Residential patterns together with the physical 
development of cities and the redevelopment plans. An examination of 
the people and their relationships to the environment. 



147 



so 620 Sociology of Bureaucracy 

A study of some of the classic conceptualizations of 
bureaucracy and their relevance to the structure and functioning of 
American economic and governmental institutions. The course will be 
designed to give students informational and experiential resources with 
which they, as planners and managers, can improve their abilities to 
make effective policy decisions. Strongly recommended for gerontology 
students. 

SO 631 Population Problems and Human Ecology 

A sociological approach to social demography with attention to 
population growth, patterns of distribution of population and the 
population changes and trends. 

SO 641 Death and Suicide 

In-depth analysis of suicide. Traditional theories of suicide are 
analyzed regarding the psychological approach as well as the 
demographic and group analysis of sociology. The goal of the course is 
both academic and practical, stressing community application. Strongly 
recommended for gerontology students. 

SO 649 Seminar in Health and Social Policy 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Analysis of the legal, 
political social, economic and organizational factors in planning and 
providing healthcare services with emphasis on policy formulation and 
implementation. Current health policy issues will be discussed. 

SO 651 Social Gerontology 

Basic introduction to the field of gerontology. Discusses the 
history and definition of the field, the contributions of academic 
disciplines to the field, various perceptions of aging, and explores the 
basic theories, problems and prospects of gerontology. Required of all 
gerontology students. 

SO 652 Seminar in Gerontology 

The seminar will focus on a topic or a series of topics crucial to 
the analysis of the gerontological phenomenon, and will explore 
interdisciplinary techniques and findings. Required of all gerontology 
students. 

SO 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students 
and instructor. May be taken more than once. 

SO 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual study under the supervision of 
a member of the faculty. 

SO 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent Study 1. 



148 



so 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. Periodic meetings and 
discussion of the individual student's progress in the preparation of a 
thesis. 

SO 699 Thesis II 

A continuation ofThesis I. 



Courses in Social Welfare 
Department of Sociology 

and Social Welfare 

SW 651 Social Work with the Elderly I: 
Individuals, Families, Groups 

This course will deal with the problems of aging, focusing 
particularly on the individual and the immediate family. Emphasis will 
be placed on the role of social work in helping the individual and the 
family to deal with issues of discrimination, medical and psychological 
problems, parent-child conflicts, death and dying. 

SW 652 Human Services and the Elderly II: 
Programs, Planning, Policies 

An introduction to the variety of private and public social 
service programs available to the elderly. An attempt will be made to 
identify gaps and propose alternatives for future programming. 



149 




Engineering student applies 
fundamental concepts to 
complex systems. 



150 



BOARD 

ADMINISTRATION AND 
FACULTY 

The Board of Governors 



Henry E. Bartels, President, MRM Industries 

James Q. Bensen, Former Resident Manager, 
Bethlehem Steel Corporation 

Roland M. Bixler, President, J-B-T Instruments, Inc. 

Norman I. Botwinik, Chairman; President, Botwinik Brothers, Inc. 

Mrs. J. F. Buckman 

Robert V. Camillo, Day Student, University of New Haven 

Dr. Ann J. Capecelatro 

Norman L. Christensen, Former President, Sorvall Corporation 

Mrs. Gordon Clark 

Shawn Collins, Day Student, University of New Haven 

Abbott H. Davis Jr., Vice President, Residence, 
The Southern New England Telephone Company 

William S. DeMayo, Partner, Ernst & Whinney 

E. Lucien DeShong, Vice President, New Haven Projects, 
Olin Corporation 

Robert B. Dodds, Vice Chairman of the Board, 
Safety Electrical Equipment Corporation 

Edward J. Drew, Manager, Quinnipiack Club 

John H. Duffy, Director of Manufacturing, Miles Pharmaceuticals, 
Division of Miles Laboratories, Inc. 

Joseph F. Duplinsky, President, Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Connecticut 

John E. Echlin Jr., Account Executive, 
Bache, Halsey, Stuart, Shields, Inc. 

Dominic Falcone, Evening Student, University of New Haven 

John D. Fassett, President & Chief Executive Officer, 
United Illuminating Company 

Frederick G. Fischer, Vice Chairman; Partner, Ernst & Whinney 

John A. Frey, President, Hersey Metal Products, Inc. 

Robert N. Giaimo 

Robert M. Gordon 



151 



Mrs. A. Whitney Griswold 

Stephen E. Grodzinsky, Associate Professor, University of New Haven 

Nathan Hamilton, Attorney at Law 

John W. Harvey, Special Lecturer, University of New Haven 

Phillip Kaplan, President, University of New Haven 

Christopher A. Kolstad, Evening Student, University of New Haven 

George E. Laursen, Vice President - Manufacturing, 
Health and Beauty Division, Chesebrough-Pond's, Inc. 

Robert J. Leeney, Editor, The New Haven Register 

Ellis C. Maxcy, Former President, The Southern 
New England Telephone Company 

Timothy Mellon, President, Eleven Thirty, Inc. 

Paul G. Mohyde, Day Student, University of New Haven 

George I. Mordecai, Secretary -Treasurer, Tyler Chapter Pioneers, 
The Southern New England Telephone Company 

Alexander W. Nicholson, President, Statewide Insurance 

Peter K. Orne, Vice President and General Manager, WTNH-TV 

Herbert H. Pearce, Assistant Secretary; President, H. Pearce Company 

Mrs. William F. Robinson, Sr., Title IV Consultant, 
State Department of Education 

Shirlee Schaffer, Writer and Commentator, WELI 

Fenmore R. Seton, President, Seton Name Plate Corporation 

Leon J. Talalay 

George R. Tiernan, Secretary; Attorney at Law 

Robert M. Totton, Field Underwriter, 
New York Life Insurance Company 

Cheever Tyler, Attorney at Law 

P. Takis Veliotis, Executive Vice President - Marine; 
General Dynamics Corporation, Electric Boat Division 

Gilbert L. Whiteman, Associate Professor, University of New Haven 

F. Perry Wilson Jr., Senior Vice President, The First Bank 

Robert F. Wilson, President, Wallace Silversmiths, Inc. 

Robert C. Zampano, U.S. District Judge 



Administration 



Phillip Kaplan, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., President 

John M. Lupton, Vice-President of Development and 
Institutional Relations 

Walter O. Jewell III, A.B., Ph.D., Executive Assistant; Secretary 



152 



Frank G. Hull, B.S., Treasurer 

Alexis N. Sommers, B.M.E., M.S., Ph.D., Provost 

James W. Uebelacker, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Provost 

Ralf E. Carriuolo, B.A., M.M., Ph.D., Acting Dean of 
the School of Arts and Sciences 

Warren J. Smith, B.A., M.B.A., Dean of the School of 
Business Administration 

Konstantine C. Lambrakis, B.S.E.E., M.S.M.E., Ph.D., 
Dean of the School of Engineering 

Gwendolyn E. Jensen, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School 

Richard C. Morrison, A.B., M.S., Ph.D., Dean of the School of 
Professional Studies and Continuing Education 

Samuel M. Baker, Jr., B.A., B.S., M.A., Head Librarian 

Thomas B. Robinson, B.A., M.Ed., Ed.D., Dean of 
Student Afairs and Services 

Ann Martindale, B.A., M.A., Director of Public Relations 

John E. Benevento, B.S., M.S., Dean of Undergraduate Admissions 
and Financial Aid 



Faculty 1981 - 1982 

Arnold, Joseph J., Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering 
B.S., M.S., Southern Connecticut State College 

Bechir, M. Hamdy, Associate Professor, Civil Engineering 
B.C.E., Cairo University; M.A.Sc, University of Toronto; 
Sc.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Bodon, Jean, Assistant Professor, Communication 

B.A., Birmingham Southern College; M.A., University of Alabama 

Bradshaw, Alfred, Associate Professor, Sociology 
B.A., Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Brady, Gene F., Associate Professor, Management Science 

B.S., University of Virginia; M.B.A., Wayne State University; 
Ph.D., University of Oregon 

Brody, Robert P., Associate Professor, Marketing 

B.A., Wesleyan University; M.B.A., University of Chicago; 
D.B.A., Harvard University 

Brooks, Robert, Assistant Professor, Marketing 

B.S., University of Vermont; M.B.A., New York University 
Brown, David, Professor, Psychology 

B.A., University of Connecticut; M.A., Columbia University 
Carriuolo, Ralf E., Professor, Humanities 

B.A., Yale University; M.M., Hartt College; 

Ph.D., Wesleyan University 

Carson, George R., Associate Professor, Civil Engineering 

B.C.E., City College, New York; M.S.C.E., Columbia University 



153 



Chandra, Satish, Professor, International Business 

B.A., University of Delhi; M.A., Delhi School of Economics; 
LL.B., Lucknow Law School, India; LL.M., J.S.D., Yale University 

Chepaitis, Joseph, Professor, History 

A.B., Loyola College; M.A., Ph.D., Georgetown University 

Chun, Kee W., Professor, Physics 

A.B., University of Pennsylvania; A.M., Princeton 
University, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Collinson, John, Professor, Humanities 

A.B., The Johns Hopkins University; A.M., Harvard University; 
Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University 

Costello, Francis J., Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S.M.E., M.S.M.E., Newark College of Engineering 
Davis, George H., Associate Professor, Psychology 

B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Yale University 
DeMichiell, Robert, Director of U.N.H. in Southeastern 

Connecticut, Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering 

Ph.D., University of Connecticut 
Desio, Peter J., Professor, Chemistry 

B.S., Boston College; Ph.D., University of New Hampshire 

DiChele, Ernest, Assistant Professor, Accounting 
B.S., University of New Haven, L.L.M., J.D., 
Boston University School 

Dinegar, Caroline A., Professor, Political Science 

B.A., Cornell University; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 

Dull, James W., Assistant Professor, Political Science 
B.A., Wilkes College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania; 
Ph.D., Columbia University 

Dworak, Robert J., Professor, Public Administration 

B.S., M.P.A., D.P.A., University of Southern California 

Eikaas, Faith H., Professor, Sociology 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Syracuse University 
Elting, Robert A., Associate Professor, Hotel Management 

B.S., M.S., Florida State University; Ph.D., New York University 

Farmer, Richard E., Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 

A.B., St. Anselm's College; M.S., University of New Haven; 
Ed.D., Boston University 

Ferringer, Natalie, Assistant Professor, Political Science 

B.S., Temple University; M.A.; Ph.D., University of Virginia 

Fitzmartin, John, Associate Professor, Management Science 

B.A., Sacred Heart University; M.S., Southern Connecticut 

State College; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 
Fox, Kenneth P., Assistant Professor, Public Administration 

B.A., Columbia College of Columbia University; Ph.D., 

University of Pennsylvania 
Frey, Roger G., Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.A., Yale College; M.S., Ph.D., Yale University 



154 



Gaensslen, Robert, Associate Professor, Criminal Justice 
B.S., University of Notre Dame; Ph.D., Cornell University 

Gangler, Joseph M., Professor, Mathematics 

B.S., University of Washington; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 

George, Edward T., Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S., M.S., Worcester Polytechnic Institute; D.Engr., Yale University 

Gere, William S., Jr., Professor, Industrial Engineering 
B.M.E., M.S. I.E., Cornell University; M.S., Ph.D., 
Carnegie-Mellon University 

Glen, Robert, Assistant Professor, History 
B.A., University of Washington at Seattle; 
M.A., Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley 

Gordon, Judith, Associate Professor, Sociology 

B.A., Brandeis University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Goulart, Elwood, Assistant Professor, Communication 

B.S., California Polytechnic State University; M.S., Humboldt 
State University; Ph.D., Indiania University 

Greet, Richard J., Professor, Mechanical Engineering 
B.E.E., Rensselear Polytechnic Institute; 
M.S., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Grodzinsky, Stephen, Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering 
S.B., S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; 
Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Gross, Franz B., Professor, Political Science 
M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Haberman, Ronald A., Assistant Professor, Industrial Engineering 
B.S.A.E., Pennsylvania State University; M.S.O.R., 
Florida Institute of Technology 

Harricharan, Wilfred R., Professor, Management Science 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Cornell University 
Hayden, George, Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.A., Curry College; M.A., Northeastern University; 

J.D., New England School of Law 

Henry, Jean, Associate Professor, Fine Arts 

B.A., Florida Atlantic University; M.A., University of Miami; 
Ph.D., Florida State University 

Hickey, Joseph E., Associate Professor, Criminal Justice 

A.B., St. John's Seminary; A.B., St. Anselm's College; 

M.S., Central Conn. State College; Ed.D., Boston University 
Hoffnung, Robert J., Associate Professor, Psychology 

A.B., Lafayette College; M.A., University of Iowa; 

Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 

Horning, Darrell W., Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering 
B.S.E.E., S.D. School of Mines; M.S.E.E., 
Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Huff, Louis, Assistant Professor of Economics 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Howard University 



155 



Hyman, Arnold, Associate Professor, Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Brooklyn College; M.S., City College of New York; 
Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 

Jensen, Gwendolyn E., Professor, History 

B.A., University of Hartford; M.A., Trinity College; 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Jette, Patricia, Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.A., Antioch College; M.S., Ph.D., Purdue University 

Jewell, Walter O., Ill, Professor, Sociology 
A.B., Ph.D., Harvard 

Kakalik, John, Associate Professor, Marketing 

B.A., Ph.D., Michigan State University 
Kalma, Dennis L., Associate Professor, Science and Biology 

B.A., Knox College; M.S., Ph.D., Yale University 
Kaloyanides, Michael C, Assistant Professor, Humanities 

B.A., Ph.D., Wesleyan University 
Kaplan, Phillip, Professor, Economics 

B.A., University of Massachusetts; M.A., Columbia; 

Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University 

Karatzas, George, Associate Professor, Economics 

B.A., Manchester University; M.A., Ph.D., New York University 

Katsaros, Thomas, Professor, History 

B.A., M.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., New York University 
Katz, Martin, Associate Professor, Management Science 

B.A., Cleveland State University; M.A., D.B.A., 

Kent State University 
Kirwin, Gerald J., Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.S., Northeastern University; M.S., Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology; Ph.D., Syracuse University 
Kleinfeld, Ira H., Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S., M.S., Eng. Sc.D., Columbia University 
Kranyik, Cynthia, Instructor, Industrial Engineering 

B.A., University of Bridgeport; M.S., University of New Haven 

Lambrakis, Konstantine C, Professor, Mechanical Engineering 
B.S.E.E., M.S.M.E., University of Bridgeport; 
Ph.D., Rensselear Polytechnic Institute 

Lee, Henry C, Professor, Criminal Justice 
B.S., John Jay College of Criminal Justice; 
M.S., Ph.D., New York University 

Listro, John, Associate Professor, Accounting 
B.S., M.S., Central Connecticut State College; 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Lucas, Richard, Assistant Professor, Marketing 
B.A., Southern Conn. State College; 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 



156 



Mann, Richard A., Professor, Civil Engineering 

B.S.M.E., University of Wisconsin; M.S.M.E., 

Northwestern University; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 
Marx, Paul, Professor, English 

B.A., University of Michigan; M.F.A., University of Iowa; 

Ph.D., New York University 

Mathieu, Bertrand M., Professor, English 

B.A., Nasson College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Arizona 
McCrohan, Kevin, Associate Professor, 

Marketing/ International Business 

B.S., New York University; M.B.A., in International Business; 

M.B.A., Baruch College; Ph.D., City University of New York 
McLaughlin, Marilou, Professor, Communication 

B.A., M.A., Villanova University; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 
Meier, Robert D., Associate Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.S., Ursinus College; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 
Mentzer, Thomas Lee, Associate Professor, Psychology 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University; M.S., Ph.D., Brown University 
Moore, John, Assistant Professor, Management Science 

B.A., Florida Atlantic University, M.A., Florida Atlantic University; 

Ph.D., Southern Illinois University 

Monahan, Lynn H., Associate Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.A., McGill University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Oregon 
Montague, Richard A., Assistant Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S.I.E., University of New Haven; M.S. I.E., Columbia University 
Morris, Michael, Assistant Professor, Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Boston College 
Morrison, Richard C, Professor, Physics 

A.B., Princeton University; M.S., Ph.D., Yale University 
Nadimfard, Abbas, Assistant Professor, Accounting 

B.A., Abadan Institute of Technology, Iran; 

M.B.A., University of California; Ph.D., Wharton School of 

Finance, University of Pennsylvania 
Nordlund, Kai K., Professor, Finance 

LL.B., University of Helsinki; M.C.L., Columbia University; 

S.J.D., New York Law School 

O'Keefe, Daniel C, Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.E.E., City College of New York; M.S.E.E., Carnegie Mellon 

University; Ph.D., Worcester Polytechnic Institute 
Paelet, David, Associate Professor, Psychology 

B.S., M.S., City College of New York; 

Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Pan, William, Associate Professor, Management Science 

B.S., National Cheng Kung University; M.B.A., Auburn University; 
Ph.D., Columbia University 

Parker, Joseph A., Professor, Economics 

B.A., Lehigh University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Oklahoma 



157 



Parker, L. Craig, Jr., Professor, Criminal Justice 

A.B., Bates College; M.Ed., Springfield College; Ph.D., State 
University of New York at Buffalo 

Plotnick, Alan, Professor, Economics 

B.A., Temple University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Poulson, Christian F., Director of New London Office; 
Assistant Professor, Management Science 
B.A., Boston University; M.A., Yale University; 
M.B.A., University of New Haven 

Qazi, Abdul H., Associate Professor, Environmental Studies 

B.Sc, M.Sc, University of Peshawar, Pakistan; M.S., University 
of the Pacific; Ph.D., University of Oklahoma 

Rainish, Robert, Assistant Professor, Finance 

B.S., City College of New York; M.B.A., Baruch College, 
City University of New York 

Raucher, Steven A., Assistant Professor, Communication 
B.A., Queens College; M.S., Brooklyn College; 
Ph.D., Wayne State University 

Reams, Dinwiddle C, Jr., Professor, Science and Biology 

B.Ch.E., University of Virginia; M.Eng., D.Eng., Yale University 

Reimer, Richard, Associate Professor, Accounting 

B.B.A., University of Commerce, Vienna; M.S., Columbia University 

Rich, Anne, Associate Professor, Accounting 

B.A., Queens College; M.B.A., University of Bridgeport; 
Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 

Robillard, Douglas, Professor, English 

B.S., M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Wayne State University 

Robin, Gerald D., Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.A., Temple University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Rodrigues, Arvin, Assistant Professor, Marketing 
B.Tech., Indian Institute of Tech., India; 
M.S., Stanford University; Ph.D., Columbia University 

Ross, Bertram, Professor, Mathematics 

M.S., Wilkes College; M.S., Ph.D., Courant Institute 

(New York University) 
Ross, Stephen M., Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.E., New York University; Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University 
Rosenthal, Erik J., Assistant Professor, Mathematics 

B.A., Queens College, SUNY, M.A., Ph.D., University of 

California at Berkeley 
Sachdeva, Baldev K., Assistant Professor, Mathematics 

B.S., M.A., Delhi University, India; Ph.D., Pennsylvania 

State University 
Sack, Allen, Associate Professor, Sociology 

B.A., University of Notre Dame; M.A., Ph.D., Pennsylvania 

State University 



158 



Saleeby, B. Badri, Professor, Mechanical Engineering- 

B.S.M.E., Cooper Union; M.S.M.E., Ph.D., Northwestern University 

Saliby, Michael, Assistant Professor, Chemistry 
B.S., Union College, Ph.D., SUNY-Binghamton 

Sarris, John, Associate professor. Mechanical Engineering 
B.A., Hamilton College; M.S., Ph.D., Tufts University 

Sawhney, Shiv. L., Professor, Management Science 

B.A., LL.B., Delhi University; M.B.A., Ph.D., New York University 

Sherwood, Franklin B., Professor, Economics 

B.A., M.A., University of Connecticut; Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Sloane, David E.E., Associate Professor, English 

B.A., Wesleyan University; M.A., Ph.D., Duke University 

Smith, Warren J., Associate Professor, Business Administration 
B.S., University of Connecticut; M.B.A., Northeastern University 

Sommers, Alexis N., Professor, Industrial Engineering 
B.M.E., Cornell University; M.S., Rutgers University; 
Ph.D., Purdue University 

Stanley, Richard M., Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering 
B.E.S., The Johns Hopkins University; M.S., M.Phil., 
Ph.D., Yale University 

Staugaard, Burton C, Professor, Science and Biology 

A.B., Brown University; M.S., University of Rhode Island; 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Stimson, Richard A., Associate Professor, Management Science 
B.A., Yale University; M.S., International University 

Surti, Kantilal K., Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.E., University of Gujarat, India; M.E.E., University of Delaware; 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Taylor, Barbara, Assistant Professor, Management Science 

B.S., B.A., University of Vermont; M.S., University of Massachusetts 

Teluk, John J., Professor, Economics 

B.A., Graduate School of Economics, Munich; B.S., University of 
New Haven; M.A., Free University, Munich 

Theilman, Ward, Associate Professor, Economics 
B.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Tyndall, Bruce, Professor, Mathematics 
B.A., M.S., University of Iowa 

Uebelacker, James W., Associate Professor, Mathematics 
B.A., LeMoyne College, M.A., Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Usiewicz, Ronald A., Associate Professor, Hotel Management 
B.S., Penn State University; M.S., University of 
Wisconsin-Stout; Ph.D., Kent State University 

Vasileff, Henry D., Associate Professor, Finance 

B.A., M.A., University of Toronto; M.B.A., University of 
Connecticut; Ph.D., University of Toronto 



159 



Vigue, Charles L., Assistant Professor, Science and Biology 
B.A., M.S., University of Maine; Ph.D., North Carolina 
State University 

Voegeli, Henry E., Associate Professor, Science and Biology 

B.A., University of Connecticut; Ph.D., University of Rhode Island 

Wakin, Shirley, Assistant Professor, Mathematics 
B.A., University of Bridgeport; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Massachusetts 

Warner, Thomas C, Jr., Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.E., Yale University; M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Wentworth, Ronald N., Assistant Professor, Management Science 
B.S.M.E., Northeastern University; M.S. I.E., 
University of Massachusetts; Ph.D., Purdue University 

Werblow, Jack, Associate Professor, Public Administration 

B.A., Cornell University; M.B.A., Wharton School of Finance; 
Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 

Weybrew, Benjamin B., Assistant Professor, Psychology 
B.A., University of Kansas; M.A., University of California, 
Los Angeles; Ph.D., University of Colorado 

Wheeler, George L., Assistant Professor, Chemistry 

B.A., Catholic University of America; Ph.D., University of Maryland 

Whiteman, Gilbert L., Associate Professor, Communication 
B.Ed., University of Nebraska; M.A., University of Oklahoma; 
Ph.D., Michigan State University 

Whitley, W. Thurmon, Associate Professor, Mathematics 

B.S., Stetson University; M.A., University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University 

Wiggins, Catherine, Assistant Professor, Public Administration 
B.S., Hampton Institute; M.S.W., University of Pennsylvania; 
Ph.D., New York University 

Williams, Jeffery L., Associate Professor, Accounting 

B.S., University of New Haven; M.B.A., University of Bridgeport 

Wnek, Robert, Assistant Professor, Accounting 

B.S., Villanova University; J.D., Delaware Law School of 
Widener College 

Wright, H. Fessenden, Professor, Science and Biology 

A.B., Oberlin College; M.S., Ph.D., Cornell University; F.A.I.C. 

York, Michael W., Associate Professor, Psychology 
B.A., M.A., Southern Methodist University; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland 

Zern, Martin M., Associate Professor, Accounting 

B.S., New York University; J.D., Brooklyn Law School; 
LL.M., New York University 



160 



Faculty Professional Licensure and Accreditation 

Bechir, M. Hamdy, Professional Engineer, Connecticut, Massachusetts, 

New Hampshire, Vermont, Oklahoma 
Brown, David, Consulting Psychologist, Connecticut 
Carson, George R., Professional Engineer, Connecticut, Massachusetts, 

New York, New Jersey; Landscape Architect, Connecticut; 

Land Surveyor, Connecticut, Massachusetts; 

Professional Planner, New Jersey 
Davis, George H., Clinical Psychologist, Connecticut 
Elting, Robert A., Registered Dietitian 
Everhart, Deborah, Clinical Psychologist, Connecticut 

Hayden, George A., Attorney at Law, Massachusetts, Connecticut; 

U.S. District Court, Supreme Court of U.S. 
Hyman, Arnold, Consulting Psychologist, Connecticut 
Mann, Richard A., Professional Engineer, Wisconsin 

Martin, John C, Professional Engineer, Connecticut, New York, 

Colorado, Pennsylvania, Vermont 
Meier, Robert D., Consulting Psychologist, Connecticut 
Monahan, Lynn Hunt, Clinical Psychologist, Connecticut 
Parker, Joseph A., Accredited Personnel Specialist 

Parker, L. Craig, Consulting Psychologist, Wisconsin; 
Certified Psychologist, Province of Alberta, Canada 
Reimer, Richard, Certified Public Accountant, Connecticut 

Rich, Anne, Certified Public Accountant, Conn.; Holder of 

Certificate in Management Accounting 
Ross, Bertram, Professional Engineer, New York, Ohio 
Surti, Kantilal K., Chartered Engineer, U.K. 
Warner, Thomas C, Jr., Professional Engineer, Connecticut 
Williams, Jeffery L., Certified Public Accountant, Connecticut 

Wnek, Robert, Certified Public Accountant, Connecticut; 
Member of Bar, Connecticut; Member of Bar, Pennsylvania 

Wright, H. Fessenden, Registered Chemical Consultant 

York, Michael, Clinical Psychologist, Connecticut 

Zem, Martin M., Certified Public Accountant, New York; 
Attorney at Law, New York 



Special Lecturers 

Abbagnaro, Peter, Lecturer, Taxation 
B.S., Quinnipiac College 
Manager U.S. Internal Revenue Service 



161 



Aparo, Joyce E., Lecturer, Public Administration 
M.S.W., University of Connecticut 
Director of Planning & Research, 
State Department of Human Resources 

Beck, Irving H., Lecturer, Public Administration 
M.S., University of Denver 
Finance Director Town of East Haven 

Bennett, Joseph L., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 
M.S., University of New Haven 
Senior Programmer Analyst - ECLECTECH, Associates 

Berecz, Victor G., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 
M.S., Yale University 
Norden Division of United Technologies Corp. 

Bertone, Carmen M., Lecturer, Psychology 
Ph.D., Los Angeles University 
Chief, Human Factors Engineering, Sikorsky Aircraft Corp. 

Betz, J. Michael, Lecturer, Public Administration 
M.P.A., University of New Haven 
Department Manager, Municipal Finance, Union Trust Co. 

Bobko, John R., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 
M.S., R.P.I. , Hartford Graduate Center 

Borden, Richard, Lecturer, Public Administration 

M.B.A., University of Hartford; M.P.A., University of New Haven 

Town Manager, Town of Glastonbury 
Brignola, Joseph M., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

M.S., University of New Haven 

Systems and Programming Manager, Producto Machine Corp. 

Burt, Harold V. Jr., Lecturer, Management Science 

M.S., Polytechnic Institute of New York 

Manager, Operations Research Department, 

United Bank & Trust Company 
Butterworth, William J., Lecturer, Accounting 

M.B.A., Seton Hall University; C.P.A. 

Canas, Jose, Lecturer, Accounting 

M.B.A., University of Connecticut; C.P.A. 

Cascini, Karen T., Lecturer, Accounting & Finance 
M.B.A., University of New Haven 

Chasan, Joshua, Lecturer, Sociology 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 
Director, Sage-Advocate 

Ciarlone, Richard A., Lecturer, Management Science 
M.B.A., University of Maryland 
Senior Operations Research Associate, Uniroyal Chemical 

Connolly, John T., Lecturer, Criminal Justice 

Ph.B., Holy Cross College; M.A., Fordham University 
Retired Chief U.S. Probation Officer, Federal Court, N.Y.C. 

Culhane, Michael C, Lecturer, Economics 
M.A., Fairfield University 



162 



Curtis, Carey, Lecturer, Accounting 
M.B.A., University of Hartford; C.P.A. 

Dallob, David, Lecturer, Management Science 
M.B.A., Hofstra University 
Plant Manager, Wheeler Electronics, Division of Sperry-Rand 

D'Amore, Robert, Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 
B.A., Quinnipiac College 
Cost Accounting Manager, Emhart Inc. 

DeMayo, William, Lecturer, Taxation 

M.B.A., New York University, C.P.A. 

Partner, Ernst & Whinney, Certified Public Accountants 
DeSanto, Robert S., Lecturer, Environmental Sciences 

Ph.D., Columbia University 

Chief Ecologist DeLeuw, Cather Co. 

Devaney, Earl J., Lecturer, Marketing 
M.B.A., University of Massachusetts 
Gerald Rosen Company 

DiNapoli, Alfred F., Lecturer, Accounting 
M.B.A., University of New Haven 
Sr. Cost Accountant, Eyelet Specialty Co. 

Driscoll, Vincent, Lecturer, Economics 
Ph.D., New School for Social Research 

Erickson, David L., Lecturer, Accounting 
M.B., University of Cincinnati; C.P.A. 

Evans, Richard L., Lecturer, Accounting 
M.B.A., University of Connecticut 

Feldman, Gerald, Lecturer, Accounting 
M.B.A., University of New Haven 

Fisher, Henry, Lecturer, Public Administration 
L.L.B., Columbia University 
Partner Law Firm Ritter, Silverstone & Fisher 

Forbes, Raymond, Lecturer, Psychology 
Ph.D., U.S. International University 
Corporate Manager of Human Resource Development, 
Raybestos Company 

Fox, Diana B., Lecturer, Public Administration 
M.S.W., Columbia University 
Program Supervisor, Fairfield Hills State Hospital 

Frascatore, Joseph C. Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 
M.S., University of New Haven 
Vice President of Operations, Northeast DataCom 

Ghattas, Reda, Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 
M.S. I.E., Rutgers University 
Manager, Industrial Engineering Department, 
Pratt-Whitney Aircraft 



163 



Greenberg, Richard, Lecturer, Accounting 
J.D., L.L.M., Boston University 
Assistant Attorney General, State of Connecticut 
Banking Department 

Grodzinsky, Frances S., Lecturer, English 
Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Grozalsky, Samuel, Lecturer, Accounting 
M.B.A., Babson College 

Helie, Raymond, Lecturer, Accounting 
M.B.A., University of Hartford 
Cost Accounting Manager, Interroyal Corporation 

Hertel, Eugene S., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 
M.S., North Carolina State University 
Sr. Chemical Engineer, Uniroyal Chemical Company 

James, William H., Lecturer, Economics 
Ph.D., Yale University 

Klarberg, David P., Biology & Science 
Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 

Klein, James P., Lecturer, Taxation 

J.D., Columbia University; L.L.M., in Taxation, N.Y. University 

Kraus, John J., Lecturer, Management Science 
M.B.A., University of Pennsylvania 

Kubic, Thomas A., Lecturer, Forensic Science 
J.D., St. John's University; M.S., C.W. Post 
Detective/Criminalist, Nassau County Police Department 

Kuchar, Charles, Lecturer, Finance 
M.B.A., University of New Haven 

Kuchta, William, Lecturer, Management Science 

M.S., SUNY at Albany; M.L.I.R., Michigan State University 
Plant Personnel Manager, Boehringer Ingelheim, Ltd. 

Lamberti, James T., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 
M.S., Rutgers University 
Supervisor, Pratt & Whitney Aircraft 

Landry, Roger, Lecturer, Management Science 
M.B.A., University of Connecticut 
Director of Systems Development, St. Mary's Hospital 

Lanza, Gerald J., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 
M.S., University of New Haven 

Lavarini, Charles F., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 
M.S., University of Arizona 

Levitin, Moshe, Lecturer, Accounting 
M.B.A., Baruch College, C.P.A. 

Loughlin, James C, Lecturer, Economics 
Ph.D., Clark University 



164 



Manson, John R., Lecturer, Criminal Justice 
M.S., University of Bridgeport 
Commissioner, Connecticut Department of Correction 

Marchese, Michael J., Lecturer, International Business 

Master of International Management, American Graduate School 

of International Management 

Vice President, International Management, Union Trust Company 

Markle, Arnold, Lecturer, Criminal Justice 
L.L.B., Boston University 
State's Attorney for New Haven County 

Mathew, Philip I., Lecturer, Economics 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Maurice, Barbara, Lecturer, Management Science 
M.S., University of Connecticut 

McGuigan, Austin, Lecturer, Economics 
J.D., Boston University School of Law 
Chief State's Attorney State of Connecticut 

McPherson, Stephen B., Lecturer, Public Administration 
M.B.A., University of New Haven 
Controller, Hospital of Saint Raphael 

Mirakian, Robert A., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 
B.A., Southern Connecticut State College 
Senior Analyst, Armstrong Rubber Company 

Myers, Austin, Lecturer, Management Science 
M.B.A., Yale University 

Nann, Dorothy, Lecturer, Management Science 
M.S., University of Connecticut 
Research Analyst, Southern New England Telephone Company 

Oaks, Jose, Lecturer, Accounting & Finance 
M.B.A., New York University; C.P.A. 

O'Connor, Frank, Lecturer, Sociology 
M.S.W., University of Connecticut 

Ostroske, Kenneth, Lecturer, Accounting 
J.D., University of Connecticut; C.P.A. 
Tax Manager, Arthur Young & Company 

O'Mahony, Michael, Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 
M.S., Fordham University; M.A., Alabama University 
Project Manager, General Electric 

Pabilonia, James, Lecturer, Accounting 
M.S., University of Connecticut 
Account Executive, Merrill Lynch 

Pae, Ki-Tai, Lecturer, Economics & Management Science 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Pagliaro, Frank C, Lecturer, Public Administration 
A.S., University of New Haven 
Director Fiscal Services, Griffin Hospital Inc. 



165 



Perlini, Robert A., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 
M.B.A., University of Hartford 

Pinto, John D. Jr., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 
M.A.S., Boston University 
Systems Analyst, I.O.C.S. (Input-Output Computer Systems) 

Pratesi, Edward E., Lecturer, Finance 

M.B.A., University of New Haven; C.P.A. 

Puleo, Joseph A., Lecturer, Accounting 

M.B.A., City University of New York; C.P.A. 

Reffner, John A., Lecturer, Criminal Justice 

Ph.D., University of Connecticut 
Reid, Thomas A., Lecturer, Psychology 

Psy.D., University of Illinois 

Director, Hamden Mental Health Service 

Rosen, Stephen S., Lecturer, Civil and Environmental Engineering 
Ph.D., Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn 
Chief Environmental Engineer, Parsons, Brinkerhoff 

Rubin, David, Lecturer, Accounting 

M.B.A., University of Cincinnatti; C.P.A. 
Ryack, Bernard L., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 

Assistant Director, Human Factors Department, Naval Submarine 

Medical Research Laboratory 

Ryba, Walter G. Jr., Lecturer, Economics 

Ph.D., Fordham University; J.D., University of Connecticut 

Salwan, Vern C, Lecturer, Finance 
M.B.A., University of New Haven 

Sandel, Susan, Lecturer, Sociology 

Ph.D., Union Graduate School 
Santello, Dolph, Lecturer, Public Administration 

M.P.A., University of New Haven 

Scalia, Frank A., Lecturer, Psychology 
Ph.D., Carnegie-Mellon University 

Assistant Vice President, Human Resources Development, 
Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Company 

Schwartz, Robert, Lecturer, Political Science 
J.D., Rutgers Law School 

Special Assistant to Senate Majority Leader, Connecticut 
Legislation and Staff Director of Democratic Caucus 

Shapazian, Kenneth C, Lecturer, Finance 
M.B.A., University of Connecticut 

Silbert, Jonathan E., Lecturer, Criminal Justice 
J.D., Harvard Law School 
Partner, Garrison, Kahn, Crane & Silbert, Attorneys at Law 

Smith, W. Reed, Lecturer, Management Science 
B.S., Marietta College 
Manager Operations Research, Uniroyal Chemical 



166 



Sobolewski, Rosemary, Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 
M.S., University of New Haven 

Director and Coordinator of the Computer Programming 
Training Easter Seal Rehabilitation Center 

Sotir, Thomas, Lecturer, Management Science 
M.B.A., Xavier University 
Director of Industrial Relations, Electric Boat 

Stein, Richard, Lecturer, Accounting 

L.L.M. (Taxation), University of Cincinnati; 
J.D., University of Cincinnati 

Steinberg, Marvin A., Lecturer, Psychology 
Ph.D., University of Texas 
Assistant Director, Hamden VIental Health Service 

Sylvia, Edwin A., Lecturer, Psychology 
M.A., University of Southern Mississippi 

Chief Management Development /Training, Electric Boat Division, 
General Dynamics Corporation 

Taranto, Armand C, Lecturer, Management Science 
M.B.A., University of Hartford 

Terrance, Dwight, Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 
B.S., SUNY at Buffalo 

Tobin, Joseph M., Lecturer, Business Law 
J.D., Fordham University 
Tobin & Levine, Attorneys at Law 

Todt, Malcolm S., Lecturer, Accounting 
M.B.A., Babson College 
Assistant Treasurer, Insilco Corporation 

Tolonen, Karl, Lecturer, Environmental Sciences 
Ph.D., Yale University 
Ecological Consultant to the New Haven Water Company 

Tomascik, Robert, Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 
B.A., University of Connecticut 

Tritton, Louise, Lecturer, Biology and Science 
Ph.D., Yale University 

Tylaska, Theodore T., Lecturer, Electrical Engineering 
Ph.D., University of Houston 
Head, Computer Technology Branch, 
Naval Underwater Systems Center 

Usher, Theron, Lecturer, Electrical Engineering 
D.Eng., Yale University 

Washburn, Robert, Lecturer, Management Science 
Ph.D., Cornell University 

Weber, David, Lecturer, Economics 
Ph.D., Brown University 

Wilson, Glenn T., Lecturer, Finance 
M.B.A., Columbia University 



167 



Welsh, Walter, Lecturer, Accounting 

L.L.M. (in Taxation), New York University School of Law; 
J.D., University of Connecticut Law School 

Zietlow, David, Lecturer, Management Science 
M.L.I.R., Michigan State University 
Senior Personnel Administrator, Sikorsky Aircraft 

Zottola, Armand, Lecturer, Economics 
Ph.D., Catholic University of America 



168 



A 

A course prefixes 92 

Academic calendar v 

Academic counseling 6 

Academic piolicies 6 

Academic programs 25 

Academic standards 8 

Accounting 

Concentration in the M.B.A. Program .... 30 

Course descriptions (A) 92 

M.S. degree program 25 

Accounting and taxation senior professional 

Certificate 80 

Accreditation of the university 1 

Administration 152 

Admission 

General requirements 2 

Categories 2 

International students 4 

Procedure 2 

Affirmative action ii 

Alumni association 19 

Appeals of probation 8 

Athletics 19 

Auditors 3 

Awarding of degrees 7 



B 

Biology, environmental studies 

and general science course 

descriptions (SO 144 

Board of Governors 151 

Bookstore 19 

Business administration / industrial 

engineering dual degree program 36 

Business administration, 

master's degree program 27 

Business law course descriptions (LA) 122 



c 

Calendar, academic v 

Career development 20 

CE course prefixes 95 

CH course prefixes 97 

Chemistry course descriptions (CH) 97 

Civil and environmental engineering 

course descriptions (CE) 95 

C] course prefixes 98 

CO course prefixes 102 

Communication course descriptions (CO) . . 102 



Community psychology, 
M. A. degree program 38 

Completion of degree requirements, 

time limit 11 

Computer and information science 

Concentration in the M.B.A. program .... 30 
M.S. degree program 41 

Computer applications and information 

systems senior professional certificate 82 

Computer facilities 20 

Counseling 

Academic 6 

Personal 20 

Course descriptions 

Accounting (A) 92 

Biology, environmental studies 

and general science (SC) 144 

Business law (LA) 122 

Chemistry (CH) 97 

Civil and environmental 

engineering (CE) 95 

Communication (CO) 102 

Criminal justice (CJ) 98 

Economics (£0 104 

English (E) 104 

Electrical engineering (EE) 107 

Environmental engineering (CE) 95 

Environmental science (SC) 144 

Executive M.B.A. (EXID) 109 

Finance (FI) Ill 

General science (SC) 144 

Hospitality administration (HM) 113 

Humanities (HU) 114 

International business (IB) 116 

Industrial engineering (IE) 117 

Law (LA) 122 

Logistics management (LCT) 123 

Mathematics (M) 124 

Mechanical engineering (ME) 125 

Management science (MG) 127 

Marketing (MK) 131 

Occupational safety and 

health management (SH) 69 

Philosophy (PL) 141 

Physics (PH) 141 

Political science (PS) 141 

Psychology (P) 132 

Public Administration (PA) 137 

Quantitative Analysis (QA) 143 

Science (SC) 144 

Sociology (SO) 146 

Social Welfare (SW) 149 

Criminal justice 

Concentration in correctional 

counseling 46 

Concentration in criminal 

justice management 45 

Course descriptions (C]) 98 

M.S. degree program 43 



169 



Degree programs, see 
Programs of study 

Dormitory, see 
Housing 

Dual degree program . 



.36 



E 

E course prefixes 104 

EC course prefixes 104 

Economic forecasting 

Concentration in the M.B.A. Program .... 30 

Senior professional certificate 82 

Economics course descriptions (EC) 104 

££ course prefixes 107 

Electrical engineering 

Course descriptions (EE) 107 

M.S. degree program 47 

Eligibility for financial aid 15 

Employment placement 20 

English course descriptions (E) 104 

Environmental engineering, 

Course descriptions (CE) 95 

M.S. degree program 49 

Environmental sciences. 

Course descriptions (SO 144 

M.S. degree program 51 

Environmental studies course 

descriptions (SO 144 

Ethics 11 

Executive Master of Business Administration 

Course descriptions (EXID) 109 

Degree program 52 

EXID course prefixes 109 



F 

Faculty 153 

Fees 12 

Fl Course prefixes Ill 

Finance 

Concentration in the M.B.A. program ... 31 
Financial accounting option, 

accounting and taxation senior 

professional certificate 80 

Financial support for graduate study 15 

Foreign Students, see International students 
Forensic science, 

M.S. degree program 54 

Fully matriculated student 3 



G 

General information. Graduate School 1 

General management senior 

professional certificate 83 

General science course 

descriptions (SO 144 

Gerontology, M. A. degree program 57 

Grade reports 8 

Grading system 7 

Graduate School ethics 11 

Graduate Student Council 20 



H 

Handicapped services 21 

Health care management concentration 

In the M.B.A. program 31 

In the M.P.A. program 78 

HM Course prefixes 113 

Hospitality administration 

Concentration in the M.B.A. program .32 

Course descriptions (HM) 113 

Option in the M.B.A. program 32 

Housing 21 

HU Course Prefixes 114 

Human resources management 

Concentration in the M.B.A. program 32 

Senior professional certificate 83 

Humanities 

Course descriptions (HU) 114 

M.A. degree program 59 

I 

IB course prefixes 116 

IE course prefixes 117 

In-process registration 5 

Independent study 10 

Industrial Engineering 

Course descriptions (IE) 117 

M.S. degree program 60 

Industrial relations, M.S. degree program 62 
International Business 

Concentration in the M.B.A. program .33 

Course descriptions (IB) 116 

Senior professional certificate 84 

International students 

Admission 4 

Office of 21 



Job placement of students 20 



170 



L 

LA course prefixes 122 

Law course descriptions (LA) 122 

Legal studies, M.A. 

degree program 64 

Library 21 

Living costs 14 

Logistics 

Concentration in business logistics 67 

Concentration in logistics engineering 67 

Concentration in logistics management ... 67 
M.S. degree program 65 



M 

M course prefixes 124 

M.A. degree programs, see 

Master of Arts degree programs 

Management and organization 

concentration in the M.B.A. program 33 

Management Science 

Concentration in the M.B.A. program .... 33 
Course descriptions (^AG) 127 

Managerial accounting option, accounting 
and taxation senior professional 
certificate 80 

Marketing 

Concentration in the M.B.A. program .33 

Course descriptions (MK) 131 

Senior professional certificate 84 

Master of Arts degree programs 

Community psychology 38 

Gerontology 57 

Humanities 59 

Legal studies 64 

Organizational /industrial psychology .... 73 

Master of Business Administration 27 

Master of Business Administration 

for Executives degree program 52 

Master of Business Administration /Master 
of Science in Industrial Engineering 
dual degree 36 

Master of Public Administration 

degree program 77 

Master of Science Degree Programs 

Accounting 25 

Computer and information science 41 

Criminal justice 43 

Electrical engineering 47 

Environmental engineering 49 

Environmental sciences 51 

Forensic science 54 

Industrial engineering 60 

Industrial relations 62 

Logistics 65 



Mechanical engineering 67 

Occupational safety and 

health management 69 

Operations research 71 

Taxation 86 

Mathematics course descriptions (Mj 124 

M.B.A 27 

ME course prefixes 125 

Mechanical engineering 

Course descriptions (ME) 125 

M.S. degree program 67 

Media in business concentration in the M.B.A. 

program 34 

MG course prefixes 127 

Minority student affairs 22 

MK course prefixes 131 

M.P. A. degree program 77 

M.S. degree programs, see 

Master of Science degree programs 



o 

Occupational safety and 

health management 69 

Operations Research 

Concentration in the M.B.A. program ... 34 

M.S. Degree Program 71 

Organizational /industrial psychology, 

M.S. degree program 73 



P 

P course prefixes 132 

PA course prefixes 137 

Payment of tuition and fees 13 

Personal counseling 20 

PH course prefixes 141 

Physically handicapped students 21 

Physics course descriptions (PH) 141 

Placement of graduates 20 

Political science course 

descriptions (PS) 141 

Probation and appeals 8 

Programs of study 

Accounting 25 

Business administration 27 

Business administration / Industrial 

engineering dual degree 36 

Community psychology 38 

Computer and information science 41 

Criminal justice 43 

Electrical engineering 47 

Environmental engineering 49 

Environmental sciences 51 



171 



Executive master of business 

administration 52 

Forensic science 54 

Gerontology 57 

Humanities 59 

Industrial engineering 60 

Industrial relations 62 

Legal studies 64 

Logistics 65 

Mechanical engineering 67 

Occupational safety and 

health management 69 

Operations research 69 

Organizational /industrial psychology ... 73 

Public administration 11 

Senior professional certificates 79 

Taxation 86 

Provisional student 3 

PS course prefixes 141 

Psycho-social relations concentration 

in the gerontology program 58 

Psychology course descriptions (P) 132 

Public administration 

Course descriptions {PA) 137 

Master's degree program 11 

Public management senior 

professional certificate 85 

Public personnel management option, 
public management senior professional 
certificate 85 

Publications 22 



Q 

Q/4 course prefixes 143 

Quantitative analysis 

Course descriptions (Q,A) 143 

Senior professional certificate 86 

Quantitative techniques in 

marketing option, marketing 

senior professional certificate 84 



s 

SC course prefixes 144 

SH course prefixes 146 

Science course descriptions {SO 144 

Seminar projects 10 

Senior professional certificates 79 

Accounting and taxation 80 

Accounting information systems 80 

Financial accounting option 80 

Managerial accounting option 80 

Taxation of corporations 81 

Taxation of individuals 81 

Applications of psychology 81 

Computer applications and 

information systems 82 

Economic forecasting 82 

Finance 82 

General management 83 

International business 84 

Human resources management 83 

Marketing 84 

Marketing option 84 

Quantitative techniques in 

marketing option 84 

Media for business 83 

Public management 

Survey of the field option 85 

Urban and regional planning 

and management option 85 

Public personnel management option 85 

Quantitative analysis 86 

Services for students 19 

SO course prefixes 146 

Social welfare course descriptions {S\N) ... 149 

Sociology course descriptions {SO) 146 

Special student 3 

Student services 19 

Survey of the field option, 
public management senior 

professional certificate 85 

StV course prefixes 149 



R 

Radio station WNHU 22 

Refunds 13 

Registration procedures 5 

Repetition of work 8 

Requirements for admission 2 

Research projects, seminar projects 

and independent study 10 

Residency requirements 11 



T 

Taxation 

M.S. degree program 86 

Option, accounting and taxation senior 

professional certificate 80 

Testing 20 

Thesis requirements 9 

Time limit for completion of 

degree requirements 11 

Title IX '1 

Title XX funds 16 

Transfer credit 9 

Tuition and Fees 12 



172 



u 



Urban and regional planning and 

management option, public management 
senior professional certificate 85 



Veterans affairs 22 



w 



Waiver of courses 9 

Withdrawal from tfie university 13 

WNHU radio 22 



173 




174 



NOTES 



NOTES 



NOTES 



NOTES 



NOTES 



NOTES 



NOTES 



NOTES 



NOTES 



NOTES 



NOTES 



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